There have been recent discussions on Italian hair forum websites that indicate the Brotzu lotion may very well be moving ahead and preparing for imminent release. After commenter “Ahmed” brought it to my attention, I went back to check the Bellicapelli forum (the site which had the information on the Brotzu presentation at the Sitri Congress in April). I found a response from user “carlitos71” on this page which seems to display the new theories on the Brotzu lotion.
Another shampoo which is part of a “system” that includes conditioner and serum. And it’s yet another shampoo which has worked well on its own for many people. The HairGenesis shampoo (and the other products) contains a proprietary formula that is patent-pending, and the company says that the goal of the shampoo is to prepare hair for “maximum growth potential.” It also uses a lot of impressive sounding phrases to describe what the HairGenesis shampoo does.
The Hair Stimulator is a shampoo from the new, fresh & hip brand Hims. The branding is really on point but let’s dig into the ingredients. Biotin, nettle leaf, tea tree and salicylic acid are the noteables. There’s some evidence to indicate that biotin and salicylic acid reduce scalp DHT levels. Additionally, Hims offers a comprehensive hair loss kit (includes the shampoo) for about $40 bucks a month that gets you hair loss prevention on multiple fronts.
This video is equally hilarious. Once again, there is inspiration here. Deion had a 5,000+ FUE last year and received good results from it. But he’s not done yet, he has the resources to have another procedure and get as close as he can to the result that he really wants, so he did. Surely, he’s just about maxing-out his donor area now. Once again, congratulations to Deion for pursuing his hair growth goals. Enjoy the video and have a big laugh. OOOOeeee.
I’ve just come across the official press release from Organ Technologies (the biotech company which is developing Tsuji’s methods) regarding their recent advancements in hair follicle cloning. It contains the important information which has already been listed on Follicle Thought, though it  also includes many more details. The press release is titled Organ Technologies and RIKEN Launch Preclinical Tests in Hair Follicle Regenerative Medicine. 

RiverTown Therapeutics is in the Follicum camp: RT1640, the compound that David Weinstein developed, is applied topically. Compared to the aforementioned companies, though, RiverTown is way behind. Weinstein and his business partner, Michael Altman, are currently looking for investors to fund clinical trials. But only they have the flashy declaration that the founder has managed to grow back his own hair. Through coverage on sites like Follicle Thought, RiverTown is now a cult favorite in the hair-loss community.


Our hair is part of what we call the integumentary system of the human body, which also includes the skin and nails. Hair is, in fact, a type of modified skin. It is made up of keratin, a form of protein, and is produced in tunnel-like structures in the skin called follicles. Inside the hair follicle is the hair bulb that is comprised of cells that deposit keratin and melanin, which is responsible for giving your hair its color. The hair that breaks through your skin from the follicle is the hair shaft. The shaft is basically composed of dead cells comprised of keratin fibres. In fact, the totality of hair on our head is a huge lump of dead cells, which explains why we don't experience any pain when we go for a haircut.
The patient, a small, vaguely European man in his late forties, had rings on his fingers and a bloody, rectangular gash on the back of his head. It looked like a chunk of missing carpet. Bernstein pointed at the white opening of exposed scalp, and explained how easy it would be to stitch skin together over the gap. This was a traditional process for follicular-unit transplantation. Then Bernstein led me into a second room, where another patient was seated with his face in a massage-table-like padded hole. A portion of the back of his head was marked off. To his right was a boxy gray machine, roughly four feet by four feet, with a jutting mechanical arm. This was the ARTAS Robotic Hair Transplant.

A study led by Dr. Noha Doghaim of Tanta University in Egypt showed that carboxytherapy may be a promising treatment option for both alopecia areata and androgenic alopecia. The study comprised 80 subjects who were treated over the period of three months with either placebo or carboxytherapy.  Both groups found favorable results from the carboxytherapy, however during a follow-up examination the improvements in androgenic alopecia subjects had decreased over time. The researchers noted that continual treatments would be necessary to maintain and bolster the benefits for AGA.


