Revivogen’s shampoo is formulated by dermatologists to do three different things: cleanse and revitalize the scalp while fighting dandruff with aloe vera and menthol, moisturize hair and make it look thicker and fuller with proteins and nutrients – and most importantly, prevent hair follicles and the scalp from being saturated with the DHT blamed for causing most cases of pattern baldness.
Thanks so much for the guidance! After further research I have to agree with you 100%. Lipogaine Big 3 does containe ketoconazole, which would eliminate the need for Nizoral, however the shampoo only contains a few hair loss/thinning related ingredients. The Big 5 contains 17 and just seems like a better overall product. That plus Nizoral twice weekly seems pretty solid to me.
Acupuncture is a form of Chinese medicine that has been practiced for thousands of years. Its applications are many, and some researchers believe that it may help with hair loss from alopecia areata. How? The needles inserted into the scalp may help stimulate hair follicles and promote regrowth. More research needs to be done in this area, but consider asking your doctor for a referral to a licensed acupuncturist if this treatment sounds appealing to you. (Learn more about acupuncture for hair loss.)
2. Pyrithione zinc shampoo. Traditional volumizing shampoos will give the hair you have a lift so it looks fuller (we like the sulfate-free L’Oréal Paris EverPure Volume Shampoo, $8). But some research suggests shampoos with the antidandruff ingredient zinc pyrithione can mitigate hair loss that’s caused by conditions like dandruff, says Mirmirani. Try Head & Shoulders Deep Moisture Shampoo ($6), and use a conditioner without silicones — they can make hair appear limper, especially if it's applied near the roots (we like Love Beauty and Planet Coconut Water & Mimosa Flower Conditioner, $9).
In fact, the Japanese government has recently committed to establish a new approval process for regenerative medicine products focused on accelerating approval timelines. As it turns out, hair loss is a big concern in Asian countries. Buckler said some 21% of adult males and 6% of females in China suffer from hormone-driven hair loss.  And the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery’s (ISHRS) biennial survey of hair restoration physicians found that the number of hair restoration patients in Asia increased 345% from 2004 to 2010.
That said, there are products that don’t have FDA approval or clearance, but may help prevent hair loss. For example, shampoos with ketoconazole, a chemical with anti-DHT properties, is widely used to treat fungal infections but has become popular among consumers as a hair loss treatment. It makes sense — research shows that ketoconazole actually has beneficial effects on hair growth (especially for those with seborrheic dermatitis).
“Re the post 10/17/18 I really liked your response to the request made by one of your readers to email companies asking for information. So I decided to do what you suggested and sent emails to Organ Technologies, Rivertown and Follicum (no particular reason) basically thanking them for their work and wishing them success with their products. Interestingly I received a very nice response from Organ Technologies which really surprised me. Correct me if I’m wrong but I think the sentiment is to be thankful and encouraging to what is being done appose to being negative that we have yet to get what we all want.”
Category: Alopecia Areata, Alopecia Pipeline, Hair Care Products, Hair Growth Pipeline Tags: Alopecia News, Autoimmune Disease Hair Growth, Carboxytherapy For Alopecia, Cures For Hair Loss, Cures For Hair Loss Coming Soon, Cynata Therapeutics, Deion Sanders Hair, Deion Sanders Hair Transplant Results, Gray Hair Cure, Grey Hair Cure, Hair Growth Cosmetic, Hair Loss Cure, Hair Loss News, Hair Stem Cell Cosmetic, JW Pharma Wnt Hair Growth, Organ Technologies Hair Cloning, PTD-DBM Hair Growth, Sandalore, Switch Biotech Hair Growth, WAY-316606 Hair Growth, Yonsei University Hair Research
Follicum announced yesterday it has successfully completed the development of a topical formulation for FOL-005. The company had been working in parallel to develop an optimal topical version of FOL-005 while an injectable version of the peptide was being used in a clinical trial. Now that the topical formula is completed it will be trialed in a further phase 2 clinical trial which will likely begin very late 2018 or early 2019.
I must have had about 5 readers email me today about the fascinating research coming out of Yokohama National University in Japan. Professor Junji Fukuda lead the efforts to successfully prepare “hair follicle germs” at large scale simultaneously. Essentially, the researchers prepared a cellular formulation with the right culturing materials to promote successful growth and development of tiny “hair follicle starter kits.” Source article here.  

