Laser therapy is available in salons and administered by a hair professional who has been trained in the procedure. Treatment is usually two to three times a week. Generally, each session involves a short 8-15 minute exposure of the scalp to the laser device. There is generally no prescribed period of time that the treatment should be administered, although the more frequent and longer the duration, the more effective results have been observed. Noticeable hair growth can be observed after 12 to 26 weeks of treatment. The LLLT is also prescribed as a complementary treatment in post-operative hair surgery.
Hair changes about as fast as grass grows, which is to say it’s extraordinarily slow and not visible to anyone checking impatiently in the mirror every day. But during regular follow-up appointments, Harklinikken uses high-tech equipment to photograph and magnify the scalp and count new hairs and active follicles, which motivates users to adhere to the regimen. Too many people give up on treatments like Rogaine and low-level-light devices before they’ve had a chance to work, Dr. Senna said.
Pfizer Reports Positive AA Trial Results – A JAK3 inhibitor and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TYK2/JAK1) have shown statistically significant results in a phase 2a trial conducted by Pfizer. The company announced the results on September 15, 2018 at the European Academy of Dermatology and Venerology Congress. Subjects of the trial received oral doses of the drugs over a 6 month period. The TYK2/JAK1 inhibitor showed the greater efficacy, improving hair regrowth by 49.5 points on the Severity of Alopecia Tool scale, compared to an improvement of 33.6 points by the JAK3 inhibitor. However, Pfizer has apparently decided to move forward with its JAK3 inhibitor due to 2 adverse events in the TYK2/JAK1 inhibitor cohort during the trial. Pfizer’s JAK3 candidate, PF-06651600, was also recently granted Breakthrough Designation from the US FDA for treating alopecia areata. 
Minoxidil and oral finasteride are the only treatments currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Both of these drugs stimulate hair regrowth in some men, but are more effective in preventing progression of hair loss. Although there are a number of other treatments listed in various texts, there is not good evidence to support their use.8
RepliCel is a regenerative medicine company focused on developing autologous cell therapies (or therapies that involve one individual as both donor and recipient) that address conditions linked to a deficit of healthy cells required for normal healing and function. Located in Vancouver, British Columbia, the company has developed first-of-their-kind cell therapies that will, they hope, treat conditions that now affect 1 in 3 Americans: pattern baldness, aging and sun-damaged skin, and chronic tendon degeneration.
However, ketoconazole is still not FDA approved for hair loss treatment, which means it cannot be endorsed or marketed as such. Put simply, ketoconazole likely curbs hair loss, but additional research is needed for the FDA to give it approval. While it is safe to use as a supplement to our top picks, we wanted to recommend products with as much scientific backing as possible. So, we stuck with FDA approved minoxidil or FDA cleared laser treatments. But we’ll keep a close eye on products like ketoconazole shampoos and update as new research appears.
Caffeine – Quickly finding its way in to many skincare products for both men and women, caffeine is a natural antioxidant that not only fights free radicals that accelerate the signs of aging, but also help to stimulate the growth of hair. In fact, in a recent study published on the National Institute of Health (NIH) website, it was discovered that there were ‘growth-promoting effects’ to the hair with regular application (source).
A clinician diagnoses female pattern hair loss by taking a medical history and examining the scalp. She or he will observe the pattern of hair loss, check for signs of inflammation or infection, and possibly order blood tests to investigate other possible causes of hair loss, including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and iron deficiency. Unless there are signs of excess androgen activity (such as menstrual irregularities, acne, and unwanted hair growth), a hormonal evaluation is usually unnecessary.
I recently published an article covering a story in the press of SkinTE helping to possibly save the life of a burn patient (see Articles). In that post I shared an image from SkinTE’s website which shows an application for hair growth. What some may not be aware of is the fact that Dr. Denver Lough, CEO of PolarityTE, has done some legitimate hair follicle research while at Johns Hopkins University. Whether or not this will increase the chances of a “HairTE” product to become a success, we can’t say. However, it may be of interest to recall two peer reviewed articles that Lough and colleagues published involving the proteins LGR5+ and LGR6+ stem cells and hair growth.
How about if you’d rather not get your head punctured? In Sweden, a company called Follicum is now doing Phase IIA clinical studies and planning to communicate results by the end of the year. The end product will be a cream or a lotion, one that could be applied as few as three times a week. In the first trial, Follicum claims, more than seventy-five per cent of patients experienced hair growth. This is the real dream, the one so artfully captured in the Hims ads: pop a pill, slap on some cream, and get Hair God locks.
Some immediately see a doctor for Rogaine or Propecia, seek out over-the-counter miracle baldness cures, or even look into hair transplants. Others, though, take a more measured approach and begin using shampoos which can help slow hair loss in a safe and natural way. Groom+Style has written about the reasons for hair loss in men previously.  The causes of hair loss in women and children are slightly different. You might also be interested in how to keep your hair healthy in other, natural ways.
In the operating room, Bernstein prepped the robot patient for implantation, puncturing the man’s scalp with a long needle. These are the “sites” where the hairs will go. Blood bubbled over his scalp, but the patient didn’t seem to notice. The patient and doctor chatted loosely about summer houses and beers and boats. “Would I be a candidate for a surgery after this surgery?” he asked.
If a pregnant woman comes in contact with crushed or broken Finasteride tablets, wash the contact area right away with soap and water. If a woman who is pregnant comes into contact with the active ingredient in Finasteride, a healthcare provider should be consulted. If a woman who is pregnant with a male baby swallows or comes in contact with the medicine in Finasteride, the male baby may be born with sex organs that are not normal.
Follicle Thought is pleased to announce a new sponsor of this website, Hair Restoration Laboratories, LLC. The company produces quality anti-DHT shampoo and conditioner products. I have reviewed the ingredients of the shampoo and conditioner and find them to be very thoughtful and well researched. Also important to scalp health, the products contain no sulfates, no parabens, no silicones and no artificial ingredients.  

