Update: I have been in contact with the administrator of the new Trinov site. It’s apparently a European based site, it is not officially affiliated with Fidia Pharma. The admin plans to use the site to focus on Trinov reviews and vet the product. All in all, it seems benevolent. For the record, we have known for a while that TrinovCapelli.com is a domain which is owned by Fidia Pharma and expected to be the official Trinov website. As of now that domain is not active yet.
1. Minoxidil. It’s the only FDA-approved topical nonprescription medication that can claim to regrow hair — and it should be part of any hair-loss plan if you have serious thinning, says Rogers. Minoxidil has loads of research to back it, but it requires commitment. If you quit using it, your hair will start to lose ground again. Use a 5 percent strength, like Women’s Rogaine 5% Minoxidil Foam ($30), once daily to see results in three to four months, says Rogers.
Follica is developing a wounding device that when coupled with a hair stimulant like minoxidil, is found to be more effective at triggering new growth. They like to call this wounding process ‘skin disruption’. The idea behind this treatment is that after the skin is wounded, cells migrate to that area to repair. They then must choose between two paths: healing the skin (making epidermis) or making hair. It is there where Follica sees the window of opportunity, where they can encourage the cells to do the latter and regenerate new and more hair.
7/26/18 Update: After positive early data, various trials of JAK inhibitors such as Ruxolitinib and Xeljanz are underway. Columbia researchers have had positive results with Xeljanz in 11 out of 12 subjects achieving some regrowth with no adverse side effects over 16 months of treatment. Investigators at Stanford and Yale are conducting three trials of oral and topical tofacitnib and Locks of Love Foundation is fuding another ruxolitinib study. At this time, there are about 15 publications looking at JAK inhibitors and their relationship to alopecia and its variants.
One of the downsides to the product is that you pay hand over foot for all those special ingredients DS packed into this bottle. It’s not the cheap crap that most manufacturers throw into your standard shampoos. It is expensive stuff, and using it daily means there’s no real way of making it last a long time either. The bottom line is you have to bite the bullet but with all the ingredients in this bottle, you’re getting your money’s worth.
The truth is, the amount of propylene glycol in hair loss treatments is not likely to cause any real harm and the FDA has given the chemical approval for many uses. But even though it is safe, we wanted to ensure that our top picks would be as comfortable to use as possible. So when Dr. Khadavi told us that “a third of my patients get irritated from minoxidil products because of propylene glycol,” we decided to cut any treatments with it. In any case, it’s the minoxidil that helps curb hair loss and not the propylene glycol.
If you’re a gentleman who’s been noticing a receding hairline or is worried about balding, the first step is to schedule a visit with a doctor or dermatologist and make sure your hair loss isn’t a sign of a more serious health issue. “Not all hair loss is male-pattern hair loss,” explains Dr. Marc Glashofer, a board-certified dermatologist specializing in hair loss and practicing in northern New Jersey. A thyroid disorder, an autoimmune disease, or even a scalp issue could be making you look like Bruce Willis in Die Hard 2. But most hair loss is androgenetic alopecia, also known as male-pattern baldness, and fortunately (or not, depending on your perspective), it’s just a symptom of getting older.
It never hurts to do a little bit of research when exploring treatment options for hair loss. But at some point, you'll probably want to talk with a physician so that you can get a professional opinion about how to combat hair loss. We don't recommend cutting corners by exploring cheaper homeopathic and all-natural remedies as an alternative. Drugs like finasteride and minoxidil are clinically proven to treat male pattern baldness and even reverse hair loss with a majority of men, and they’re approved by the FDA.
How to use minoxidil: Be sure that your hair and scalp are dry. Using the dropper or spray pump that's provided with the over-the-counter solution, apply it twice daily to every area where your hair is thinning. Gently massage it into the scalp with your fingers so it can reach the hair follicles. Then air-dry your hair, wash your hands thoroughly, and wash off any solution that has dripped onto your forehead or face. Don't shampoo for at least four hours afterwards.
The follicles on the sides of the scalp are more genetically resistant to DHT, which is why male pattern baldness often results in a “crown” of hair. But its downsides are serious. “With women, finasteride is not an option,” says Dr. Wolfeld. “It’s not FDA-approved for women to take, so we don’t prescribe it.” In fact, due to the drug’s effect on hormone levels, pregnant women are advised to not even touch broken or crushed tablets.
Hair is made up of the hair follicle (a pocket in the skin that anchors each hair) and the shaft (the visible fiber above the scalp). In the hair bulb, located at the base of the follicle, cells divide and grow to produce the hair shaft, which is made from a protein called keratin. Papilla that surround the bulb contain tiny blood vessels that nourish the hair follicles and deliver hormones to regulate the growth and structure of the hair.