Due to the concern of several readers, I’ve removed the link to the new Trinov website that has popped up on the net. For now, the website only contains an email address subscription box which really poses no issue to anyone who subscribed. At this time, it’s not confirmed who the actual owner of the new Trinov site is, so use your discretion until we find out more regarding this matter. Until more information is known the website will not be shared on Follicle Thought.
Whatever shampoo you use, look for the following four ingredients. Research, though in its preliminary stages in most cases, has shown that all four can not only slow hair loss but also generate new growth. And keep in mind that the only Food and Drug Administration medications used to treat male pattern baldness are topical minoxidil (a.k.a. Rogaine) and finasteride, more commonly referred to as Propecia. 

"The majority of men lose their hair not through stress, or bad diet, or lack of sleep, but through the genetic trait of male pattern baldness which is hard to treat through shampoos or supplements alone. Women lose their hair for very different reasons, but the argument still stands that a lot of the hair loss products on the market are just offering false hope. That said, there are a few that really work."
FTC Disclosure: We represent a professional research and review team, and on our page you may find affiliate links for which we could be compensated for by clicking on them. https://hairlossable.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to amazon.com.
I’ve recently added a new section of the website which will be dedicated to worthwhile products which can be used in an everyday hair growth regimen. The first product to make the list is the Teslabrush. I’ve appreciated the candid and practical commentary from Teslabrush inventor Bernhard Rudert on what his product is capable of. I’m also in favor of the fact that the Teslabrush does not replace other treatments one may be utilizing, but instead, Bernhard has said it works well with other hair growth treatments and has been shown to enhance them through combination. There is more information and commentary from Bernhard on the Featured Products page. I’d like to hear from readers who try this product, please feel free to share your reviews on how it’s working for you in the HairCell: New Website article where the Teslabrush was first mentioned.
Lately I’ve been receiving a few inquiries from readers about Shiseido and Brotzu release dates. So, I’m going to address the situation here and hope that this will be sufficient until more news comes from direct sources. I estimate that these companies would publicly address the release date of their products by the end of Q3 this year (end of Sept). As consumers we know there’s no guarantees for releases and if one or both of these products reached the market this year it would be a very fortunate situation. So, keep an eye out, but loosen the grip a little. The news will come when it comes. When there is news it will be visible here.
Pura d’or makes a very bold claim with this product: “continued use WILL prevent further hair loss.” While we doubt it will “prevent further hair loss” for everyone, it does have an all-star line up of ingredients. Even if it doesn’t completely stop hair loss, this organic shampoo is certainly the safest for your hair out of our top 5. This shampoo is designed for daily use.
Christiano is more of a skeptic. Lab results are nice, she said, but “you can grow mouse or rat hair sixteen ways till Sunday. They grow beautifully!” She laughed. “Humans, not so much.” She points out that there’s so much we still don’t understand. For one: Why does the hair on the back of men’s heads stick around, even when all the rest drops? She also counsels caution when playing God with hair loss. Some companies are seeking hair-restoration cures by attempting to modify developmental-cell pathways. Those pathways, Christiano says, “are potent, and so it’s tempting, but you have to make sure it’s well enough controlled that you don’t initiate a cancer signal.”
Minoxidil (Rogaine). Minoxidil is one of the most common and popular forms of medication for hair loss, particularly pattern baldness, but also generally used in cases of alopecia areata. It is an over-the-counter drug that comes in either liquid or foam form and is applied on the scalp, particularly on the bald patches, to promote hair growth and stop further hair loss.
Finasteride has limitations though, such as the requirement of daily treatment, a limit to how many damaged hair follicles it can revive, and that it may lose its effectiveness overtime for some people. This drug has shown to be better at preventing further hair loss than reversing it (regrowth). Just keep in mind that some side effects might make the hair loss seem more appealing.
Along with male pattern baldness, there is also a condition known as female pattern baldness, in which hair thins on the top of the head. Less is known about this type of hair loss, but it is more common in women who have been through the menopause. Female pattern baldness cannot be treated with finasteride (as with male pattern baldness), but it can be treated with minoxidil. Minoxidil is rubbed into the scalp once or twice a day and should start to show results after about four months. After ceasing treatment with minoxidil, hair loss should resume within a few months.
I know that Follicle Thought has been very useful and inspiring to companies, doctors, and people interested in hair restoration alike. A one-time pledge to my donation page would make a difference in my life and be very appreciated. To make a one-time donation simply click “Become a Patron” on the right sidebar of my Patreon page. Then you can adjust the amount of how much you’d like to contribute; Patreon will call this a “monthly contribution”, however you can cancel your pledge after one month, hence making it a one-time pledge. 😊 I am thankful to all of you who take a moment to visit the page and make a contribution, it means a lot, especially for the hours upon hours I have put into the site to make the best information available to you all.
Nizoral is the gold-standard in hair loss prevention. Its main ingredient is ketoconazole. The nice thing about Nizoral is that you only need to use it twice a week (because ketoconazole binds to the proteins in your hair so it will keep working many days after use). If you were to use it daily your scalp would be drier than a desert and itchy as all heck.
Thanks so much for the guidance! After further research I have to agree with you 100%. Lipogaine Big 3 does containe ketoconazole, which would eliminate the need for Nizoral, however the shampoo only contains a few hair loss/thinning related ingredients. The Big 5 contains 17 and just seems like a better overall product. That plus Nizoral twice weekly seems pretty solid to me.
It has a very powerful mix of ingredients that addresses many of the known causes of hair loss. Revita contains emu oil and copper peptides, which help your hair follicles absorb the key nutrients in the shampoo. A revision to the product recently removed Ketoconazole, which eliminates dandruff by killing off the fungi that causes it. So if you’re looking for that particular ingredient this will no longer be a good option for you.
Chemotherapy is also one of the primary causes of balding among cancer patients, men and women alike. While not all chemotherapy treatments result in hair loss, some that involves the use of drugs like Altretamine, Carboplatin, Docetaxel, and Idarubicin can cause hair thinning and hair fall. In such cases, the hair loss varies from person to person and the dosage of drugs administered. Hair fall doesn't occur at once, but rather after several weeks of treatment until hair fall rate increases after one or two months of exposure to chemotherapy. Radiation therapy as part of cancer treatment can also result into hair loss but typically only in areas where the radiation is targeted.
I’ve just come across the official press release from Organ Technologies (the biotech company which is developing Tsuji’s methods) regarding their recent advancements in hair follicle cloning. It contains the important information which has already been listed on Follicle Thought, though it  also includes many more details. The press release is titled Organ Technologies and RIKEN Launch Preclinical Tests in Hair Follicle Regenerative Medicine. 
Rogaine’s foam squirts out just like hair mousse and is applied with “cool, dry hands.” Applying means working the foam down to the scalp where you want to see thicker growth — for it to work, “it has to get into your scalp,” Dr. Wolfeld explains. “If it sits on your hair, it’s not really as effective.” Once massaged, it dissolves into a watery liquid that leaves a tingly sensation, “but no burning!” one of our balding testers was happy to discover.