Thanks so much for the guidance! After further research I have to agree with you 100%. Lipogaine Big 3 does containe ketoconazole, which would eliminate the need for Nizoral, however the shampoo only contains a few hair loss/thinning related ingredients. The Big 5 contains 17 and just seems like a better overall product. That plus Nizoral twice weekly seems pretty solid to me.

“I think their effectiveness is not as significant as finasteride or minoxidil,” says Dr. Wolfeld, “however, it’s something that can be used quite easily by patients at home. If they use it two or three times a week, I tell them it can help to thicken their hair.” Results can take up to 18 months to show up, so Dr. Wolfeld stresses that patience is a virtue.
Another shampoo which is part of a “system” that includes conditioner and serum. And it’s yet another shampoo which has worked well on its own for many people. The HairGenesis shampoo (and the other products) contains a proprietary formula that is patent-pending, and the company says that the goal of the shampoo is to prepare hair for “maximum growth potential.” It also uses a lot of impressive sounding phrases to describe what the HairGenesis shampoo does.

It looks like Organ Technologies’ recent announcement of its hair cloning progress has attracted some investment capital. Earlier this week, Organ Technologies issued a press release announcing that they have issued new shares to three new investors in exchange for approximately 590 million yen. That’s a lot of yen. In US dollars this converts to roughly $5.3 million, still a good haul. The press release mentions: 

“The DHT hormone (dihydrotestosterone) can contribute to thinning in women who are genetically predisposed to female pattern thinning,” Fusco says. For those whose case falls into this category, she advises a prescription shampoo with ketoconazole 2 percent, as it has anti-androgenic properties. “Ketoconazole has been proposed to disrupt the pathway of DHT leading to thinning of follicles.”
Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is another vitamin that you can find in a lot of men’s hair loss shampoos. Like biotin, niacin and its derivatives are scientifically proven to increase hair growth when topically applied to hair growth areas over the course of several months. However, it's important to call out that this pilot study used female participants.
Dupilumab is FDA approved for treating eczema aka atopic dermatitis and sold under the brand name Dupixent.  As the story goes, a patient with alopecia totalis (a form of areata which leaves a person’s head completely bald) was being treated for eczema by the drug Dupixent. After 6 weeks the patient first began to notice progress in terms of hair growth and at 7 months she had noticeable pigmented hair growth on her scalp. Notably, the patient stopped taking the dupilumab for a period of time and noticed her growth subsided; when she began taking the drug again the hair improved once more. This provides another useful therapy option for patients seeking treatment for AA. One would imagine a topical version would be worthwhile to investigate.
I noticed significant thinning, and hair all over the sink every morning, from breakage; I use a flat iron sometimes, and my hair is color-treated. I have since started using coconut oil to help manage my frizzy damaged naturally curly hair. It acts as a wonderful styling product, it lends shine and manageability, has also stopped the breakage, you just have to be very careful with the amount that you use. I also use castor oil and rosemary essential oil on my scalp at night and wash in the morning….egg is supposed to be useful for its proteins (must rinse after 20 min with cool water!!) And mayonnaise too, but I haven’t tried that. Best of luck, Friend….
Keranique Hair Regrowth 3-Piece Treatment Set for Women, Lipogaine for Women, Pantene Minoxidil 2% Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, Prominox 1 Hair Loss Shampoo, Prominox 2 Hair Loss Conditioner, Prominox 3 Hair Growth Stimulator, Prominox 6 Leave-In Hair Loss Conditioner, REDKEN Cerafil Retaliate 2% Hair Regrowth Treatment for Women, Rogaine for Women Hair Regrowth Treatment
Hey Frederique, I removed it because it was no longer available for some reason. I’m not sure how well can these shampoos work if you are going through chemo. How you consulted your doctor about it? Ask if minoxidil is safe for your situation. It may be the best solution for your case since your cause for hair loss is not due to DHT. But please don’t take my word for it, consult with a doctor first.

