Finasteride (brand name Propecia) is the closest to a hair loss cure pill that scientists have discovered to date. This is a DHT hair loss cure. DHT is made when 5 alpha reductase converts testosterone, and Propecia has been found to be an effective inhibitor of DHT by preventing this process from happening. It works internally, at the root of the cause. Therefore, DHT sensitive hair follicles in the front and top of the scalp don’t have to fight off nearly as much DHT.
Certainly a company with a unique background and game plan, HairClone has received some recent media attention. The UK biotech startup was featured in this month’s publication of “Consulting Room” online magazine. In the article both Dr. Bessam Farjo and Paul Kemp of HairClone provided insight as to the company’s current progress and plans for the future. Things seem to be coming along well for HairClone and we should expect to hear from them again within the next several weeks. Full story is on Articles main page.
A popular skin care drug—which is intended to target eczema—was just found to have an unusual side effect: hair growth. According to an article on Newsweek, the FDA-approved drug dupilumab was given to a 13-year-old alopecia sufferer to treat her eczema. The patient, who hadn’t grown hair on her scalp since she was two, suddenly grew a significant amount of hair on her head after continual use of the drug, a study in the journal JAMA Dermatology reports.
Rogaine’s foam squirts out just like hair mousse and is applied with “cool, dry hands.” Applying means working the foam down to the scalp where you want to see thicker growth — for it to work, “it has to get into your scalp,” Dr. Wolfeld explains. “If it sits on your hair, it’s not really as effective.” Once massaged, it dissolves into a watery liquid that leaves a tingly sensation, “but no burning!” one of our balding testers was happy to discover.
In Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury,” Kuntzman’s theory is bolstered. Wolff writes that Ivanka Trump “often described the mechanics behind it to friends: an absolutely clean pate—a contained island after scalp-reduction ­surgery—surrounded by a furry circle of hair around the sides and front, from which all ends are drawn up to meet in the center and then swept back and secured by a stiffening spray.”
Telogen effluvium is a nonscarring, noninflammatory alopecia of relatively sudden onset, with similar incidences between sexes and age groups. It occurs when large numbers of hairs enter the telogen phase and fall out three to five months after a physiologic or emotional stressor. The list of inciting factors is extensive and includes severe chronic illnesses, pregnancy, surgery, high fever, malnutrition, severe infections, and endocrine disorders. Causative medications include retinoids, anticoagulants, anticonvulsants, beta blockers, and antithyroid medications; discontinuation of oral contraceptive agents is another possible cause.17

Kuntzman described the “snake oil” era of hair restoration, in the early twentieth century, when salesmen offered nonsense treatments, often with horrific results. One involved “cylinders of skin taken from the abdomen and sewn into your scalp to function as a sort of belt loop” for new hairs, Kuntzman said; another used paraffin injections that left some customers with lifelong horn-like head bumps. Most of the really ugly stuff ended in 1938, when the Food and Drug Administration began regulating the industry.
MAX BioPharma, a company working with Hedgehog pathway therapeutics, wants to test its lead compound for hair growth in  mouse model. If data from this experiment turns out to be positive the company says it will reach out to cosmetic or larger pharma partners to commercialize the product. While we currently don’t know how this therapy will fare for hair growth, in the past we have seen impressive potential from stimulators of the Hedgehog pathway.
Yet another company has made news this week for phase 2 trial progress. Concert Pharmaceuticals announced today that they have completed enrollment for their phase 2a trial using CTP-543 in alopecia areata. CTP-543 is an oral JAK inhibitor which acts on JAK 1 and 2, it’s also known as ruxolitinib. Concert’s version of ruxolitinib has been modified by the company’s proprietary deuterium chemistry technology which the company hopes will improve its effects on AA.
One hard truth: Hair loss is mostly out of your control. “Baldness comes down to your genes,” says Frederick Joyce, M.D., founder of Rejuvenate! Med Spa and a member of the International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery. “If you have the baldness gene, there are some natural remedies that may make your hair stronger and healthier to slow your hair loss slightly—but they won’t prevent you from going bald. Still, maintaining hair health by eating well and using the right products—combined with medical-grade treatments—can really work all together to help you have a fuller, thicker head of hair.”
Dr. Carlos Wesley, a hair restoration surgeon in Manhattan, said that women in his practice respond better to P.R.P. than men do, which may have something to do with the fact that women with genetic hair loss tend to have more inflammatory cells around the follicles. From 2013 to 2014, he said, he had an 83 percent increase in female patients, in part because of P.R.P.
P.R.P., considered a nonsurgical treatment, is not covered by insurance, and clinical studies about its effectiveness (and longevity of results) are not conclusive because different doctors use different mixes. But P.R.P. has a long (though also inconclusive) history of use elsewhere in the body. Athletes like Kobe Bryant have received the treatment in an attempt to heal injuries.
During a hair transplant procedure, a dermatologist or cosmetic surgeon removes tiny patches of skin, each containing one to several hairs, from the back or side of your scalp. Sometimes a larger strip of skin containing multiple hair groupings is taken. He or she then implants the hair follicle by follicle into the bald sections. Some doctors recommend using minoxidil after the transplant, to help minimize hair loss. And you may need more than one surgery to get the effect you want. Hereditary hair loss will eventually progress despite surgery.
Important clues to the etiology of different patterns and types of hair loss are listed in Table 1 and Table 2. Hair that comes out in clumps suggests telogen effluvium. Systemic symptoms such as fatigue and weight gain suggest hypothyroidism, whereas a febrile illness, stressful event, or recent pregnancy may account for the diffuse hair loss of telogen effluvium. The use of hair products such as straightening agents or certain shampoos suggests a diagnosis of trichorrhexis nodosa. A family history of hypothyroidism may warrant laboratory testing for this condition, whereas a family history of hair loss supports the diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia.
NFL Hall of Fame player Deion Sanders has recently undergone a hair transplant. He has not been shy about discussing it publicly and over the last several weeks has actually continued to put out a slew of hilarious and outrageous posts pertaining to his renewed follicles. For his first announcement to social media, he posted this jubilant and priceless video to his Instagram:
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.

