But in November, after 10 years of research, Rogaine introduced a new 5 percent minoxidil formulation for women. It’s a mousse (instead of a liquid) that needs to be applied only once a day instead of twice, which means that it can be more easily incorporated into a woman’s evening skin-care routine. Teal replaces the blue and silver palette of the men’s Rogaine, and the packaging bears a lotus flower. (Also last year, Pantene introduced its Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, which is 2 percent minoxidil.)
Anagen is the growth phase. This lasts for about 3 - 5 years, where you can observe your hair growing half an inch every month. Full-length hair from this phase is about 18 - 30 inches long. Studies show that this phase may also be affected by other factors. Asian hair, for example, has been found to have a longer anagen phase. Weather is also a factor; hair growth can be faster in summer than in winter.
Another shampoo which is part of a “system” that includes conditioner and serum. And it’s yet another shampoo which has worked well on its own for many people. The HairGenesis shampoo (and the other products) contains a proprietary formula that is patent-pending, and the company says that the goal of the shampoo is to prepare hair for “maximum growth potential.” It also uses a lot of impressive sounding phrases to describe what the HairGenesis shampoo does.

Clearly, minoxidil is not a miracle drug. While it can produce some new growth of fine hair in some — not all — women, it can't restore the full density of the lost hair. It's not a quick fix, either for hair loss in women . You won't see results until you use the drug for at least two months. The effect often peaks at around four months, but it could take longer, so plan on a trial of six to 12 months. If minoxidil works for you, you'll need to keep using it to maintain those results. If you stop, you'll start to lose hair again.


While not a cure for hair loss, this will clear up the muddy waters no doubt. DNA-testing is just starting to be commercially available and by 2020 you’ll be able to count on the likelihood that it will be much more advanced and affordable. Knowing for a fact at an early age whether or not someone will be predisposed to losing their hair will make a huge difference.  This will help that individual be able to plan, budget, and research their options before their hair even begins thinning.
Hi Ive always had thin hair but about 15months ago I had baby and started to notice my hair was falling out now I’m looking for a solution because my hair is really thin now mostly on my right side and in the back I’ve never thought about how as having to find the right shampoo so I’m like by no means knowledgeable on this so do I just buy these and use them and see if it works for me or what other I’m sorry if im not making sense like where do I start
Minoxidil typically comes in 2% and 5% dosage. With the former, hair growth is not visible up until the fourth month (16 weeks) of use, but it could be faster with the 5% dosage.This is most effective especially if you haven't been bald for more than 5 years, your bald patches are less than 10cm across, and most of all, if the bald spots still have some tiny, fine hairs. Studies found that people who have used minoxidil have observed at least minimal to moderate hair growth. The new hair is typically downy soft, but with continued use, it will grow in thickness as the rest of the hair.
Unlike The Big 3 Shampoo from Lipogaine, The Big 5 does not contain ketoconazole or copper peptides. However, it does have everything else The Big 3 has + 17 natural hair stimulating ingredients. We view this shampoo as more of a natural thickening shampoo whereas The Big 3 is going to be a little harsher on the scalp but better at nuking scalp DHT. Both shampoos are excellent products from trusted brand Lipogaine. We do know of some users that had had success rotating the Lipogaine shampoos and use The Big 3 every 3rd day or so and incorporate The Big 5 into their daily routine. 

