A popular skin care drug—which is intended to target eczema—was just found to have an unusual side effect: hair growth. According to an article on Newsweek, the FDA-approved drug dupilumab was given to a 13-year-old alopecia sufferer to treat her eczema. The patient, who hadn’t grown hair on her scalp since she was two, suddenly grew a significant amount of hair on her head after continual use of the drug, a study in the journal JAMA Dermatology reports.

Other options include microneedling ($1,200 and up per treatment) and platelet-replacement therapy (also $1,200 and up per treatment), which are usually offered in conjunction. Your scalp will be numbed first so you don’t feel the pinpricks involved in microneedling. They promote hair regeneration by spurring wound healing, and platelet-replacement therapy involves injecting growth factors into those wounds. “Combination therapy typically works better than monotherapy and usually yields results after three monthly treatments,” says Sadick, and should be teamed with an at-home minoxidil treatment.
Quietly, however, progress churns. Joseph is the pseudonymous proprietor of the Web site Follicle Thought, a popular destination for hair-loss obsessives. Follicle Thought is dedicated to “what’s next,” Joseph told me. “What could be coming? Obviously we have other things to cure. But, like, what is the world doing about hair? Hundreds of millions of people really want it. It’s a really deep, emotional, psychological issue for people.” He paused. “I’ve put so much thought into that question.”
According to practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine, hair health is tied to two things: kidney energy and the blood, which nourish the hair. The solution: acupuncture and Chinese herbs. While there isn't a lot of hard science to back this up, Maureen Conant, a TCM practitioner at Full Bloom Acupuncture in Seattle, says that she's seen women's hair stop falling out and then gradually regenerate after a few months of weekly treatments.
Hair loss is something that affects a huge proportion of men, and yet unfortunately there is no cure. Though you may have heard of certain medicines such as Propecia (finasteride) or Regaine (minoxidil), it is far more accurate to think of these medicines as effective long-term treatments. There are interesting experimental options being trialled currently, yet these established treatments can be effective at preventing hair loss in up to 90% of men.
Natural hair that is subjected to constant physical trauma from excessive brushing or combing, tight braids or ponytails, or extreme scratching or massage can cause hair at the temples to become weak and to stop growing to its normal length. Clean shaving, especially for men, can cause white bumps to appear on the area where the hair was shaved short, and at times can become infected with pus and leave permanent scarring, affecting hair growth.
"Others are taking hair follicles out of human scalp and growing them with dermal papilla cells," Cotsarelis says. "If they grow in culture, you might be able to recombine them with skin cells and form new follicles. This would let you expand the number of follicles you get for a hair transplant. This may not be that far off -- five to 10 years, maybe. There's very good evidence you will be able to do that."
Chemotherapy is also one of the primary causes of balding among cancer patients, men and women alike. While not all chemotherapy treatments result in hair loss, some that involves the use of drugs like Altretamine, Carboplatin, Docetaxel, and Idarubicin can cause hair thinning and hair fall. In such cases, the hair loss varies from person to person and the dosage of drugs administered. Hair fall doesn't occur at once, but rather after several weeks of treatment until hair fall rate increases after one or two months of exposure to chemotherapy. Radiation therapy as part of cancer treatment can also result into hair loss but typically only in areas where the radiation is targeted.
About one-third of women experience hair loss (alopecia) at some time in their lives; among postmenopausal women, as many as two-thirds suffer hair thinning or bald spots. Hair loss in women often has a greater impact than hair loss does on men w, because it's less socially acceptable for them. Alopecia can severely affect a woman's emotional well-being and quality of life.
Minoxidil is a similar treatment to finasteride and is also available in the UK as a generic or as the well known brand-name “Regaine”. Minoxidil can be bought over the counter, unlike Propecia or finasteride, and comes in the form of a lotion, foam or cream that is rubbed into the scalp every day. Minoxidil is less effective than finasteride (only 60% of men who used Regaine Extra Strength reported regrowth after 48 weeks) but is still a viable option for men seeking treatment. It is also suitable for use by women, and can be used to treat alopecia areata. However, as with finasteride, any beneficial effects will cease once treatment has stopped.
Lately I’ve been receiving a few inquiries from readers about Shiseido and Brotzu release dates. So, I’m going to address the situation here and hope that this will be sufficient until more news comes from direct sources. I estimate that these companies would publicly address the release date of their products by the end of Q3 this year (end of Sept). As consumers we know there’s no guarantees for releases and if one or both of these products reached the market this year it would be a very fortunate situation. So, keep an eye out, but loosen the grip a little. The news will come when it comes. When there is news it will be visible here.
"The majority of men lose their hair not through stress, or bad diet, or lack of sleep, but through the genetic trait of male pattern baldness which is hard to treat through shampoos or supplements alone. Women lose their hair for very different reasons, but the argument still stands that a lot of the hair loss products on the market are just offering false hope. That said, there are a few that really work."

