While some medical practitioners are still on the fence about the effectiveness of laser treatments, studies have found that hair growth using laser therapy increased by 19 normal-size hairs per square centimetre. The regrowth is also observed as thicker, shinier and more manageable. It's a non-invasive, painless procedure that works for both men and women. However, the LLLT is not a stand-alone cure and is thus used in combination with other treatments.
But in November, after 10 years of research, Rogaine introduced a new 5 percent minoxidil formulation for women. It’s a mousse (instead of a liquid) that needs to be applied only once a day instead of twice, which means that it can be more easily incorporated into a woman’s evening skin-care routine. Teal replaces the blue and silver palette of the men’s Rogaine, and the packaging bears a lotus flower. (Also last year, Pantene introduced its Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, which is 2 percent minoxidil.)
The Holy Grail remains a drug that will promote regrowth, but this might not be so far away. Earlier this year, Manchester University announced that an osteoporosis drug had been found to have “dramatic results” promoting hair growth when applied to tissue samples in pre-clinical trials. The resultant frenzy left the PhD student responsible, Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, a little dazed. “Every other week, something comes out about hair loss and it doesn’t generate as much media coverage as what I experienced,” he grumbles. He’s in this for the science – there aren’t many fields where you get to mess around with real human tissue – but such is the distress caused by hair loss and such is the potential customer base that interest is always high.
To us, that meant any product with zero proven ingredients, case studies, or FDA clearance — which shrunk our list by a whopping 180 contenders. That’s right, there are only three treatments that have actually been cleared by the FDA and supported with clinical studies: finasteride (commonly marketed as Propecia), minoxidil, and laser treatments. And, since finasteride is prescription-only, it left us with two.
Aloe vera. Aloe vera is one of the most traditional and common natural hair loss treatments. It is known to possess enzymes that promote hair growth and a healthy scalp by regulating the hair and scalp's pH level. Known as a hair miracle, it is also used to treat other hair/scalp conditions like scalp itchiness, scalp redness, and inflammation. It also helps in minimizing dandruff and making the hair shinier and stronger.
You always hear these stories about people who take a homeopathic approach to fighting baldness. It’s always some off-the-wall remedy like smearing a paste of ginger and cayenne pepper on your scalp three times a day or eating a special type of ginseng farmed only in a rural village in Tibet. We'll go on the record to say that it's highly unlikely that these remedies work at any level.
As I entered a small operating room at Bernstein’s Midtown East medical practice, a front-desk secretary shouted out, “Hope you got a strong stomach!” Inside, a patient dozed in an operating chair, while nurses held a strip of back-of-the-head skin—something like a fat hairy caterpillar—with tweezers. They began dissecting the follicular units under a microscope.
Literally jumping right out of the woodwork, the company “HCell” has announced they have been granted an orphan designation from the US FDA for their novel treatment of pediatric alopecia areata. The treatment itself it described as a “topical Injection by regenerating hair through a proprietary blend of commercially procured biologic and autologous tissue.” The company also mentions having a treatment for androgenic alopecia in the works as well. More info to come soon. News release here. 
McElwee is an associate professor in the Department of Dermatology and Skin Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in British Columbia, Canada and director of the Hair Research Laboratory in the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHI) at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH). A hair research scientist, McElwee is one of only a small group of research scientists worldwide who studies hair biology and associated diseases.
2. Oil-rich conditioner. “Oils improve hair’s tensile strength,” says Paradi Mirmirani, a hair-loss specialist and dermatologist in Vallejo, California. In other words, oils make hair less likely to break under pressure, which is especially important for thinning hair that’s prone to snapping when brushed or styled. Mirmirani recommends using a conditioner fortified with natural oils, like Burt’s Bees Very Volumizing Pomegranate Conditioner, which contains avocado oil ($8), or Honest Company Conditioner with coconut oil ($10). That one’s got an added benefit: “Coconut oil has been shown to penetrate hair,” says cosmetic chemist Randy Schueller, so it makes your hair stronger from the inside out. (Just don’t load up on pure coconut oil. “You might overshampoo your hair to get it out, and then you’ll end up drying your hair and undoing any benefit,” says Fusco.)
2. High-tech regrowth therapies. Laser treatments ($200 and up) expose hair to low levels of laser light, which boosts hair growth by increasing the amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in hair follicles. ATP provides energy to hair-follicle cells, so the more of it that’s around, the more energy hair follicles can use to grow your hair. Sadick says three months of weekly sessions are best when you’re kick-starting a hair-loss treatment.
The cause of female-pattern hair loss is unknown, but doctors said there is a strong genetic component. The risk can come from male or female relatives. Though it looks as if the hair is falling out, that's not really what's happening. Cotsarelis said hair follicles are becoming smaller and producing hairs that may be so small that you can't see them.  Women tend to retain more normal, thick hairs than balding men do.