A popular skin care drug—which is intended to target eczema—was just found to have an unusual side effect: hair growth. According to an article on Newsweek, the FDA-approved drug dupilumab was given to a 13-year-old alopecia sufferer to treat her eczema. The patient, who hadn’t grown hair on her scalp since she was two, suddenly grew a significant amount of hair on her head after continual use of the drug, a study in the journal JAMA Dermatology reports.
However, each formula contains a different mix of ingredients and will act on preventing the hair loss process in a unique way. Perhaps one of the best things about these anti DHT shampoos is that they are mostly natural and organic compositions with little to no side effects. Probably your biggest risk in using one of these shampoos is a red or itchy scalp, which typically goes away after a couple hours following your shower.
Dr. Carlos Wesley, a hair restoration surgeon in Manhattan, said that women in his practice respond better to P.R.P. than men do, which may have something to do with the fact that women with genetic hair loss tend to have more inflammatory cells around the follicles. From 2013 to 2014, he said, he had an 83 percent increase in female patients, in part because of P.R.P.
Drugs normally used for rheumatoid arthritis and bone marrow cancer, they are now being studied for their uses as a hair growth medicine. These are a new class of medicines labeled as JAK inhibitors. In one study, 6 out of 9 patients dramatically went from bald to a full head of hair after taking Ruxolitinib for 5 months. In another study several subjects were able to regrow full heads of hair. Unfortunately, sustained use of such drugs will have severe side effects. Many of these concerns would be side stepped if a topical formula could be developed. Researchers at the Department of Dermatology and Genetics and Development at Columbia University Medical center are now studying other JAK inhibitors in placebo controlled studies.
Another shampoo which is part of a “system” that includes conditioner and serum. And it’s yet another shampoo which has worked well on its own for many people. The HairGenesis shampoo (and the other products) contains a proprietary formula that is patent-pending, and the company says that the goal of the shampoo is to prepare hair for “maximum growth potential.” It also uses a lot of impressive sounding phrases to describe what the HairGenesis shampoo does.
While thin hair is nothing to be ashamed of, it's perfectly natural to look for a way to maintain the luscious locks you know and love — and the easiest way to do that is by incorporating the best shampoos for thinning hair into your beauty routine. Whether it's due to stress, hormonal changes, or simply aging, thinning hair and hair loss is something we as women all face at one point or another during our lifetimes. But before we talk about a treatment, let's break down some of the possible reasons behind your thinning hair.
After the new article featuring Medipost’s hair growth cosmetic was published, Jay Lee PhD of Medipost, began chiming in on the comments section. He first shared that Medipost is currently engaging in a larger clinical trial for the CM3 product which would include higher scale Norwood’s. Then, in a following comment he revealed that Medipost is developing a potentially more advanced hair growth product as well. Here are his words:

Hair loss can have a devastating effect on people's self-esteem. It's a condition that affects approximately 60 percent of women and 85 percent of men at some time in their lives. In The Hair-Loss Cure, author Dr. David H. Kingsley helps you find out why you are losing hair, helps you choose the right treatments, and helps you cope with the psychological and lifestyle problems often caused by losing your hair.
Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
Beware online stores selling Propecia without a prescription.Finasteride is FDA approved, but buying it online without a prescription can be illegal and dangerous. Prescription-free online stores have a reputation for selling placebos or dangerous replacements. We recommend speaking with a doctor about prescriptions or sticking to save over-the-counter treatments.
Joseph Greco, Ms. Telford’s practitioner, who shares a patent for a process to remove growth factors from platelets, said he gets results in 80 percent of patients, more than half of whom are female. Roughly half of them fly in and out, often on the same day, he said, because the procedure doesn’t require downtime and has minimal side effects. (Small clinical studies suggest further research is necessary but acknowledge the procedure’s “excellent safety profile.”)
Once male-pattern baldness starts, it’s not going to stop until every last hair on your head has shrunk or shed, though the rate at which this happens differs from person to person and depends on genetics. And since the grind of hair loss is unending, it’s important to start treatment as soon as your hairline starts bothering you. If you’re looking for a more quantitative metric, Dr. Paul McAndrews, clinical professor of dermatology at the USC School of Medicine and member of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, assures me that “you have to lose half your hair before the human eye can tell.” (Of course, if you don’t care about losing your hair and are fine with going full Prince William and shaving your head, go for it. We’ve got some recommendations for razors and hair trimmers to help you out on that front.)
Clearly, minoxidil is not a miracle drug. While it can produce some new growth of fine hair in some — not all — women, it can't restore the full density of the lost hair. It's not a quick fix, either for hair loss in women . You won't see results until you use the drug for at least two months. The effect often peaks at around four months, but it could take longer, so plan on a trial of six to 12 months. If minoxidil works for you, you'll need to keep using it to maintain those results. If you stop, you'll start to lose hair again.
3. Nutriceuticals. Rogers recommends that her patients try Viviscal Dietary Supplements ($50 for a one-month supply) or Nutrafol ($88 for a one-month supply), both of which can often be picked up in a salon. The former contains marine-based proteins meant to beef up thinning hair. The latter is packed with antioxidants, like ashwagandha and curcumin, and boasts impressive clinical results.
The researchers from the University of Manchester’s Centre for Dermatology Research uncovered this finding through lab tests. They used samples containing scalp hair follicles from more than 40 male hair-transplant patients. The hair follicles were placed in a medium and treated with the drug. Researchers said that those hair follicles were able to grow again because it suppressed the actions of SFRP1.
NTU Working To Prevent Chemo-Induced Loss – Researchers from the National Taiwan University have developed a model for preventing chemotherapy induced hair loss, according to their publication in Cancer Research journal. The team, lead by professor Lin Sung-jan, identified a specific type of cell that hair follicles utilize to compensate for the toxicity which occurs during exposure to ionizing radiation (chemotherapy). These cells are called transit-amplifying cells (TAC). Preclinical animal testing with applied TAC-derived progenitor cells showed a 70-80% reduction in hair loss after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Importantly, Sung-jan has recently stated he is in talks with companies about conducting trials on humans. It’s interesting to note that Lin Sung-jan has done an extensive amount of research on hair regeneration in the past. Hopefully this treatment could potentially be used for more common types of hair loss as well.
3. Hair fibers. The best (and easiest) way to hide a widening part or sparse patch is with hair fibers. They’re tiny, charged fibers that adhere to your scalp (until your next shampoo). Toppik Hair Building Fibers ($25) come in a range of colors so you can easily find one that matches your own hair. (In a pinch, you can also brush a powdered eye shadow that matches your hair color along your part.)
Giovanni Mele, a stylist who owns Giovanni and Pileggi in Center City, said many women with thinning hair try to wear their hair long. He thinks they're much better off with short, pixie-like styles with light layering on top. He recommends that lighter-skinned women choose colors that are a little darker than blond or gray. He is a fan of a hair-thickening product made by Nioxin.

There’s a lot of misinformation, half-truths, and pseudoscience regarding hair loss, and there are also treatment programs that have been well-researched and tested in clinical settings. So, how do you find the difference? For starters, talk to the experts in the industry like dermatologists and general physicians about treatment programs. Avoid people advertising secret cures, all-natural remedies, and permanent fixes. If there was a way to stop baldness from happening, we’d all know about it already.
What fans say: With a 4.5-star rating on Amazon and over 500 customer reviews, people love this herbal shampoo and conditioner set. One user said, "I bought this set because my scalp became dry and itchy in the winter months. I get my hair colored so I wanted something natural that wouldn't strip the color from my hair. Within just a few uses, I had immediate relief and no dandruff. I highly recommend this product."
One hard truth: Hair loss is mostly out of your control. “Baldness comes down to your genes,” says Frederick Joyce, M.D., founder of Rejuvenate! Med Spa and a member of the International Society for Hair Restoration Surgery. “If you have the baldness gene, there are some natural remedies that may make your hair stronger and healthier to slow your hair loss slightly—but they won’t prevent you from going bald. Still, maintaining hair health by eating well and using the right products—combined with medical-grade treatments—can really work all together to help you have a fuller, thicker head of hair.”

While thinning generally worsens after menopause, doctors said hormone treatments typically do not improve hair growth. Minoxidil lotion or foam, which can be purchased over the counter, is the first line of treatment. About half of women who use it have not lost more hair a year later, Cotsarelis said. Spironolactone, a blood-pressure drug, can also help, doctors said. Some may also try finasteride — approved to treat baldness in men — off-label. The evidence that it works in women is weak, Patel said.
It appears that the gene-editing company Sangamo Therapeutics has an interest in hair growth technology. Sangamo is an interesting company with technology applications in gene therapy, genome editing, cell therapy, and gene regulation. Gene therapy, especially, is at the cutting-edge of medical technology innovation. The company has multiple therapies at phase 1/2 of the clinical trial process for various diseases. 