A few years ago, Dr. David Weinstein started to lose his hair. “I really was pissed off,” he explained to me recently, in the tidy, tiny conference room of a co-working space in Manhattan. “I’m the only male in my family who managed to keep my hair! And I was in my mid-fifties, and all of a sudden it fell out. I thought, This is nuts. I don’t like this. And then I thought, I know a little bit about regenerative medicine.” Weinstein is a neuroscientist specializing in spinal-cord injuries and nerve regeneration. Working in his lab, in his spare time, he developed a drug compound he called RT1640.


Follica is developing a wounding device that when coupled with a hair stimulant like minoxidil, is found to be more effective at triggering new growth. They like to call this wounding process ‘skin disruption’. The idea behind this treatment is that after the skin is wounded, cells migrate to that area to repair. They then must choose between two paths: healing the skin (making epidermis) or making hair. It is there where Follica sees the window of opportunity, where they can encourage the cells to do the latter and regenerate new and more hair.
It’s also possible that some of Harklinikken’s users are women whose hair would have grown back even if they’d done nothing. Many women who arrive in a dermatologist’s office with prior diagnoses of female pattern hair loss actually have what’s called telogen effluvium. That’s a period of acute shedding of hair — meaning up to 60 percent of hair — three months after a triggering event like pregnancy, significant weight loss or starting or stopping hormone medications.

Kerastem, a company developing an autologous fat-derived stem cell therapy for hair growth, has reported positive data from their phase 2 trial. The results have come from a 6 month clinical trial involving 70 patients. In this study, the patients received a one-time injection of fat-derived stem cells, and purified fat, into their scalp. Kerastem reports an average increase of 29 hairs per cm2 from the treatment, or an increase of 17% from baseline. The press release does mention that the treatment “successfully stimulates hair growth in people with early stage hair loss”, so that is something to take into consideration when evaluating the results. For more info visit Kerastem’s website. 


Follicle Thought is interested in connecting with scientists and startups who are working on hair growth or hair loss prevention research. If you or a colleague is working on hair growth please get in touch on the Contact page, even if you are not ready to share news on the site yet. Follicle Thought can offer networking and other resources to benefit your development. Thanks
Indian gooseberry. Also known as amla, Indian gooseberry is one of the most popular natural ingredients that can induce fast hair growth. It is also a known antibacterial that can help maintain a healthy scalp. Mix a tablespoon of Indian gooseberry pulp and lemon juice. Use it to massage your scalp, and cover with a shower cap after. Leave on for the night and wash with shampoo in the morning.

Hey there, I'm Shawn, the founder of Tools of Men! This site was created to help out other guys by teaching them proper grooming habits and the basics of sensible style. We try to make things here a bit of fun while giving you clear info. If you want to get in touch with us, drop us a line on the contact page or via social media. Thanks for checking out the site - and make sure to come back again!
While techniques have advanced, the bald are no better served, says Spencer Kobren, who runs Bald Truth, a website and podcast in the lustrous world of the alt-bald media. He has learned to be highly suspicious of anything announcing itself as a cure; indeed, he resolutely fails to get excited about RT1640 or the Manchester findings. “I have been doing this for 20 years,” he tells me from his home in Beverly Hills. “When I wrote my book in 1998, they had just found the hair loss gene. There was talk of hair clones. There was a cell-based solution coming out of Japan. It was like: ‘This is it! We’re going to cure this in five years!’” He’ll believe it when he sees it.