Finasteride (brand name Propecia) is the closest to a hair loss cure pill that scientists have discovered to date. This is a DHT hair loss cure. DHT is made when 5 alpha reductase converts testosterone, and Propecia has been found to be an effective inhibitor of DHT by preventing this process from happening. It works internally, at the root of the cause. Therefore, DHT sensitive hair follicles in the front and top of the scalp don’t have to fight off nearly as much DHT.
“No probs. If you come across any other documentaries in the UK that you cannot view in the States feel free to ask me to watch it and feedback. I think sites like yours give people an incentive to keep looking forward with some optimism. Without doubt a feasible hair loss solution isn’t far away. I think it will most likely be a next gen hair transplant through hair cloning. But what ever it might be, as you said in a previous comment there have never been as many players in the hair loss industry. There will be a few false starts, but one, quickly followed by others will come through. It’s just the wait 🙁 But you never know with Shiseido, Brotzu and Haircell releasing data this year it could be sooner than we think 🙂 Kind regards” – Welsh Dragon
I hope you’re all having a good Friday and feeling good out there. Two weeks ago I posted my first “Feel Good Friday” update which contained a hilarious video of Deion Sanders showing off his new hairline from a 5,000+ FUE procedure he had in 2017. That video is now unable to embed because its owner changed his account to private. Coincidentally, a week after I shared that video I noticed that Deion posted a new video to his own Instagram account of him going back to his clinic for another FUE hair transplant to “comeplete his comeback”, in his own words.
3. Hair fibers. The best (and easiest) way to hide a widening part or sparse patch is with hair fibers. They’re tiny, charged fibers that adhere to your scalp (until your next shampoo). Toppik Hair Building Fibers ($25) come in a range of colors so you can easily find one that matches your own hair. (In a pinch, you can also brush a powdered eye shadow that matches your hair color along your part.)
In 1952, a New York dermatologist named Norman Orentreich invented hair plugs. He removed hair from the back of a patient’s head, where it still grew, and grafted it onto the front. In the decades since, the transplantation process has become more refined. Following the lead of the pioneering dermatologist Robert Bernstein, most doctors perform follicular-unit extraction; instead of crudely ripping up large parts of the scalp, they pluck and move individual follicular units.
I’ve recently added a new section of the website which will be dedicated to worthwhile products which can be used in an everyday hair growth regimen. The first product to make the list is the Teslabrush. I’ve appreciated the candid and practical commentary from Teslabrush inventor Bernhard Rudert on what his product is capable of. I’m also in favor of the fact that the Teslabrush does not replace other treatments one may be utilizing, but instead, Bernhard has said it works well with other hair growth treatments and has been shown to enhance them through combination. There is more information and commentary from Bernhard on the Featured Products page. I’d like to hear from readers who try this product, please feel free to share your reviews on how it’s working for you in the HairCell: New Website article where the Teslabrush was first mentioned.
With those pinned down, it wasn’t hard to determine which don’t actually work. Pretty much all the “active” ingredients listed in ineffective treatments — from biotin and zinc to emu oil and saw palmetto — have never been proven, and are instead marketed based on logical-seeming correlations. It would make sense that biotin, a B vitamin readily found in hair, skin, and nails, could help hair grow more quickly. And caffeine is a stimulant that works in coffee, so rubbing some on your scalp might wake some of those sleepy follicles… right?
7/26/18 Update: After positive early data, various trials of JAK inhibitors such as Ruxolitinib and Xeljanz are underway. Columbia researchers have had positive results with Xeljanz in 11 out of 12 subjects achieving some regrowth with no adverse side effects over 16 months of treatment. Investigators at Stanford and Yale are conducting three trials of oral and topical tofacitnib and Locks of Love Foundation is fuding another ruxolitinib study. At this time, there are about 15 publications looking at JAK inhibitors and their relationship to alopecia and its variants.