Due to the concern of several readers, I’ve removed the link to the new Trinov website that has popped up on the net. For now, the website only contains an email address subscription box which really poses no issue to anyone who subscribed. At this time, it’s not confirmed who the actual owner of the new Trinov site is, so use your discretion until we find out more regarding this matter. Until more information is known the website will not be shared on Follicle Thought.
Thank you so much for responding, Domen! Another question after further research this weekend. – have you heard of/used/reviewed a product called Regenepure,? The shampoo contains 1% ketoconazole and is the same price as Lipogaine, Used every day, that would seem to eliminate the need for adding Nizoral to the weekly regimen. Curious to hear what you know about that product. Thanks again!!!

Thanks so much for the guidance! After further research I have to agree with you 100%. Lipogaine Big 3 does containe ketoconazole, which would eliminate the need for Nizoral, however the shampoo only contains a few hair loss/thinning related ingredients. The Big 5 contains 17 and just seems like a better overall product. That plus Nizoral twice weekly seems pretty solid to me.
There are many different types and forms of hair concealers. The two most popular types are hair sprays, and sprinkles and powder solids. Sprays are easy to apply compared to creams and powders. They contain chemicals and dye that can match the shade of your hair, making it fuller. However, it has a tendency to look less natural if applied haphazardly so it requires some care during application.
The best fix by far for replacing lost hair is a transplant. Back in the day, docs used plugs that resembled cornrows (definitely not natural looking). Today, guys have more options. You can go for “the strip method” where a doctor surgically removes a strip of hair from the back of your head, dissects every hair graft under a microscope, and then plants the individual grafts onto hair-thin areas of your scalp with tiny incisions.
Studies have indicated that one of the ways to slow hair loss is by maintaining a healthy scalp environment. Regular shampooing aids in the prevention of genetic hair loss by removing excess sebum containing elevated levels of DHT. Unfortunately, there is no silver bullet hair loss shampoo on the market that will regrow a full head of hair in a couple weeks.
Our panel of five people was unanimous in their choice – Shapiro MD. Developed by two leading dermatologists this patented formula has been proven to fight and even reverses hair loss in both men and women.  While some testers found the smell a bit herbal the overall consensus was that it was a fantastic color-safe shampoo and a moisturizing conditioner. In addition, we found their customer service was excellent and they honored their 60-day guarantee.  Shapiro MD designed their shampoo and conditioner with pharmaceutical-grade ingredients.  Shapiro MD’s mission is to develop health and beauty products using only clinically tested ingredients.
While you are waiting for the Big breakthrough, You may want to give Rosemary and Lavender essential oil a shot. I have found that my scalp feels much healthier after using this treatment once a week. I’m in hopes it is stimulating new hair growth as well. Check out some recipes online and reply with your thoughts or other techniques you find helpful. Let’s help each other fight the good fight against hair loss!
And, for all of these collective efforts, Christiano reminded me, the only things that have really worked were discovered accidentally. Soon to join minoxidil and finasteride will be Xeljanz, or tofacitinib: originally developed for rheumatoid arthritis, it has remarkable effects on hair growth for patients with alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder that causes patients to lose hair in big patches over their entire bodies.
Another type of hair loss is alopecia areata, in which hair on the head (and sometimes on the body) falls out in patches. In most cases this type of hair loss resolves itself within a few months, however in some cases it can lead to more severe forms of hair loss such as alopecia totalis (loss of all hair on the scalp) or alopecia universalis (loss of all hair on the body). Alopecia areata is most common in people aged 15-29 and there are various treatments for it: minoxidil, corticosteroid injections, topical corticosteroid creams or lotions, dithranol cream, immunotherapy and light therapy. However none of these can be thought of as a cure for alopecia areata, as they are only temporary solutions.
While there can be numerous reasons behind the thinning of your hair, including certain hairstyles, excessive chemical processes, hereditary factors, and nutritional deficiencies, the most common is aging. But why does hair become thin as we age? Well, as we get older so do our hair follicles. With age, the size of hair follicles begins to shrink, meaning the rate of hair growth begins to slow down and, in some cases, ceases completely. Another reason for thinning hair lies in the production (or lack thereof) of estrogen as we age. Aside from regulating the reproductive system, estrogen plays a big part in hair growth. So, when we begin to produce less estrogen, there's less available to stimulate new hair growth (especially after old hair has shed), ultimately resulting in thin hair.
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