For those of you who only check the Updates page, there was a new Brotzu Check-In article published yesterday. Giovanni Brotzu will be presenting data pertaining to his lotion’s use in androgenetic alopecia at an Italian hair research Congress this Saturday, April 14th. We hope to see photo results from the presentation. Check back to the Brotzu article next week for updates.
But in November, after 10 years of research, Rogaine introduced a new 5 percent minoxidil formulation for women. It’s a mousse (instead of a liquid) that needs to be applied only once a day instead of twice, which means that it can be more easily incorporated into a woman’s evening skin-care routine. Teal replaces the blue and silver palette of the men’s Rogaine, and the packaging bears a lotus flower. (Also last year, Pantene introduced its Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, which is 2 percent minoxidil.)
“I also reached out to Histogen and Follicum a few weeks ago as well thanking them for all their hard work in bringing a safe and effective treatment to people all over the globe with hairloss issues and expressed how much we all value these companies. I held back from asking about market release as you had suggested. I received a very nice reply from Histogen.”

Egg mask. Eggs are one of the riches sources of protein, which is the building block of keratin, as well as other minerals like zinc, iron, selenium, phosphorous and iodine. Mix an egg white with a tablespoon of olive oil and honey to make a paste. Apply it on your hair and leave on for 20 minutes. Rinse and shampoo using cold water. You can apply this egg mask on your hair once a week.
If you’re looking for an au naturel option, look no further. This shampoo has been an Amazon best seller since 2012. It smells great, lathers well, and has no harsh chemicals mixed in. Pura d’or has elimated all the bad stuff from this shampoo—no Parabens or SLS. It does have a ton of good stuff too! Practically every clinically proven natural ingredient that aids against hair loss is packed into this shampoo. Nettles extract, he shou wu (fo-ti), argan oil, B vitamins, biotin, and saw palmetto.
“I think their effectiveness is not as significant as finasteride or minoxidil,” says Dr. Wolfeld, “however, it’s something that can be used quite easily by patients at home. If they use it two or three times a week, I tell them it can help to thicken their hair.” Results can take up to 18 months to show up, so Dr. Wolfeld stresses that patience is a virtue.
Anagen effluvium is abnormal diffuse hair loss (usually abrupt) during the anagen phase due to an event that impairs the mitotic or metabolic activity of the hair follicle. The incidence of anagen effluvium after chemotherapy is approximately 65%24; it is most commonly associated with cyclophosphamide, nitrosoureas, and doxorubicin (Adriamycin). Other causative medications include tamoxifen, allopurinol, levodopa, bromocriptine (Parlodel), and toxins such as bismuth, arsenic, and gold. Other medical and inflammatory conditions, such as mycosis fungoides or pemphigus vulgaris, can lead to anagen effluvium.25
We have yet another biotech research company working on a next-gen hair growth cosmetic product. Their webpage mentions the use of “stem cell culture solution-derived proteins” for hair growth cosmetic products. An imminent release of the product seems unlikely, however it is nice to know how many companies really do want us to have a new product to improve our lives. Website here.

Unlike The Big 3 Shampoo from Lipogaine, The Big 5 does not contain ketoconazole or copper peptides. However, it does have everything else The Big 3 has + 17 natural hair stimulating ingredients. We view this shampoo as more of a natural thickening shampoo whereas The Big 3 is going to be a little harsher on the scalp but better at nuking scalp DHT. Both shampoos are excellent products from trusted brand Lipogaine. We do know of some users that had had success rotating the Lipogaine shampoos and use The Big 3 every 3rd day or so and incorporate The Big 5 into their daily routine.
Patients with hair loss will often consult their family physician first. Hair loss is not life threatening, but it is distressing and significantly affects the patient's quality of life. The pattern of hair loss may be obvious, such as the bald patches that occur in alopecia areata, or more subtle, such as the diffuse hair loss that occurs in telogen effluvium. As with most conditions, the physician should begin the evaluation with a detailed history and physical examination. It is helpful to determine whether the hair loss is nonscarring (also called noncicatricial), which is reversible, or scarring (also called cicatricial), which is permanent. Scarring alopecia is rare and has various etiologies, including autoimmune diseases such as discoid lupus erythematosus. If the follicular orifices are absent, the alopecia is probably scarring; these patients should be referred to a dermatologist. This article will discuss approaches to nonscarring causes of alopecia.
There’s no cure for baldness, but there are ways to hold on to what you've got. The six dermatologists and the clinical studies point to three methods: minoxidil, laser treatments, and prescription finasteride. The key is finding the combination and hair loss regimen that works for you. A doctor is your best bet for that kind of guidance — but we found a few trustworthy products that will work for most people.
As promised, I am providing an update on the highly anticipated development of Shiseido and RCH-01. This may not be the exact update everyone was hoping to hear, but nonetheless, progress and continued development are what we need to succeed. The update in summary is this: according to my source we will be getting the data from Shiseido’s trial of RCH-01 in 2019. There is no scheduled date for the data presentation, but I anticipate it would be within the 1st quarter of the year. 
Dr. Carlos Wesley, a hair restoration surgeon in Manhattan, said that women in his practice respond better to P.R.P. than men do, which may have something to do with the fact that women with genetic hair loss tend to have more inflammatory cells around the follicles. From 2013 to 2014, he said, he had an 83 percent increase in female patients, in part because of P.R.P.
I feel inspired to share on the Updates thread a few uplifting comments I received from readers in the past week. Following my admonition to a previous commenter that sending out short, supportive emails to hair growth companies (without asking for extra information that you know they are not ready to share) would be a worthwhile endeavor and boost morale, I received some encouraging responses from two frequent visitors of this site who followed through on the idea. Their comments are shared below. 🙂
Drugs normally used for rheumatoid arthritis and bone marrow cancer, they are now being studied for their uses as a hair growth medicine. These are a new class of medicines labeled as JAK inhibitors. In one study, 6 out of 9 patients dramatically went from bald to a full head of hair after taking Ruxolitinib for 5 months. In another study several subjects were able to regrow full heads of hair. Unfortunately, sustained use of such drugs will have severe side effects. Many of these concerns would be side stepped if a topical formula could be developed. Researchers at the Department of Dermatology and Genetics and Development at Columbia University Medical center are now studying other JAK inhibitors in placebo controlled studies.
Caffeine – Quickly finding its way in to many skincare products for both men and women, caffeine is a natural antioxidant that not only fights free radicals that accelerate the signs of aging, but also help to stimulate the growth of hair. In fact, in a recent study published on the National Institute of Health (NIH) website, it was discovered that there were ‘growth-promoting effects’ to the hair with regular application (source).
While there are much worse things that can happen to a person than losing their hair, there’s also no denying how incredibly frustrating it can be. There are many reasons for hair loss, including genetics, and even more products and solutions out there which claim to slow its progress while even growing new hair. Finding one that works for you, however, can be easier said than done. But we’re here to help.