Yet another company has made news this week for phase 2 trial progress. Concert Pharmaceuticals announced today that they have completed enrollment for their phase 2a trial using CTP-543 in alopecia areata. CTP-543 is an oral JAK inhibitor which acts on JAK 1 and 2, it’s also known as ruxolitinib. Concert’s version of ruxolitinib has been modified by the company’s proprietary deuterium chemistry technology which the company hopes will improve its effects on AA. 

Dr. Carlos Wesley, a hair restoration surgeon in Manhattan, said that women in his practice respond better to P.R.P. than men do, which may have something to do with the fact that women with genetic hair loss tend to have more inflammatory cells around the follicles. From 2013 to 2014, he said, he had an 83 percent increase in female patients, in part because of P.R.P.
Baldness is not caused by excess testosterone as is commonly thought; nor is it inherited from your maternal grandfather. It’s caused by sensitivity to testosterone: an enzyme converts testosterone into a substance called dihydrotestosterone – which then causes the follicle to shrink and fall out. Male pattern baldness is inherited, but from both or either side of your genetic line. Why men go bald, we’re not sure – though there is a hypothesis that baldness was once a genetic advantage. People tend to associate baldness with virility and wisdom. The bald hunter-gatherer would have been a natural choice for a chieftain back when life expectancies were shorter and bald heads rarer. In our age of appearances not so much. Of 17 male members of Cabinet, two are bald (Chris Grayling and Sajid Javid). Studies correlate baldness with depression; the term “psycho-trichological” is used to describe the feelings of disfigurement, social avoidance and anxiety disorders that often arrive with premature baldness.
The pull test may be used to diagnose hair loss conditions.1 The examiner grasps approximately 40 to 60 hairs at their base using the thumb, index, and middle fingers and applies gentle traction away from the scalp. A positive result is when more than 10% of hairs (four to six) are pulled from the scalp; this implies active hair shedding and suggests a diagnosis of telogen effluvium, anagen effluvium, or alopecia areata. However, a negative test result does not necessarily exclude those conditions. The pull test is difficult to standardize because the pulling force is not distributed uniformly and because it is difficult to approximate the number of hairs grasped, thereby leading to false interpretations.

“I also reached out to Histogen and Follicum a few weeks ago as well thanking them for all their hard work in bringing a safe and effective treatment to people all over the globe with hairloss issues and expressed how much we all value these companies. I held back from asking about market release as you had suggested. I received a very nice reply from Histogen.”