The Rogaine rep we spoke to explained that the different packaging (and therefore different prices) has to do with the FDA-approval process: “We discovered in clinical trials that the hair loss patterns between men and women are different,” she said by way of explanation. “Men typically have that bald spot on the crown of their head, where women generally have a general thinning throughout, but concentrated more on the top of the head. So for FDA approval, we had to come up with two different, gender-specific products, so the directions were more explanatory.”
Rogaine and Propecia, the only commercial hair-loss products that have ever been proven to work, were both discovered accidentally. Rogaine, a topical product known as minoxidil in its generic form, was originally developed as a blood-pressure drug. Scientists do not fully understand its efficacy, but the working theory is that minoxidil protects the dermal papilla from DHT. Propecia, or finasteride, was originally developed as a treatment for enlarged prostates. It inhibits the creation of DHT. Both products have drawbacks. In order to be effective, minoxidil must be applied daily. Because of the hormonal imbalance that finasteride causes, women can take it only if they are postmenopausal. If you stop taking either drug, you will quickly lose the hair you would have lost in the duration of your usage. (Recently, on the actor Dax Shepard’s podcast, Ashton Kutcher confided that he’d stopped taking finasteride. With awe, Shepard said, “I just think that’s so risky of you.”)
Late last week, HairClone officially unveiled its crowdfunding campaign with the Euro-based crowdfunding company Capital Cell. HairClone is offering equity based crowdfunding, which means anyone who makes an investment (£500 minimum) owns equity in the HairClone company. Full details on the campaign are listed in the latest HairClone article on the main page of Follicle Thought.