“While nutritious eating isn’t going to bring your hair back by any means, eating plenty of protein-rich foods and healthy fats can make the hair that you still have look thicker and shinier.” Skimping on the B vitamins in particular can interfere with the formation of hair cells and, therefore, hair growth. The best sources of Bs are protein-packed foods like chicken, fish, eggs, and pork, as well as leafy greens such as spinach. (These foods are also good for melting belly fat, so it’s a win win).
Clearly, minoxidil is not a miracle drug. While it can produce some new growth of fine hair in some — not all — women, it can't restore the full density of the lost hair. It's not a quick fix, either for hair loss in women . You won't see results until you use the drug for at least two months. The effect often peaks at around four months, but it could take longer, so plan on a trial of six to 12 months. If minoxidil works for you, you'll need to keep using it to maintain those results. If you stop, you'll start to lose hair again.
There have been recent discussions on Italian hair forum websites that indicate the Brotzu lotion may very well be moving ahead and preparing for imminent release. After commenter “Ahmed” brought it to my attention, I went back to check the Bellicapelli forum (the site which had the information on the Brotzu presentation at the Sitri Congress in April). I found a response from user “carlitos71” on this page which seems to display the new theories on the Brotzu lotion.

In this section we discuss some of the future hair loss solutions that will be coming out in the coming years. There are a few hair loss cures coming in or around 2020, and hopefully there will be a mass market solution. It is no surprise that ‘hair loss cures 2020’ is an extremely popular search term in Google. You’d think by that time we’d figure out how to stop hairs from falling out of heads.

In the operating room, Bernstein prepped the robot patient for implantation, puncturing the man’s scalp with a long needle. These are the “sites” where the hairs will go. Blood bubbled over his scalp, but the patient didn’t seem to notice. The patient and doctor chatted loosely about summer houses and beers and boats. “Would I be a candidate for a surgery after this surgery?” he asked.


I have only used this twice, but in that short time of use, I believe my hair shedding has increased. In fact, immediately following the last use my hair seemed to be coming out more than I had seen prior to ordering the shampoo at all. Experiencing hair loss, thinning, or excessive shedding (especially for a woman) can be very distressing, and to purchase a product in hopes that it will help to curb or even reverse the issue only to find it exacerbates the problem is INCREDIBLY stressful. I was hopeful about this product, given the overall reviews, but I'm afraid to use this product even one more time, for fear of making my hair loss worse.