I have only used this twice, but in that short time of use, I believe my hair shedding has increased. In fact, immediately following the last use my hair seemed to be coming out more than I had seen prior to ordering the shampoo at all. Experiencing hair loss, thinning, or excessive shedding (especially for a woman) can be very distressing, and to purchase a product in hopes that it will help to curb or even reverse the issue only to find it exacerbates the problem is INCREDIBLY stressful. I was hopeful about this product, given the overall reviews, but I'm afraid to use this product even one more time, for fear of making my hair loss worse.

"Firstly, even the very good ones won’t get to the root of the issue - pardon the pun - and prevent or treat male or female pattern baldness which is caused by genetics, nor deal with hormonal issues at the heart of female hair loss. But they can help make the hair you do have stronger and healthier. And they can be useful in putting a hair loss regime in place, along with medication like Minoxidil or Finasteride and/ or a hair transplant.


NTU Working To Prevent Chemo-Induced Loss – Researchers from the National Taiwan University have developed a model for preventing chemotherapy induced hair loss, according to their publication in Cancer Research journal. The team, lead by professor Lin Sung-jan, identified a specific type of cell that hair follicles utilize to compensate for the toxicity which occurs during exposure to ionizing radiation (chemotherapy). These cells are called transit-amplifying cells (TAC). Preclinical animal testing with applied TAC-derived progenitor cells showed a 70-80% reduction in hair loss after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Importantly, Sung-jan has recently stated he is in talks with companies about conducting trials on humans. It’s interesting to note that Lin Sung-jan has done an extensive amount of research on hair regeneration in the past. Hopefully this treatment could potentially be used for more common types of hair loss as well.
Pfizer Reports Positive AA Trial Results – A JAK3 inhibitor and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TYK2/JAK1) have shown statistically significant results in a phase 2a trial conducted by Pfizer. The company announced the results on September 15, 2018 at the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology Congress. Subjects of the trial received oral doses of the drugs over a 6 month period. The TYK2/JAK1 inhibitor showed the greater efficacy, improving hair regrowth by 49.5 points on the Severity of Alopecia Tool scale, compared to an improvement of 33.6 points by the JAK3 inhibitor. However, Pfizer has apparently decided to move forward with its JAK3 inhibitor due to 2 adverse events in the TYK2/JAK1 inhibitor cohort during the trial. Pfizer’s JAK3 candidate, PF-06651600, was also recently granted Breakthrough Designation from the US FDA for treating alopecia areata. 
“Smelling” Receptor Keeps Hair Growing – Many of you may have noticed the headlines regarding sandalwood and hair growth over the past week. The research everyone is talking about comes from Ralf Paus and his team at the Monasterium Laboratory GmbH. For the record, Paus is also the main researcher behind the WAY-316606 hair growth discovery. This time Paus et al identified an olfactory receptor in hair follicles, OR2AT4,  which plays a role in regulating hair growth or inhibition. Olfacory receptors are responsible for detecting odors in cell membranes and provide the basis for our sense of smell, they do carry out additional functions though, as demonstrated by Paus. 
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The general medical consensus around laser treatments — caps and combs alike — is that low-level laser light therapy stimulates the cells within the hair follicle. These devices may also increase cell metabolism to promote thicker and more durable hair shafts, something that neither minoxidil or finasteride can do. To use the HairMax Ultima, all you have to do is glide the device over your scalp slowly. Treatments should take about eight minutes, and you should do it three days per week for the best results.
1. Collagen powder. Preliminary studies suggest that marine-sourced collagen may stimulate hair growth, says New York City dermatologist Yoon-Soo Cindy Bae. Though more research is needed, participants in studies reported thicker hair after three to six months of daily use. Crushed Tonic Original Powder ($105) easily mixes into coffee, tea, and water.
The Holy Grail remains a drug that will promote regrowth, but this might not be so far away. Earlier this year, Manchester University announced that an osteoporosis drug had been found to have “dramatic results” promoting hair growth when applied to tissue samples in pre-clinical trials. The resultant frenzy left the PhD student responsible, Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, a little dazed. “Every other week, something comes out about hair loss and it doesn’t generate as much media coverage as what I experienced,” he grumbles. He’s in this for the science – there aren’t many fields where you get to mess around with real human tissue – but such is the distress caused by hair loss and such is the potential customer base that interest is always high.
Regarding the RCH news, is your source more reliable than Lee Buckler since he seems to know more about RCH than Lee buckler himself. Recently, Lee Buckler tweeted “We anticipate seeing data from the RCH-01 study in Japan sometime before year-end but the real answer is whenever the investigators/hospitals in charge of the trial (not us) decide to release the data once it ready”
Beware online stores selling Propecia without a prescription.Finasteride is FDA approved, but buying it online without a prescription can be illegal and dangerous. Prescription-free online stores have a reputation for selling placebos or dangerous replacements. We recommend speaking with a doctor about prescriptions or sticking to save over-the-counter treatments.