Scientists from the Indiana University School of Medicine have for the first time created skin with hair follicles using mice stem cells. Research was led by Professor Karl Koehler. The team was able to grow both the epidermis and dermis layers of skin to create a realistic skin model. An interesting quote from Professor Koehler: “It looks like a little ball of pocket lint that floats around in the culture medium. The skin develops as a spherical cyst and then the hair follicles grow outward in all directions – like dandelion seeds.”
On a particularly obscure corner of the Internet, FarrellHair.com, there is a seventeen-minute-and-forty-eight-second video in which the actor Jason Alexander explains why he suddenly has hair. It’s an unexpectedly entrancing bit of work. Alexander displays none of the cynicism of his iconically bald TV character George Costanza. Warmly and earnestly, he pours his heart out to Richard Farrell, the man who made his hair.
Hair transplantation involves harvesting follicles from the back of the head that are DHT resistant and transplanting them to bald areas. A surgeon will remove minuscule plugs of skin that contain a few hairs and implant the plugs where the follicles are inactive. Around 15 percent of hairs emerge from the follicle as a single hair, and 15 percent grow in groups of four or five hairs.
Follicum announced yesterday it has successfully completed the development of a topical formulation for FOL-005. The company had been working in parallel to develop an optimal topical version of FOL-005 while an injectable version of the peptide was being used in a clinical trial. Now that the topical formula is completed it will be trialed in a further phase 2 clinical trial which will likely begin very late 2018 or early 2019.
The best fix by far for replacing lost hair is a transplant. Back in the day, docs used plugs that resembled cornrows (definitely not natural looking). Today, guys have more options. You can go for “the strip method” where a doctor surgically removes a strip of hair from the back of your head, dissects every hair graft under a microscope, and then plants the individual grafts onto hair-thin areas of your scalp with tiny incisions. 

In the following decades, researchers learned that testosterone does not work alone. An enzyme converts testosterone into a substance called dihydrotestosterone, or DHT, which causes hair follicles to shrink. DHT attacks the dermal papilla, the “brain” of the hair follicle, and is the main cause of male-pattern baldness, which affects more than fifty million men in the United States and also—largely unremarked upon, but true—more than thirty million women.
Disruptions in the normal length of each phase, which can cause hair loss and hair thinning, may be the result of a number of internal and external stimuli. These are also what we call the triggers and causes of your hair loss. As a quick example, dieting can leave the body stressed and in need of important nutrients. Because of this stress, hair growth may be cut shorter than usual and there is an early onset of telogen or shedding of hair.
Scientists from the Indiana University School of Medicine have for the first time created skin with hair follicles using mice stem cells. Research was led by Professor Karl Koehler. The team was able to grow both the epidermis and dermis layers of skin to create a realistic skin model. An interesting quote from Professor Koehler: “It looks like a little ball of pocket lint that floats around in the culture medium. The skin develops as a spherical cyst and then the hair follicles grow outward in all directions – like dandelion seeds.”
Joseph and his readership, he said, are convinced that we are at a “peak moment” for the industry. He ticked off “platelet-rich plasma” and “injectable cell therapies” and other high-level technologies that are being developed by companies from New York to San Diego, Tokyo, and Stockholm. He won’t make bets on who’s going to win the arms race. But, he says, “if you were the first, that’d be fun for the trillion dollars that you’d make. Over the next few years? It’s prime time.”
Jimenez, J. J., Wikramanayake, T. C., Bergfeld, W., Hordinsky, M., Hickman, J. G., Hamblin, M. R., & Schachner, L. A. (2014). Efficacy and Safety of a Low-level Laser Device in the Treatment of Male and Female Pattern Hair Loss: A Multicenter, Randomized, Sham Device-controlled, Double-blind Study. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 15(2), 115–127.
The vampire hair loss treatment takes after the vampire facelift, which is completed on the face to reduce lines, acne scarring, and wrinkles. While not a new method, it is just becoming popular in its ability to treat the cosmetic condition of hair loss. This is also known as platelet rich plasma therapy. Scientists reported in the British Journal of Dermatology May 2013 issue that restoring hair growth on bald patches is possible by injecting them with platelet rich plasma.