Finasteride comes in the form of a tablet and works by inhibiting the formation of DHT, a hormone which permanently damages hair follicles. They are only appropriate for use as a male pattern baldness treatment and must be taken once a day for 3-6 months for the effects to be seen. In one study, 90% of men with mild to moderate hair loss saw positive effects after taking finasteride for six months, with hair loss stopping and in some cases even reversing. Finasteride is therefore very effective while it is being taken, but will not continue to have an effect after treatment has ceased. Around a year after you have finished taking Propecia or finasteride, you can expect your hair loss to have resumed and any hair regrowth to have fallen out. For this reason, they are not cures so much as effective ongoing treatments.


Many pharmaceutical companies and researchers are in the search for a hair loss cure. This is because 7 out of 10 men and 4 out of 10 women suffer from androgenic alopecia (genetically caused hair loss) in their lifetime. In the United States that amounts to around 80 million men and 40 million women currently suffering from hair loss. Of course, a permanent cure would relieve a huge percentage of the population. 

© 2018 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 5/25/18) and Your California Privacy Rights. Allure may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices
A clinical researcher who has spent decades researching the fields of pattern hair loss, alopecia areata, endocrinology of the hair follicle and hair follicle morphogenesis, Hoffmann works in his private practice, as a teaching professor in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Marburg and as a researcher on histopathology on hair diseases. He has participated in dozens of clinical hair studies and is the inventor of TrichoScan®, a computerized technique to measure hair growth.
I noticed significant thinning, and hair all over the sink every morning, from breakage; I use a flat iron sometimes, and my hair is color-treated. I have since started using coconut oil to help manage my frizzy damaged naturally curly hair. It acts as a wonderful styling product, it lends shine and manageability, has also stopped the breakage, you just have to be very careful with the amount that you use. I also use castor oil and rosemary essential oil on my scalp at night and wash in the morning….egg is supposed to be useful for its proteins (must rinse after 20 min with cool water!!) And mayonnaise too, but I haven’t tried that. Best of luck, Friend….
NTU Working To Prevent Chemo-Induced Loss – Researchers from the National Taiwan University have developed a model for preventing chemotherapy induced hair loss, according to their publication in Cancer Research journal. The team, lead by professor Lin Sung-jan, identified a specific type of cell that hair follicles utilize to compensate for the toxicity which occurs during exposure to ionizing radiation (chemotherapy). These cells are called transit-amplifying cells (TAC). Preclinical animal testing with applied TAC-derived progenitor cells showed a 70-80% reduction in hair loss after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Importantly, Sung-jan has recently stated he is in talks with companies about conducting trials on humans. It’s interesting to note that Lin Sung-jan has done an extensive amount of research on hair regeneration in the past. Hopefully this treatment could potentially be used for more common types of hair loss as well.

Would there be any harm/benefit in combining the use of two hair-loss prevention shampoos, to take advantage of different ingredients and functions? Mainly Nizoral, at the twice a week recommendation, plus the Argan Oil Shampoo twice a week? I have somewhat oily hair and do get dandruff from time to time, but I do feel after washing my hair, it can feel dry and stiff. Just wondering if a combination of the two (one for dandruff, and one for healthy, thicker hair) might prove effective. Also, would you have any recommendations on a combo? Thanks!