A bathroom covered with loose strands or an ever-scrawnier ponytail can be startling but doesn't necessarily mean anything's wrong. By age 50, half of women will complain of hair loss. "As we age, overall hair density changes and individual strands become finer," says dermatologist Doris J. Day, MD. But just because thinning is natural doesn't mean you have to accept it. Here are 13 solutions to help you keep the hair out of your brush and on your head.
Follicum’s origins trace back to 2004, when two Lund University researchers targeting arteriosclerosis stumbled across a modified protein called osteopontin, which grew hair in mice. The researchers knew nothing about the hair-growth industry, but were quickly informed that there were big market demands, especially in Asia. “If you lose hair in Asia, you lose a lot of your credibility,” Jan Alenfall, the C.E.O. of Follicum, said. “This was really a serendipity finding.”
Thanks so much for the guidance! After further research I have to agree with you 100%. Lipogaine Big 3 does containe ketoconazole, which would eliminate the need for Nizoral, however the shampoo only contains a few hair loss/thinning related ingredients. The Big 5 contains 17 and just seems like a better overall product. That plus Nizoral twice weekly seems pretty solid to me.
Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
Kerastem, a company developing an autologous fat-derived stem cell therapy for hair growth, has reported positive data from their phase 2 trial. The results have come from a 6 month clinical trial involving 70 patients. In this study, the patients received a one-time injection of fat-derived stem cells, and purified fat, into their scalp. Kerastem reports an average increase of 29 hairs per cm2 from the treatment, or an increase of 17% from baseline. The press release does mention that the treatment “successfully stimulates hair growth in people with early stage hair loss”, so that is something to take into consideration when evaluating the results. For more info visit Kerastem’s website. 
“The most common cause of hair loss in both men and women is androgenetic alopecia, which is genetic pattern hair loss,” explains Dr. Michael B. Wolfeld, a board-certified plastic surgeon and an assistant clinical professor of plastic surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. The root cause of this type of hair loss is dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a byproduct of testosterone that shrinks certain hair follicles until they eventually stop producing hair.

Hair practices. Our hair is one of the strongest and most elastic parts of our body. One strand of a healthy hair can be twice as strong as a copper wire of similar thickness. However, not all hair types are equal. Unfortunately, hair care practices and styling can lead to scalp damage and unnecessary pressure on the hair follicles, resulting in hair breakage and loss.
Each follicle produces hair for 2 to 6 years and then takes a break for several months. While the hair follicle is in its rest phase, the hair falls out. There are around 100,000 follicles on the scalp, but because each follicle rests at a different time and others produce hairs, hair loss is usually unnoticeable. More noticeable hair loss occurs when there is a disruption to the growth and shedding cycle, or if the hair follicle is obliterated and replaced with scar tissue.
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Some factors that are thought to play a role in female hair loss include high androgen birth control pills, menopause, pregnancy, ovarian cysts, and other factors tied to the actions of hormones. The American Hair Loss Association said it’s important that women who have a history of hair loss in their family to be made aware of the potential effects of birth control pills on normal hair growth.