But, there’s an even more important step to take – your participation and contribution. The topic of “a cure for hair loss” or “a hair growth treatment”, for many of us, is one of the most important issues in our lives. What are you doing to support its success? I realize that question may not have previously crossed the mind for many. It’s here now. For a personal example, I’m not a scientist who creates molecules in a lab, so I decided I would organize the hair growth treatment news and spread awareness. It’s been a gratifying practice for me. 
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
The best hair loss shampoos are gentle enough so that you can use them multiple times a week. Nizoral, however, is most effective when used only a few times a week (and should be left on the hair for three to five minutes before rinsing). But you can also alternate Nizoral with another type of hair loss shampoo – such as the Lipogaine products or Alpecin’s Caffeine shampoo – for an effective one-two hair loss fighting punch. Use Nizoral twice a week while using your other hair loss shampoo on the other days.
In just the past few years, we’ve made remarkable strides in understanding Trump’s head. In March, 2016, with Trump the presumptive G.O.P. nominee, Gawker’s Ashley Feinberg published a diligent and compelling investigation, “Is Donald Trump’s Hair a $60,000 Weave?” It pointed to a high-end clinic called Ivari International that, for a while, at least, had the kind of complicated ties to Trump and Trump Tower that we’d later see in the dignitaries of various hostile foreign governments.
Some 30 million women in the United States have hereditary hair loss (compared with 50 million men), according to the American Academy of Dermatology, though that figure does not include the millions more who struggle with thinning hair because of pregnancy, menopause, stress and other health conditions. Barely 5 percent of women are said to be good candidates for hair transplant surgery because women lose hair everywhere, meaning that, unlike with men, there is rarely a luxuriant spot on the back of the head from which to harvest hairs unobtrusively.
That said, there are products that don’t have FDA approval or clearance, but may help prevent hair loss. For example, shampoos with ketoconazole, a chemical with anti-DHT properties, is widely used to treat fungal infections but has become popular among consumers as a hair loss treatment. It makes sense — research shows that ketoconazole actually has beneficial effects on hair growth (especially for those with seborrheic dermatitis).

Keranique is another line of products targeted towards women. They offer a complete system consisting of shampoos, conditioners, and topicals. Our testers found that it was one of the harshest shampoos and was not always color safe. Their topical foam contains Minoxidil which can irritate some scalps. Keranique hair products are safe to use and highly effective.  They also have an anti-dandruff shampoo that has received amazing reviews. 

Finasteride inhibits an enzyme that converts testosterone to DHT, or dihydrotestosterone, the hormone that causes hair loss in men, and unlike minoxidil, this drug can actually help hair grow back, as well as prevent further loss. All you have to do is take one pill a day, and according to Dr. Evan Rieder, dermatologist in the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology at NYU Langone Health, two-thirds of men taking this treatment will see improvements in hair density over time.
MAX BioPharma, a company working with Hedgehog pathway therapeutics, wants to test its lead compound for hair growth in  mouse model. If data from this experiment turns out to be positive the company says it will reach out to cosmetic or larger pharma partners to commercialize the product. While we currently don’t know how this therapy will fare for hair growth, in the past we have seen impressive potential from stimulators of the Hedgehog pathway.
“While nutritious eating isn’t going to bring your hair back by any means, eating plenty of protein-rich foods and healthy fats can make the hair that you still have look thicker and shinier.” Skimping on the B vitamins in particular can interfere with the formation of hair cells and, therefore, hair growth. The best sources of Bs are protein-packed foods like chicken, fish, eggs, and pork, as well as leafy greens such as spinach. (These foods are also good for melting belly fat, so it’s a win win).
There have also been studies on the effects of 1% pyrithione zinc shampoo and a 5% minoxidil solution. In one study, 200 men between the ages of 18 to 49 who experienced baldness between type III and type IV on the Norwood scale were given this treatment for a six-month period. They found that minoxidil, when used on its own, was approximately twice as powerful as pyrithione zinc at stimulating hair growth, but that both products were successful at increasing the amount of visible hair when used over a 26-week period.
*all photos are models and not actual patients.If you are interested in a prescription product, Hims will assist in setting up a visit for you with an independent physician who will evaluate whether or not you are an appropriate candidate for the prescription product and if appropriate, may write you a prescription for the product which you can fill at the pharmacy of your choice.
The answer, to be brutally honest, is no. Combine that with the fact that many shampoo manufacturers are hungry for a quick buck and make false claims about ingredients that haven’t been proven to work, and you have a market that can be treacherous to navigate. There are even fake reviews – which is a whole additional layer of deceit when you think about it.
If you’re a lady and can remember the one difference in directions (or just scope out the instructions online) we recommend saving the cash. Similarly, you could go generic with Equate Hair Regrowth Treatment for Men or Costco’s Kirkland Signature Hair Regrowth Treatment Minoxidil Foam for Men. These alternatives offer the same percentage of active minoxidil and near-identical inactive ingredients for as little as half the price — a great option for both genders.