“Curis (now-dormant company) had performed a lot of studies on targeting the Hedgehog pathway for hair growth with very promising results, however, their compounds caused orthosteric activation of the pathway (turning it on everywhere and robustly which is not safe) vs. Oxy133 which causes a much more regulated and limited allosteric activation of the pathway only in stem cells. This could make Oxy133 a blockbuster. Let’s see what happens.” 
Can an iron deficiency cause hair loss? Iron deficiency anemia occurs when a person does not have enough iron in their body or the body cannot use its supply properly. This can cause a variety of symptoms, which may include hair loss. In this article, learn about the link between an iron deficiency and hair loss, as well as the treatment options for both. Read now
Lately I’ve been receiving a few inquiries from readers about Shiseido and Brotzu release dates. So, I’m going to address the situation here and hope that this will be sufficient until more news comes from direct sources. I estimate that these companies would publicly address the release date of their products by the end of Q3 this year (end of Sept). As consumers we know there’s no guarantees for releases and if one or both of these products reached the market this year it would be a very fortunate situation. So, keep an eye out, but loosen the grip a little. The news will come when it comes. When there is news it will be visible here.
A very kind and talented hair blogger from Japan, Fuji Maru Kagurazaka, recently contacted me and suggested that the blogs aimed at promoting hair growth treatments/cures for hair loss should unite their efforts and cooperate. While I acknowledge that the websites who are focused on this material are each unique and have their own (and sometimes differing) perspectives, I do believe that civility and solidarity are certainly desirable qualities for this sector.  Fuji wrote up this nice article about my website, check it out (make sure translate is on if you are not fluent in Japanese). And, I encourage you to read his other articles. Fuji has a sincere and highly detailed approach to hair growth blogging. His personality is highly welcomed and refreshing to the online hair community.
For those of you who only check the Updates page, there was a new Brotzu Check-In article published yesterday. Giovanni Brotzu will be presenting data pertaining to his lotion’s use in androgenetic alopecia at an Italian hair research Congress this Saturday, April 14th. We hope to see photo results from the presentation. Check back to the Brotzu article next week for updates.
Female pattern baldness: Treatment and genetics While most women lose between 50 and 100 strands of hair per day, this hair is usually quickly replaced by new growth. When bald patches or thinning occurs, however, it may be a sign of female pattern baldness. In this article, learn more about the common causes and treatment of hair loss in women. Read now
Joseph and his readership, he said, are convinced that we are at a “peak moment” for the industry. He ticked off “platelet-rich plasma” and “injectable cell therapies” and other high-level technologies that are being developed by companies from New York to San Diego, Tokyo, and Stockholm. He won’t make bets on who’s going to win the arms race. But, he says, “if you were the first, that’d be fun for the trillion dollars that you’d make. Over the next few years? It’s prime time.”
There seems to be some contention over whether hair products like hair sprays, hair gels and serums can lead to hair loss. What's true though is that frequent use of these products can damage your hair, either make it thinner or more prone to breakage. Limit the use of these products for those occasions when you absolutely need to. If you use hair products with harsh chemicals, especially hair sprays, wash your hair at night with a mild shampoo to get rid of the chemicals.

Christiano is more of a skeptic. Lab results are nice, she said, but “you can grow mouse or rat hair sixteen ways till Sunday. They grow beautifully!” She laughed. “Humans, not so much.” She points out that there’s so much we still don’t understand. For one: Why does the hair on the back of men’s heads stick around, even when all the rest drops? She also counsels caution when playing God with hair loss. Some companies are seeking hair-restoration cures by attempting to modify developmental-cell pathways. Those pathways, Christiano says, “are potent, and so it’s tempting, but you have to make sure it’s well enough controlled that you don’t initiate a cancer signal.”

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