Because there are a lot of products in the crowded marketplace that claim they can regrow your hair, it’s a necessity for the legitimate ones to have disclaimers on their websites. Essentially, these disclaimers state that the products haven’t been evaluated by the FDA and so can’t be guaranteed to provide the benefits they claim to provide—at least not from the standpoint of the regulators.

Finasteride has limitations though, such as the requirement of daily treatment, a limit to how many damaged hair follicles it can revive, and that it may lose its effectiveness overtime for some people. This drug has shown to be better at preventing further hair loss than reversing it (regrowth). Just keep in mind that some side effects might make the hair loss seem more appealing.


With those pinned down, it wasn’t hard to determine which don’t actually work. Pretty much all the “active” ingredients listed in ineffective treatments — from biotin and zinc to emu oil and saw palmetto — have never been proven, and are instead marketed based on logical-seeming correlations. It would make sense that biotin, a B vitamin readily found in hair, skin, and nails, could help hair grow more quickly. And caffeine is a stimulant that works in coffee, so rubbing some on your scalp might wake some of those sleepy follicles… right?

Hair styling products from shampoo, conditioner, to hair dye, bleach, gels and perm and straightening products may contain chemicals that can damage the scalp and cause the shaft to break, resulting in hair thinning. Beware of these products that contain toxic chemicals such as arsenic, thallium, meadow saffron (colchicum autumnale), and lead. These chemical ingredients can manipulate and disrupt the natural hair growth cycle, for example, shortening the anagen phase of growth. Hair procedures like hair relaxing and permanent waving, while do not lead to permanent hair loss, can damage the quality of the hair and make it more prone to hair breakage.
You always hear these stories about people who take a homeopathic approach to fighting baldness. It’s always some off-the-wall remedy like smearing a paste of ginger and cayenne pepper on your scalp three times a day or eating a special type of ginseng farmed only in a rural village in Tibet. We'll go on the record to say that it's highly unlikely that these remedies work at any level.
Two clinical trials have been ran as a proof of concept for Histogen. Terminal hair count and hair thickness noticeably increased after just 12 weeks. Due to this success, Histogen plans to conduct a Phase 1 Clinical Study in the United States. This will be an injectable which when injected into the scalp will stimulate dormant hair follicles and induce new hair follicle formation (think Botox but for hair follicles instead of skin cells). HSC660 is an ongoing female hair loss trial that will run for 22 weeks and a late stage (Phase 3 trial) for men has initiated in Mexico. Histogen founder Gail Naughton even went so far to reveal commercialization, “We’e in very late-stage negotiations with some huge retail partners,” she says. It may not be a magic bullet, but it would sure be nice to have an alternative/supplement to Rogaine that actually stimulates growth.

What's to know about alopecia areata? Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder that usually results in unpredictable, patchy hair loss. Approximately 7 million people in the U.S. have alopecia areata, and it can affect anyone of any age or gender. There is no cure for alopecia areata although some treatments are available to help hair regrow more quickly. Read now
Hair grooming, but more importantly, having a head-full of hair is as important to men as it is to women. To women, it may be an important accessory of beauty, and for men, it adds to a sense of manliness, enhances their looks and makes them more appealing and attractive to women. Balding to men is associated with aging (only old men are expected to lose hair) and therefore, having hair on one's head is a sign of virility and masculinity. 