Deionized Water, Sodium Laureth Sulfate, Cocamidopropyl Betaine, Sodium Cocoyl Alaninate, Polyquaternium-7, Sodium PCA, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Juice, Apigenin, Biotinoyl Tripeptide-1, Butylene Glycol, Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Fragrance (Parfum), Glycerin, Glycine (Amino Acid), Guar Hydroxypropyltrimonium Chloride, L-Arginine, Larix Europaea (Larch) Wood Extract, Niacinamide, Oleanolic Acid, PEG-150 Pentaerythrityl Tetrastearate, PEG-40 Hydrogenated Castor Oil, PEG-8 Caprylic/Capric Glycerides, PG-26-Buteth-26, Propolis, Sodium Metabisulfite (Antioxidant), Zinc Chloride, Methylchloroisothiazolinone, Methylisothiazolinone, Disodium EDTA, Citric Acid.
Stay away from tightly bound styles, like braids, buns, or ponytails. Resist twisting or rubbing your hair. And gently wash or brush hair, switching to a wide-toothed comb if necessary to prevent too much pulling at the roots. Hot rollers, curling or straightening irons, hot oil treatments, bleaching, and other chemical processes are other things to avoid.
Retin-A, or topical tretinoin, is sometimes used as a combination therapy with minoxidil for androgenic alopecia. It’s important to use this type of medication under the guidance of your doctor. In some circumstances, tretinoin can actually cause hair loss. Some people who have used it at home report that topical retinol creams, serums, and lotions may make hair loss worse.
"Despite some of the claims, a shampoo or conditioner won’t be able to stop or slow hair loss, nor help with a receding hairline or thicken hair that’s becoming thinner," says trichologist Anabel Kingsley from The Philip Kingsley Trichology Clinic in London. "At best, a thickening shampoo will make hair temporarily thicker for a short period of time, but they certainly won’t help with hair loss or thinning."
David made this claim back in 2000. But fast-forward a few years and his enhanced compensation strategy begins to look a little quaint. Androgenetic alopecia, or male pattern baldness, afflicts about half of all men aged 50 and they can’t all reinvent the sitcom. And significant advances in the £3bn hair regrowth industry mean that they have other, seemingly easier, options. The man who is “ideally bald” (to use Vladimir Nabokov’s description of his comic hero, Pnin) may soon become a rare sight.

Other therapies for the treatment of alopecia areata include topical mid- to high-potency corticosteroids, minoxidil, anthralin, immunotherapy (diphenylcyclopropenone, squaric acid dibutylester), and systemic corticosteroids.12 Currently available therapies often yield unsatisfactory results, and some clinicians rely on the high rate of spontaneous remission or recommend a hairpiece or wig if remission does not occur.13
In essence, it is widely known as Microneedling, and it has the power to completely revive your head and scalp from within. It will, among other things, help rejuvenate your scalp skin, help remove old skin cells and embedded oils (sebum) that are currently blocking and clogging your hair follicles, and most of all, it will reactivate the hair follicles in your head to make them grow hairs again. How amazing is that?
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