Follicum’s origins trace back to 2004, when two Lund University researchers targeting arteriosclerosis stumbled across a modified protein called osteopontin, which grew hair in mice. The researchers knew nothing about the hair-growth industry, but were quickly informed that there were big market demands, especially in Asia. “If you lose hair in Asia, you lose a lot of your credibility,” Jan Alenfall, the C.E.O. of Follicum, said. “This was really a serendipity finding.”
It is no surprise that Donald Trump is obsessed with hair loss. “Never let yourself go bald,” he once told a Trump Organization executive. “The worst thing a man can do is go bald.” During their brief dalliance, Stormy Daniels confronted him about his hair. “I was like, ‘Dude, what’s up with that?’ ” she said, to In Touch, in 2011. Trump laughed. Then he told her that he worried that “if he cut his hair or changed it, that he would lose his power and his wealth.” Recently, Trump’s physician admitted that the President takes the anti-baldness medicine Propecia.
How about if you’d rather not get your head punctured? In Sweden, a company called Follicum is now doing Phase IIA clinical studies and planning to communicate results by the end of the year. The end product will be a cream or a lotion, one that could be applied as few as three times a week. In the first trial, Follicum claims, more than seventy-five per cent of patients experienced hair growth. This is the real dream, the one so artfully captured in the Hims ads: pop a pill, slap on some cream, and get Hair God locks.

Each hair develops from a follicle — a narrow pocket in the skin — and goes through three phases of growth. Anagen (A), the active growth phase, lasts two to seven years. Catagen (), the transition phase, lasts about two weeks. During this phase, the hair shaft moves upward toward the skin's surface, and the dermal papilla (the structure that nourishes cells that give rise to hair) begins to separate from the follicle. Telogen (C), the resting phase, lasts around three months and culminates in the shedding of the hair shaft.


The cause of female-pattern hair loss is unknown, but doctors said there is a strong genetic component. The risk can come from male or female relatives. Though it looks as if the hair is falling out, that's not really what's happening. Cotsarelis said hair follicles are becoming smaller and producing hairs that may be so small that you can't see them.  Women tend to retain more normal, thick hairs than balding men do.
If you have something that works for you, don’t change. Search for products that have plenty of positive feedback and don’t just trust Amazon reviews, but dig deeper. Again, most shampoos that claim to halt hair loss and grow new hair are nothing more than snake oil. Stick with ingredients that are clinically proven to work and backed by scientific study.
"Despite some of the claims, a shampoo or conditioner won’t be able to stop or slow hair loss, nor help with a receding hairline or thicken hair that’s becoming thinner," says trichologist Anabel Kingsley from The Philip Kingsley Trichology Clinic in London. "At best, a thickening shampoo will make hair temporarily thicker for a short period of time, but they certainly won’t help with hair loss or thinning."
Researchers from the NIH and the University of Alabama, Birmingham have discovered a connection between the body’s innate immune regulation and hair graying. It was found that the transcritpion factor known as MITF, which plays an important role in melanocyte function, also plays a major role in hair graying. When the body’s immune system is dealing with a pathogenic infection such as bacteria or virus, molecules called interferons will send out signals to the body to take action against the pathogen. If MITF loses control of interferon response in melanocyte stem cells (due to an immune system response), hair turns gray. Essentially, immune system response may contribute to the process of hair graying according to the study.
Dupilumab is FDA approved for treating eczema aka atopic dermatitis and sold under the brand name Dupixent.  As the story goes, a patient with alopecia totalis (a form of areata which leaves a person’s head completely bald) was being treated for eczema by the drug Dupixent. After 6 weeks the patient first began to notice progress in terms of hair growth and at 7 months she had noticeable pigmented hair growth on her scalp. Notably, the patient stopped taking the dupilumab for a period of time and noticed her growth subsided; when she began taking the drug again the hair improved once more. This provides another useful therapy option for patients seeking treatment for AA. One would imagine a topical version would be worthwhile to investigate.
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