NIZORAL???? What? Are u joking 🙃? NIZORAL make you loose hair , NIZORAL is not á shampoo is a synthetic imidazole antifungal drug used primarily to treat fungal infections. Ketoconazole is sold commercially as a tablet for oral administration (although this use has been discontinued in a number of countries), and in a variety of formulations for topical administration, such as creams (used to treat tinea; cutaneous candidiasis, including candidal paronychia; and pityriasis versicolor) and shampoos (used primarily to treat dandruff—seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp).
The cause of female-pattern hair loss is unknown, but doctors said there is a strong genetic component. The risk can come from male or female relatives. Though it looks as if the hair is falling out, that's not really what's happening. Cotsarelis said hair follicles are becoming smaller and producing hairs that may be so small that you can't see them.  Women tend to retain more normal, thick hairs than balding men do.
NFL Hall of Fame player Deion Sanders has recently undergone a hair transplant. He has not been shy about discussing it publicly and over the last several weeks has actually continued to put out a slew of hilarious and outrageous posts pertaining to his renewed follicles. For his first announcement to social media, he posted this jubilant and priceless video to his Instagram:
Literally jumping right out of the woodwork, the company “HCell” has announced they have been granted an orphan designation from the US FDA for their novel treatment of pediatric alopecia areata. The treatment itself it described as a “topical Injection by regenerating hair through a proprietary blend of commercially procured biologic and autologous tissue.” The company also mentions having a treatment for androgenic alopecia in the works as well. More info to come soon. News release here. 
When in doubt, read the usage recommendations found on your hair loss shampoo’s container. Those recommendations are there to ensure that you get the best results from your shampoo without causing damage to your scalp or hair. Also, always pay attention to a product’s list of ingredients to make sure that it doesn’t contain something which may cause an allergic reaction.
Involutional alopecia. This one is less of a medical condition (it's not caused by a disease or genetics) and is more concerned with the hair growth cycle. Also called telogen effluvium, this condition is marked by a long dormant phase of telogen than growth or anagen. This type of hair loss is the second most common next to pattern baldness but is also the most unpredictable and difficult to pinpoint its cause. Studies have shown that the dormancy phase in the hair growth cycle is related to a range of factors, including hormonal imbalances, pregnancy in women, stress, diet, etc.
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The combination of silent suffering, public shame and poorly understood science makes hair loss sufferers easy prey – type “hair loss” into Google and you’ll see what I mean. Kobren tells me that he had to remove the personal messaging function on the Bald Truth message board, as users were being bombarded by scams. Meanwhile, the higher visibility of celebrity transplants means that baldness is at risk of being seen as a sign of poor self-care. Many treat surgery lightly – and enter into punitive financing deals. One of Kobren’s recent guests was The Only Way is Essex star Maria Fowler, who complained that surgery at the controversial KSL Hair in Glasgow left her with an unnatural hairline. “She ended up having a hair transplant because her fiancé was having one. She had always thought her hairline was too high. She went in like she was having her nails painted – and it destroyed her life.”
Things get interesting when we discover a patent which was filed by Sangamo in May 2017 titled “Targeted Treatment of Androgenic Alopecia.” As with virtually all patents, the lengthy text of the patent is difficult to read or to create a concise summary from. An intriguing aspect of this news is Sangamo works in several technology spaces, including previously mentioned genome editing and gene therapy, either would make an advanced type of hair growth therapy we have never seen before. One caveat to mention is the company’s pipeline does not currently display any indication for alopecia, meaning the therapy is not fully developed yet, so it will be some time before trials begin. We certainly hope to hear more from Sangamo Therapeutics as soon as possible about their interesting development for hair growth technology.
Alopecia areata. This condition, called patchy hair loss, is the opposite of pattern baldness. Whereas in the former, thinning hair follows a pattern, alopecia areata is marked by smooth and bald patches anywhere on the scalp. The bald patches are circular, and can be as small as a pencil eraser or as big as a quarter. It begins with one or two spots that multiply on other parts of the head. The condition is caused by an autoimmune disease where the antibodies mistake the hair as the "enemy" and start attacking it, resulting into hair loss.
The Holy Grail remains a drug that will promote regrowth, but this might not be so far away. Earlier this year, Manchester University announced that an osteoporosis drug had been found to have “dramatic results” promoting hair growth when applied to tissue samples in pre-clinical trials. The resultant frenzy left the PhD student responsible, Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, a little dazed. “Every other week, something comes out about hair loss and it doesn’t generate as much media coverage as what I experienced,” he grumbles. He’s in this for the science – there aren’t many fields where you get to mess around with real human tissue – but such is the distress caused by hair loss and such is the potential customer base that interest is always high. 

If you’re looking for an au naturel option, look no further. This shampoo has been an Amazon best seller since 2012. It smells great, lathers well, and has no harsh chemicals mixed in. Pura d’or has elimated all the bad stuff from this shampoo—no Parabens or SLS. It does have a ton of good stuff too! Practically every clinically proven natural ingredient that aids against hair loss is packed into this shampoo. Nettles extract, he shou wu (fo-ti), argan oil, B vitamins, biotin, and saw palmetto.
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