Dr. Carlos Wesley, a hair restoration surgeon in Manhattan, said that women in his practice respond better to P.R.P. than men do, which may have something to do with the fact that women with genetic hair loss tend to have more inflammatory cells around the follicles. From 2013 to 2014, he said, he had an 83 percent increase in female patients, in part because of P.R.P.
Hollywood has made movies about it. Industries have made billions from it. And if the volume of scripture is any indication, the Almighty God must have placed great value on his creation of the head of human hair. After all, He gave Samson—the strongest man of whom the Bible tells—his immense strength through his hair and declared a woman’s hair "a glory unto" her in the 11th chapter of 1 Chorinthians.
As with the Nioxin shampoo, the PhytoCayne shampoo is meant to be used in conjunction with another product, the company’s revitalizing treatment serum. The shampoo is designed to “prepare” the scalp to absorb the serum. For that reason, you’ll find that this shampoo doesn’t really moisturize your scalp in the way the first two entries on our hair loss shampoo list do. What it does, though, is thicken hair for a fuller appearance, and many users say that it also significantly slows additional hair loss and breakage.
Beyond that, things get more controversial, with some doctors saying there's inadequate evidence for other treatments. Saxena thinks there is enough scientific evidence to support some of the alternatives and recommends them to patients. But they are not for women on tight budgets. There's Nutrafol, a "nutraceutical" that costs about $80 a month. Women can also get injections in the scalp of platelet-rich plasma made from their own blood. The first four treatments cost about $2,000 at Saxena's practice in Fort Washington or Lansdale. Maintenance injections, done every three to six months, cost $515 each. Women can also buy Theradome, a light-emitting helmet, for $895 online.  Saxena, who has hair loss herself, said she has had the injections and currently uses minoxidil, spironolactone, and Nutrafol.
Men may also experience some sexual and emotional side effects while taking it: In a study published in the June 2011 issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine, Dr. Michael Irwig of George Washington University found as many as 92 percent of test subjects reporting problems in the bedroom. The study also reported that “the mean duration of finasteride use was 28 months and the mean duration of persistent sexual side effects was 40 months,” meaning that side effects lingered long after subjects stopped taking the pill.
Baldness is not caused by excess testosterone as is commonly thought; nor is it inherited from your maternal grandfather. It’s caused by sensitivity to testosterone: an enzyme converts testosterone into a substance called dihydrotestosterone – which then causes the follicle to shrink and fall out. Male pattern baldness is inherited, but from both or either side of your genetic line. Why men go bald, we’re not sure – though there is a hypothesis that baldness was once a genetic advantage. People tend to associate baldness with virility and wisdom. The bald hunter-gatherer would have been a natural choice for a chieftain back when life expectancies were shorter and bald heads rarer. In our age of appearances not so much. Of 17 male members of Cabinet, two are bald (Chris Grayling and Sajid Javid). Studies correlate baldness with depression; the term “psycho-trichological” is used to describe the feelings of disfigurement, social avoidance and anxiety disorders that often arrive with premature baldness.

Late last week, HairClone officially unveiled its crowdfunding campaign with the Euro-based crowdfunding company Capital Cell. HairClone is offering equity based crowdfunding, which means anyone who makes an investment (£500 minimum) owns equity in the HairClone company. Full details on the campaign are listed in the latest HairClone article on the main page of Follicle Thought.
The general medical consensus around laser treatments — caps and combs alike — is that low-level laser light therapy stimulates the cells within the hair follicle. These devices may also increase cell metabolism to promote thicker and more durable hair shafts, something that neither minoxidil or finasteride can do. To use the HairMax Ultima, all you have to do is glide the device over your scalp slowly. Treatments should take about eight minutes, and you should do it three days per week for the best results.

That meant new products like Hims and Keeps were out.Hims and Keeps are relatively new companies that allow you to set up a subscription for hair loss treatments. Both offer finasteride (after an online consultation with a doctor) or 5 percent minoxidil. However, their minoxidil solutions contain propylene glycol, so we cut them from consideration.


As we wait and anticipate the market release of a new hair treatment there may be times when the waiting gets to us and we feel disappointed, frustrated, and even depressed. This is understandable. However, like many other times in life, a simple change of perspective can lift our mood and positively impact how we feel about a situation. When we look at these companies, are we looking at them as commodities? Are they people who owe you something? Or, are they actually rare groups of folks who are working to bring a gift to your life? How often do you really feel grateful to these companies for the work they are doing?
Chemotherapy is also one of the primary causes of balding among cancer patients, men and women alike. While not all chemotherapy treatments result in hair loss, some that involves the use of drugs like Altretamine, Carboplatin, Docetaxel, and Idarubicin can cause hair thinning and hair fall. In such cases, the hair loss varies from person to person and the dosage of drugs administered. Hair fall doesn't occur at once, but rather after several weeks of treatment until hair fall rate increases after one or two months of exposure to chemotherapy. Radiation therapy as part of cancer treatment can also result into hair loss but typically only in areas where the radiation is targeted.
While techniques have advanced, the bald are no better served, says Spencer Kobren, who runs Bald Truth, a website and podcast in the lustrous world of the alt-bald media. He has learned to be highly suspicious of anything announcing itself as a cure; indeed, he resolutely fails to get excited about RT1640 or the Manchester findings. “I have been doing this for 20 years,” he tells me from his home in Beverly Hills. “When I wrote my book in 1998, they had just found the hair loss gene. There was talk of hair clones. There was a cell-based solution coming out of Japan. It was like: ‘This is it! We’re going to cure this in five years!’” He’ll believe it when he sees it.
He now enjoys full scalp coverage, which he credits to modern transplant techniques combined with Propecia – but when he embarked on what he refers to as his “hair-loss journey”, there weren’t so many options. One trichologist advised him to dunk his head in freezing cold water six times per day; another zapped his scalp with infra-red light; finally, he opted for surgery. “The techniques were far less refined – 450 grafts,” he says. “Now, we can move 4,500 grafts in a single session. It left me with scars at the back of my head. And I committed to more and more procedures. Each time, they were taking another strip of tissue from the back of my head, leaving another scar.” He was eventually “fixed” at a surgery in Vancouver, but in his present role he talks people out of surgery as much as talking them into it. “I wish I could turn back the clock so I never had surgery,” he says.
To us, that meant any product with zero proven ingredients, case studies, or FDA clearance — which shrunk our list by a whopping 180 contenders. That’s right, there are only three treatments that have actually been cleared by the FDA and supported with clinical studies: finasteride (commonly marketed as Propecia), minoxidil, and laser treatments. And, since finasteride is prescription-only, it left us with two.
That meant new products like Hims and Keeps were out.Hims and Keeps are relatively new companies that allow you to set up a subscription for hair loss treatments. Both offer finasteride (after an online consultation with a doctor) or 5 percent minoxidil. However, their minoxidil solutions contain propylene glycol, so we cut them from consideration.

In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
×