There’s also a women’s version (Women’s Rogaine Foam) — but a three-month supply costs $22 more online. The only difference between the two products are the instructions; women are instructed to apply once a day instead of twice. If you’re a woman who doesn’t feel like paying extra for marketing, the men’s product will suffice. A cheaper generic version is Kirkland Signature Minoxidil Foam, but with a longer history on the market and more customer testimonials, Rogaine is our first choice.
3. Nutriceuticals. Rogers recommends that her patients try Viviscal Dietary Supplements ($50 for a one-month supply) or Nutrafol ($88 for a one-month supply), both of which can often be picked up in a salon. The former contains marine-based proteins meant to beef up thinning hair. The latter is packed with antioxidants, like ashwagandha and curcumin, and boasts impressive clinical results.
While you won’t find a miracle shampoo on the market, nioxin and some other products can help keep your scalp in tip-top shape to improve the look of any hairs you do have left on your head. In fact, feeding your hair with the proper nutrients both inside and out can make it appear healthier, so you might consider using products with natural herbs, such as rosemary and mint.
While you won’t find a miracle shampoo on the market, nioxin and some other products can help keep your scalp in tip-top shape to improve the look of any hairs you do have left on your head. In fact, feeding your hair with the proper nutrients both inside and out can make it appear healthier, so you might consider using products with natural herbs, such as rosemary and mint.
Female pattern baldness: Treatment and genetics While most women lose between 50 and 100 strands of hair per day, this hair is usually quickly replaced by new growth. When bald patches or thinning occurs, however, it may be a sign of female pattern baldness. In this article, learn more about the common causes and treatment of hair loss in women. Read now
You may not know it, but stress affects your health in a number of different ways. It can zap your energy, make you feel physically ill, and even cause your hair to fall out. That’s right, stress plays a big role in contributing to thinning hair. On its own, stress-related hair loss is usually temporary and grows back over time. However, it can also speed up other forms of hair loss like male pattern baldness.
Minoxidil and oral finasteride are the only treatments currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Both of these drugs stimulate hair regrowth in some men, but are more effective in preventing progression of hair loss. Although there are a number of other treatments listed in various texts, there is not good evidence to support their use.8
"Despite some of the claims, a shampoo or conditioner won’t be able to stop or slow hair loss, nor help with a receding hairline or thicken hair that’s becoming thinner," says trichologist Anabel Kingsley from The Philip Kingsley Trichology Clinic in London. "At best, a thickening shampoo will make hair temporarily thicker for a short period of time, but they certainly won’t help with hair loss or thinning."
Hair loss is more common than you think and it can happen to anyone. According to Michele J Farber, MD of Schweiger Dermatology Group in NYC, causes range from, “androgenetic or hormone-related hair loss, stress related-hair loss, also called telogen effluvium, and dandruff. Medications, vitamin deficiencies, thyroid disorders, excess styling, and autoimmune disorders can also cause hair loss and thinning.” But the good news is, there are viable solutions, starting with topical growth treatments.
We've heard it all before: clients waking up one day in shock after discovering a coin-sized bald spot on their heads; women agonizing over the strands of hair they see on the shower floor; men looking for topical creams and shampoos to prevent the early onset of balding. Even more are tales of men and women on the search for the perfect wig or toupee to cover up the loss of their hair as a result of medication for a chronic illness.
RepliCel is a regenerative medicine company focused on developing autologous cell therapies (or therapies that involve one individual as both donor and recipient) that address conditions linked to a deficit of healthy cells required for normal healing and function. Located in Vancouver, British Columbia, the company has developed first-of-their-kind cell therapies that will, they hope, treat conditions that now affect 1 in 3 Americans: pattern baldness, aging and sun-damaged skin, and chronic tendon degeneration.
The HairMax Ultima 12 LaserComb ($395) makes for a great addition to any hair loss regimen — provided you can afford it. Dr. Wolfeld notes that it’s a popular option in his practice. “Some people like the action of combing something through their hair,” he says. “They find that to be a little bit easier to do as part of their routine in the morning.” Dr. Khadavi also recommends using a laser treatment of some kind in conjunction with other treatments. “Lasers do help in stimulating the hair into the growth phase. We don’t know the exact mechanism of how it works, but it definitely helps.”
Hair loss is something that affects a huge proportion of men, and yet unfortunately there is no cure. Though you may have heard of certain medicines such as Propecia (finasteride) or Regaine (minoxidil), it is far more accurate to think of these medicines as effective long-term treatments. There are interesting experimental options being trialled currently, yet these established treatments can be effective at preventing hair loss in up to 90% of men.
In their research, the doctors established a correlation between androgen hormones and hair loss. They found that for reasons not completely understood, some people are susceptible to androgens that attack the hair follicles, while others are not. “They found that the androgen hormone decimates the cell population at the base of the hair follicles,” Buckler said. “The hormone attaches to these cells throughout particular receptors and starts to attack.”
There’s a lot of misinformation, half-truths, and pseudoscience regarding hair loss, and there are also treatment programs that have been well-researched and tested in clinical settings. So, how do you find the difference? For starters, talk to the experts in the industry like dermatologists and general physicians about treatment programs. Avoid people advertising secret cures, all-natural remedies, and permanent fixes. If there was a way to stop baldness from happening, we’d all know about it already. 