Dr. Carlos Wesley, a hair restoration surgeon in Manhattan, said that women in his practice respond better to P.R.P. than men do, which may have something to do with the fact that women with genetic hair loss tend to have more inflammatory cells around the follicles. From 2013 to 2014, he said, he had an 83 percent increase in female patients, in part because of P.R.P.
Women with androgenic alopecia may consider trying prescription ketoconazole at a strength of 2 percent. This drug comes in the form of a shampoo and also goes by the name Nizoral. It’s an antifungal agent and may help reduce the body’s production of testosterone and other androgens that lead to hair loss. You can also find 1 percent strength at your local pharmacy, but it may not be as effective.
Men’s Rogaine Extra Strength Solution is the liquid version of our top pick. It didn’t make our final cut because it includes propylene glycol, which causes irritation in roughly one-third of its users. With that said, Dr. Wolfeld finds that it can be even more effective in practical daily use. In his experience, “the solution can penetrate and get into your scalp a little bit better” than the foam — especially if you’re not taking the time and effort to apply the foam correctly. This seems crazy to us since the foam so quickly dissolved into a liquid in our tests, but if you’re worried, try a one-month supply of the liquid and make the switch to foam if you notice any irritation. 

McElwee is an associate professor in the Department of Dermatology and Skin Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in British Columbia, Canada and director of the Hair Research Laboratory in the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHI) at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH). A hair research scientist, McElwee is one of only a small group of research scientists worldwide who studies hair biology and associated diseases.
“Re the post 10/17/18 I really liked your response to the request made by one of your readers to email companies asking for information. So I decided to do what you suggested and sent emails to Organ Technologies, Rivertown and Follicum (no particular reason) basically thanking them for their work and wishing them success with their products. Interestingly I received a very nice response from Organ Technologies which really surprised me. Correct me if I’m wrong but I think the sentiment is to be thankful and encouraging to what is being done appose to being negative that we have yet to get what we all want.”
DH—or as it’s less commonly known, Dihydrotestosterone—is the bodily byproduct that (in the TL;DR explanation) shrinks hair follicles until they’re so thin and short they just fall out. Keranique’s unique blend includes a DHT-inhibitor, which penetrates the scalp and follicles to deliver a keratin amino complex, developed to add resilience and protection. This one can contribute to improved texture, healthier strands, and yes, even new growth.
Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). In this method, instead of taking out a whole sample strip, small, individual follicle grafts are cut using a machine and then transplanted. The process is more tedious and more time-consuming, but has been known to have a higher recovery rate and there are no risks of scarring because no cuts and stitches are required.
"Firstly, even the very good ones won’t get to the root of the issue - pardon the pun - and prevent or treat male or female pattern baldness which is caused by genetics, nor deal with hormonal issues at the heart of female hair loss. But they can help make the hair you do have stronger and healthier. And they can be useful in putting a hair loss regime in place, along with medication like Minoxidil or Finasteride and/ or a hair transplant.
A clinical researcher who has spent decades researching the fields of pattern hair loss, alopecia areata, endocrinology of the hair follicle and hair follicle morphogenesis, Hoffmann works in his private practice, as a teaching professor in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Marburg and as a researcher on histopathology on hair diseases. He has participated in dozens of clinical hair studies and is the inventor of TrichoScan®, a computerized technique to measure hair growth.
But the male propensity to internalise their feelings often leaves them particularly vulnerable. “I know guys who have changed their career paths because of their hair loss,” says Kobren. “I know a lawyer who began delivering potato chips so he could wear a cap to work. I know an NYPD officer who was so devastated by a bad transplant, he had to retire and he ended up on disability benefit.”
I’m so grateful for stumbling across this post, so thank you, Dormen! It is exceedingly difficult to find articles like this where there isn’t an obvious kickback in play, They tend to recommend products (.e.g, Pura d’Or) that are clearly not ideal for hair loss and thinning. One product to avoid, if you haven’t previously referenced it, is Pronexa. They have been increasingly exposed as a semi-scam since they offer free products in exchange for 5-star Amazon reviews. Though the shampoo/conditioner are fine as just that, after 3 months of use I seriously doubt their efficacy relating to hair loss and thinning.