Reviews.com has an advertising relationship with some of the offers included on this page. However, the rankings and listings of our reviews, tools and all other content are based on objective analysis. For more information, please check out our full Advertiser Disclosure. Reviews.com strives to keep its information accurate and up to date. The information in our reviews could be different from what you find when visiting a financial institution, service provider or a specific product’s website. All products are presented without warranty.
In the following decades, researchers learned that testosterone does not work alone. An enzyme converts testosterone into a substance called dihydrotestosterone, or DHT, which causes hair follicles to shrink. DHT attacks the dermal papilla, the “brain” of the hair follicle, and is the main cause of male-pattern baldness, which affects more than fifty million men in the United States and also—largely unremarked upon, but true—more than thirty million women.
Hair transplant surgery – which works by painstakingly moving grafts of hair (typically two to four follicles at a time) from the back of the head to the temples and crown, the first parts to drop – is becoming mainstream. Wayne Rooney was frank about his 48-hour, £30,000 follicular unit extraction at Harley Street Hair Clinic in 2011, and is widely credited with changing attitudes towards the procedure. Actor James Nesbitt had one as he feared he’d lose out on roles as a bald man. “It was something I struggled with,” he said, “and that was probably the vanity in me.”
Category: Alopecia Areata, Alopecia Pipeline, Hair Care Products, Hair Growth Pipeline Tags: Alopecia News, Autoimmune Disease Hair Growth, Carboxytherapy For Alopecia, Cures For Hair Loss, Cures For Hair Loss Coming Soon, Cynata Therapeutics, Deion Sanders Hair, Deion Sanders Hair Transplant Results, Gray Hair Cure, Grey Hair Cure, Hair Growth Cosmetic, Hair Loss Cure, Hair Loss News, Hair Stem Cell Cosmetic, JW Pharma Wnt Hair Growth, Organ Technologies Hair Cloning, PTD-DBM Hair Growth, Sandalore, Switch Biotech Hair Growth, WAY-316606 Hair Growth, Yonsei University Hair Research
It is called the vampire treatment because blood is taken from the patient that removes the platelet rich plasma. Then, the PRP is injected back into the scalp. This energizes the scalp with new active blood flow. Treatment is available at select clinics but widespread adoption may become the norm. It is less invasive than hair transplants but costs more if you count the cost of doing many sessions.
Please help. My hair has always been my pride and joy. I figured since it is pretty damn healthy, it could deal with some bleach damage. And I figured the master stylist who did all the color-corrections would know how much would be too much. I was wrong, and now I want to burst into tears every time I look at my hair or touch it. I just don’t know what to do. my hair has also NEVER been shorter than this and it breaks and falls out. What should i do to regrow hair?
This is a short-term cure, applied while waiting for hair to grow, and therefore recommended for those with a mild to medium case of hair loss. In addition to being non-invasive, hair concealers and hair fibers are instant and affordable. Like wigs and hairpieces, they are used to effectively cover up balding spots while not getting in the way of growing hair. Compared to wigs, however, they are more natural looking and blend well with your natural hair, therefore drawing less attention when you're out in public.
Our panel of five people was unanimous in their choice – Shapiro MD. Developed by two leading dermatologists this patented formula has been proven to fight and even reverses hair loss in both men and women.  While some testers found the smell a bit herbal the overall consensus was that it was a fantastic color-safe shampoo and a moisturizing conditioner. In addition, we found their customer service was excellent and they honored their 60-day guarantee.  Shapiro MD designed their shampoo and conditioner with pharmaceutical-grade ingredients.  Shapiro MD’s mission is to develop health and beauty products using only clinically tested ingredients.
Thanks so much for the guidance! After further research I have to agree with you 100%. Lipogaine Big 3 does containe ketoconazole, which would eliminate the need for Nizoral, however the shampoo only contains a few hair loss/thinning related ingredients. The Big 5 contains 17 and just seems like a better overall product. That plus Nizoral twice weekly seems pretty solid to me.
Literally jumping right out of the woodwork, the company “HCell” has announced they have been granted an orphan designation from the US FDA for their novel treatment of pediatric alopecia areata. The treatment itself it described as a “topical Injection by regenerating hair through a proprietary blend of commercially procured biologic and autologous tissue.” The company also mentions having a treatment for androgenic alopecia in the works as well. More info to come soon. News release here. 
Pura d’or also have a hair loss conditioner compliment to this shampoo but we think it’s a bit overkill to use both(as a bottle of this stuff runs on the pricey side)—but if you love the shampoo the conditioner is also a very popular product that couldn’t hurt. Leave it in for about 3 minutes and let your scalp absorb all those vitamins and minerals.
Women’s magazine ‘New Beauty’ recently featured several prospective hair growth therapies in a print article. The feature contains several interesting and worthwhile anecdotes. Check the Articles main page to read about Dr. Cotsarelis’ new research on setipiprant for female alopecia, Histogen’s view on the number of injection sessions which may be necessary to get the most out of HSC, and more.
It is called the vampire treatment because blood is taken from the patient that removes the platelet rich plasma. Then, the PRP is injected back into the scalp. This energizes the scalp with new active blood flow. Treatment is available at select clinics but widespread adoption may become the norm. It is less invasive than hair transplants but costs more if you count the cost of doing many sessions.
×