3. Hair fibers. The best (and easiest) way to hide a widening part or sparse patch is with hair fibers. They’re tiny, charged fibers that adhere to your scalp (until your next shampoo). Toppik Hair Building Fibers ($25) come in a range of colors so you can easily find one that matches your own hair. (In a pinch, you can also brush a powdered eye shadow that matches your hair color along your part.)
A few studies support the use of red ginseng, sometimes called panax ginseng (about $25), for hair regrowth. It can have an anti-apoptotic effect on the hair, Rogers says, meaning it slows cell death so hair follicles can grow for a longer period of time. But before taking any of these supplements, it’s important to consult your doctor; a lab test can confirm whether you need a particular supplement or if taking it will just be a waste of time and money.
As we wait and anticipate the market release of a new hair treatment there may be times when the waiting gets to us and we feel disappointed, frustrated, and even depressed. This is understandable. However, like many other times in life, a simple change of perspective can lift our mood and positively impact how we feel about a situation. When we look at these companies, are we looking at them as commodities? Are they people who owe you something? Or, are they actually rare groups of folks who are working to bring a gift to your life? How often do you really feel grateful to these companies for the work they are doing?
Generally, hair problems, especially hair thinning and hair loss, occur around the anagen phase or the resting phase. As we age, the length of the anagen phase also decreases as the hair follicles receive less and less nourishment from the body. The result is hair that is weaker and thinner after every cycle. In some cases, the hair enters the resting phase too early (or the catagen phase is too short) and this is when excessive shedding also happens.
Beyond that, things get more controversial, with some doctors saying there's inadequate evidence for other treatments. Saxena thinks there is enough scientific evidence to support some of the alternatives and recommends them to patients. But they are not for women on tight budgets. There's Nutrafol, a "nutraceutical" that costs about $80 a month. Women can also get injections in the scalp of platelet-rich plasma made from their own blood. The first four treatments cost about $2,000 at Saxena's practice in Fort Washington or Lansdale. Maintenance injections, done every three to six months, cost $515 each. Women can also buy Theradome, a light-emitting helmet, for $895 online.  Saxena, who has hair loss herself, said she has had the injections and currently uses minoxidil, spironolactone, and Nutrafol.
4. Tinted dry shampoo. Camouflage spots where you’re seeing more scalp than you want to (your hairline, a widening part, a thinning crown) and add volume with a colored dry shampoo (try Orlando Pita Color Boost Dry Shampoo in Light or Dark Tones, $22). But be sure to give your scalp a vigorous shampoo during your next shower — dermatologists recommend keeping your scalp free of styling products so you’re not clogging already taxed pores.
McElwee is an associate professor in the Department of Dermatology and Skin Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in British Columbia, Canada and director of the Hair Research Laboratory in the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHI) at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH). A hair research scientist, McElwee is one of only a small group of research scientists worldwide who studies hair biology and associated diseases.

Alexey Terskikh PhD of Sanford Burnham Prebys research institute has news to share about his hair follicle research. The Articles page gives you all the highlights on what advancements Terskikh has made over the past three years and when he is planning to take his cloning method to FDA human trials. This is one example of a peer reviewed journal article which actually developed to human translation in a timely manner. Happy Friday

Finasteride has limitations though, such as the requirement of daily treatment, a limit to how many damaged hair follicles it can revive, and that it may lose its effectiveness overtime for some people. This drug has shown to be better at preventing further hair loss than reversing it (regrowth). Just keep in mind that some side effects might make the hair loss seem more appealing.
2. Volumizing shampoos and treatments. Typically, these work by depositing ingredients, like wheat protein and keratin, that adhere to the hair shaft to a) thicken it and b) create spaces between hairs so you look like you have more of it. Try Kiehl’s Rice & Wheat Volumizing Shampoo ($18) with hydrolyzed wheat protein; Rogers likes Redken Cerafill Defy Shampoo and Conditioner ($20 each) with ceramides that bulk up hair.
Central centrifugal cicatricial (scarring) alopecia: This type of hair loss occurs most often in women of African descent. It begins in the center of the scalp. As it progresses, the hair loss radiates out from the center of the scalp. The affected scalp becomes smooth and shiny. The hair loss can be very slow or rapid. When hair loss occurs quickly, the person may have tingling, burning, pain, or itching on the scalp. Treatment may help the hair re-grow if scarring has not occurred.
Hair multiplication. Similar to the idea of cloning, this treatment involves taking out donor cells from the hair follicles and then growing and multiplying them in a laboratory. Once sufficient samples have been multiplied, these hair cells are then injected into the bald patches to stimulate hair growth. As a relatively new treatment, hair cloning is still in its research phase.
There seems to be some contention over whether hair products like hair sprays, hair gels and serums can lead to hair loss. What's true though is that frequent use of these products can damage your hair, either make it thinner or more prone to breakage. Limit the use of these products for those occasions when you absolutely need to. If you use hair products with harsh chemicals, especially hair sprays, wash your hair at night with a mild shampoo to get rid of the chemicals.
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