Other therapies for the treatment of alopecia areata include topical mid- to high-potency corticosteroids, minoxidil, anthralin, immunotherapy (diphenylcyclopropenone, squaric acid dibutylester), and systemic corticosteroids.12 Currently available therapies often yield unsatisfactory results, and some clinicians rely on the high rate of spontaneous remission or recommend a hairpiece or wig if remission does not occur.13
Since PhytoCayne Revitalizing shampoo is so watery, it’s easy to overpour and waste a good amount of this expensive product. That’s one reason we rank it below Revivogen and Nioxin. The more important reason for the #3 ranking is that this shampoo doesn’t do everything that the other two products do. It’s still effective for most users, however, and worth a try.
Minoxidil typically comes in 2% and 5% dosage. With the former, hair growth is not visible up until the fourth month (16 weeks) of use, but it could be faster with the 5% dosage.This is most effective especially if you haven't been bald for more than 5 years, your bald patches are less than 10cm across, and most of all, if the bald spots still have some tiny, fine hairs. Studies found that people who have used minoxidil have observed at least minimal to moderate hair growth. The new hair is typically downy soft, but with continued use, it will grow in thickness as the rest of the hair.
Aclaris Therapeutics, the company who acquired the rights from Angela Christiano to use JAK inhibitors in alopecia disorders, is currently involved in a wide range of alopecia trials. The company has multiple ongoing trials for alopecia areata, including a trial for eyebrow regrowth, and also a new trial planned for AGA or androgenic alopecia. Full article here.

Follicle Thought is interested in connecting with scientists and startups who are working on hair growth or hair loss prevention research. If you or a colleague is working on hair growth please get in touch on the Contact page, even if you are not ready to share news on the site yet. Follicle Thought can offer networking and other resources to benefit your development. Thanks


When you're investing considerable time and money on a mix of hair treatments and cures, the last things you should be doing are those that will only aggravate your condition. Likewise, when your hair has finally grown back, the last thing you would want is for you to go through another horrific episode of hair loss. Preventing further - or another case of hair loss, and stopping it before it actually happens should be your goal.
Laser devices: Brushes, combs, and other hand-held devices that emit laser light might stimulate hair growth. These devices might make hair look more youthful in some people. Because the FDA classifies these products as medical devices, the products do not undergo the rigorous testing that medicines undergo. The long-term effectiveness and safety for these devices are not known.

One of the downsides to the product is that you pay hand over foot for all those special ingredients DS packed into this bottle. It’s not the cheap crap that most manufacturers throw into your standard shampoos. It is expensive stuff, and using it daily means there’s no real way of making it last a long time either. The bottom line is you have to bite the bullet but with all the ingredients in this bottle, you’re getting your money’s worth.
With those pinned down, it wasn’t hard to determine which don’t actually work. Pretty much all the “active” ingredients listed in ineffective treatments — from biotin and zinc to emu oil and saw palmetto — have never been proven, and are instead marketed based on logical-seeming correlations. It would make sense that biotin, a B vitamin readily found in hair, skin, and nails, could help hair grow more quickly. And caffeine is a stimulant that works in coffee, so rubbing some on your scalp might wake some of those sleepy follicles… right?
Aside from medication and lasers, some opt for hair transplants — a procedure where hairs are removed from another part of your body and then transplanted to the thinning or balding areas. Does it work? In a word, yes. Research suggests that most hair transplant recipients report are "very satisfied" with their results. While successful, transplants are also far more expensive than medications, foams, or lasers with costs averaging anywhere from $4,000 or $15,000.
Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). In this method, instead of taking out a whole sample strip, small, individual follicle grafts are cut using a machine and then transplanted. The process is more tedious and more time-consuming, but has been known to have a higher recovery rate and there are no risks of scarring because no cuts and stitches are required.

A few weeks after the Air Force One incident, while addressing a crowd at the annual meeting of the Conservative Political Action Conference, Trump caught himself on a giant monitor. Immediately, he checked his hair. What secrets were these camera angles exposing? Then—as far as I can tell, for the first time ever—he admitted to hair loss. “Oh, I try like hell to hide that bald spot, folks,” he said. “I work hard at it. Hey, we are hanging in, we are hanging in, we are hanging in there. Right? Together, we are hanging in.”
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