Unfortunately, as with the aforementioned minoxidil, you’ll begin to lose your hair again if you ever stop taking Finasteride. Additionally, it may cause erectile dysfunction and other sexual problems in men although that’s uncommon. Men who experience these side effects from taking this pill can reverse them; however, that can take up to three months to occur.
Key features: This sage shampoo and tea tree conditioner set by Maple Holistics is full of good-for-you nutrients. The shampoo is made with Argan oil, green tea, and jojoba oil, and includes anti-fungal ingredients that are effective at soothing inflammation and fighting dandruff caused by yeast. The conditioner is infused with keratin and vitamin b5 for repairing, moisturizing, and strengthening strands, as recommended by Dr. Zeichner. This option is also sulfate- and paraben-free, making it a great option for color-treated and fine hair.
You may not know it, but stress affects your health in a number of different ways. It can zap your energy, make you feel physically ill, and even cause your hair to fall out. That’s right, stress plays a big role in contributing to thinning hair. On its own, stress-related hair loss is usually temporary and grows back over time. However, it can also speed up other forms of hair loss like male pattern baldness.
This is a short-term cure, applied while waiting for hair to grow, and therefore recommended for those with a mild to medium case of hair loss. In addition to being non-invasive, hair concealers and hair fibers are instant and affordable. Like wigs and hairpieces, they are used to effectively cover up balding spots while not getting in the way of growing hair. Compared to wigs, however, they are more natural looking and blend well with your natural hair, therefore drawing less attention when you're out in public.
We know our products deliver the intended results for the overwhelming majority of men and women who use them as directed. How do we know this? Because we have witnessed the results first-hand on customers of every age, race, and hair type. Because we've spent over 10 years developing, evolving and continually perfecting functional hair care products just like this. Because the Veta product line was tested, piloted and proven at select A-list salons prior to being launched to the public.
Licorice root. Licorice is an herb that is also used to treat and prevent hair loss and hair damage. It soothes the scalp and helps with dry flakes, dandruff and other forms of scalp irritation. Mix a tablespoon of ground licorice root with a cup of milk and a quarter teaspoon of saffron. Apply the paste on the bald patches and leave it on overnight. Rinse in the morning. You can do this two to three times a week.
Key features: Ducray's Kelual Anti-Dandruff shampoo is the best choice for hair loss from severe dandruff or scalp issues. Dr. Zeichner specifically recommended the Ducray brand for soothing inflammation and itchiness on the scalp caused by seborrheic dermatitis. At $28 for a 3.3-ounce bottle, this is a pricier option, but people say the heavy-duty formula really works for severe dandruff.
“It all started with a particular drug, Cyclosporine A, which is an immunosuppressant,” Hawkshaw explains. “It’s typically given to transplant patients to stop them rejecting new organs post-surgery and it’s been observed that it enhances hair growth. But the thing is, you don’t really want to give this to patients normally because you don’t want to suppress their immune system. So, I used that drug to treat human hair follicles in the lab to try and identify how it actually worked.”
“While nutritious eating isn’t going to bring your hair back by any means, eating plenty of protein-rich foods and healthy fats can make the hair that you still have look thicker and shinier.” Skimping on the B vitamins in particular can interfere with the formation of hair cells and, therefore, hair growth. The best sources of Bs are protein-packed foods like chicken, fish, eggs, and pork, as well as leafy greens such as spinach. (These foods are also good for melting belly fat, so it’s a win win). 

There’s also a women’s version (Women’s Rogaine Foam) — but a three-month supply costs $22 more online. The only difference between the two products are the instructions; women are instructed to apply once a day instead of twice. If you’re a woman who doesn’t feel like paying extra for marketing, the men’s product will suffice. A cheaper generic version is Kirkland Signature Minoxidil Foam, but with a longer history on the market and more customer testimonials, Rogaine is our first choice.
2. Oil-rich conditioner. “Oils improve hair’s tensile strength,” says Paradi Mirmirani, a hair-loss specialist and dermatologist in Vallejo, California. In other words, oils make hair less likely to break under pressure, which is especially important for thinning hair that’s prone to snapping when brushed or styled. Mirmirani recommends using a conditioner fortified with natural oils, like Burt’s Bees Very Volumizing Pomegranate Conditioner, which contains avocado oil ($8), or Honest Company Conditioner with coconut oil ($10). That one’s got an added benefit: “Coconut oil has been shown to penetrate hair,” says cosmetic chemist Randy Schueller, so it makes your hair stronger from the inside out. (Just don’t load up on pure coconut oil. “You might overshampoo your hair to get it out, and then you’ll end up drying your hair and undoing any benefit,” says Fusco.)
Finasteride (brand name Propecia) is the closest to a hair loss cure pill that scientists have discovered to date. This is a DHT hair loss cure. DHT is made when 5 alpha reductase converts testosterone, and Propecia has been found to be an effective inhibitor of DHT by preventing this process from happening. It works internally, at the root of the cause. Therefore, DHT sensitive hair follicles in the front and top of the scalp don’t have to fight off nearly as much DHT.
“We are extremely pleased with the continued development of the patent portfolio we exclusively licensed from Columbia.  This new issuance continues to expand the breadth and depth of our JAK inhibitor intellectual property portfolio covering methods of use for certain JAK inhibitors for the treatment of hair loss disorders. The issuance of this patent is another step in the development of a robust patent portfolio relating to JAK inhibition and hair loss,”
×