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Try balayam yoga. Balayam yoga (also called balam yoga) is an ancient acupressure exercise associated with hair growth. It comes from the Hindu words, Bal, which means hair, and Vyayam meaning exercise. The exercise involves rubbing the fingernails on both hands together to stimulate activity in the scalp. It has been known to help cure pattern baldness in men and women if done correctly and frequently over a long period of time.
Kuntzman described the “snake oil” era of hair restoration, in the early twentieth century, when salesmen offered nonsense treatments, often with horrific results. One involved “cylinders of skin taken from the abdomen and sewn into your scalp to function as a sort of belt loop” for new hairs, Kuntzman said; another used paraffin injections that left some customers with lifelong horn-like head bumps. Most of the really ugly stuff ended in 1938, when the Food and Drug Administration began regulating the industry.
The third and fourth stages are known as telogen and exogen, respectively. In telogen, the hair is supposed to be at "rest" until it finally detaches itself from the follicle and enters the exogen or shedding stage. Once the hair is detached from the follicle, the follicle remains inactive for about three months, after which a new cycle begins again.

The Rogaine rep we spoke to explained that the different packaging (and therefore different prices) has to do with the FDA-approval process: “We discovered in clinical trials that the hair loss patterns between men and women are different,” she said by way of explanation. “Men typically have that bald spot on the crown of their head, where women generally have a general thinning throughout, but concentrated more on the top of the head. So for FDA approval, we had to come up with two different, gender-specific products, so the directions were more explanatory.”

Tinea capitis requires systemic treatment; topical antifungal agents do not penetrate hair follicles. If the causative agent is a Trichophyton species, treatment options include oral terbinafine (Lamisil), itraconazole (Sporanox), fluconazole (Diflucan), and griseofulvin.15 These agents have similar efficacy rates and potential adverse effects, but griseofulvin requires a longer treatment course. Griseofulvin is the preferred treatment for infections caused by Microsporum species, but definitive studies are lacking.15,16 There are limited data about empiric treatment before culture results are available. Because griseofulvin may have lower cure rates in the treatment of T. tonsurans infections, it may not be as effective when used empirically.15 All close contacts of patients with tinea capitis should be examined for signs of infection and treated, if necessary.
Key features: The Thick & full Hair Growth Set by DermaChange is a go-to option for hair loss and thinning strands — it's chock-full of vitamins and oils that promote hair regrowth and prevent hair loss by hydrating, strengthening, and thickening strands with natural ingredients. It's also made with a gentle, sulfate-free formula, so it's a safe choice for color-treated hair and sensitive scalps.

Examination of the scalp in patients with telogen effluvium typically shows uniform hair thinning. The presence of erythema, scaling, or inflammation; altered or uneven hair distribution; or changes in shaft caliber, length, shape, or fragility may suggest other diagnoses. Laboratory investigations are indicated if the history and physical examination findings suggest underlying systemic disorders (e.g., iron deficiency anemia, zinc deficiency, renal or liver disease, thyroid disease).
The Holy Grail remains a drug that will promote regrowth, but this might not be so far away. Earlier this year, Manchester University announced that an osteoporosis drug had been found to have “dramatic results” promoting hair growth when applied to tissue samples in pre-clinical trials. The resultant frenzy left the PhD student responsible, Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, a little dazed. “Every other week, something comes out about hair loss and it doesn’t generate as much media coverage as what I experienced,” he grumbles. He’s in this for the science – there aren’t many fields where you get to mess around with real human tissue – but such is the distress caused by hair loss and such is the potential customer base that interest is always high.
1. Collagen powder. Preliminary studies suggest that marine-sourced collagen may stimulate hair growth, says New York City dermatologist Yoon-Soo Cindy Bae. Though more research is needed, participants in studies reported thicker hair after three to six months of daily use. Crushed Tonic Original Powder ($105) easily mixes into coffee, tea, and water.
"Others are taking hair follicles out of human scalp and growing them with dermal papilla cells," Cotsarelis says. "If they grow in culture, you might be able to recombine them with skin cells and form new follicles. This would let you expand the number of follicles you get for a hair transplant. This may not be that far off -- five to 10 years, maybe. There's very good evidence you will be able to do that."

In-office laser light treatments or at-home handheld devices, such as the HairMax LaserComb, supposedly grow new hair by stimulating blood flow to the area (think: an amped-up version of a scalp-stimulating shampoo). Just don’t expect the device to make your noggin go from looking like George Costanza’s to Jerry Seinfeld’s. “These lasers won’t grow any new hair. If anything, they may just help you hang on to some of the hair that you already have a bit longer,” says Dr. Joyce.
Hollywood has made movies about it. Industries have made billions from it. And if the volume of scripture is any indication, the Almighty God must have placed great value on his creation of the head of human hair. After all, He gave Samson—the strongest man of whom the Bible tells—his immense strength through his hair and declared a woman’s hair "a glory unto" her in the 11th chapter of 1 Chorinthians.

In 2013, RepliCel began working with the Tokyo-based Shiseido Company, Limited—a Japanese multinational skin care, hair care, cosmetics and fragrance producer—on a collaboration giving Shiseido an exclusive geographic license to use RepliCel’s RCH-01 hair regeneration technology in Japan, China, South Korea, Taiwan and the ASEAN countries representing a population of approximately 2.1 billion people. “Shiseido and RepliCel will collaborate on the continued improvement of the technology and will conduct human clinical trials in each of their territories with the goal of commercializing a safe and effective hair regenerative treatment to help those suffering from pattern baldness and thinning hair,” Buckler said.
Many pharmaceutical companies and researchers are in the search for a hair loss cure. This is because 7 out of 10 men and 4 out of 10 women suffer from androgenic alopecia (genetically caused hair loss) in their lifetime. In the United States that amounts to around 80 million men and 40 million women currently suffering from hair loss. Of course, a permanent cure would relieve a huge percentage of the population.
Minoxidil (Rogaine). Minoxidil is one of the most common and popular forms of medication for hair loss, particularly pattern baldness, but also generally used in cases of alopecia areata. It is an over-the-counter drug that comes in either liquid or foam form and is applied on the scalp, particularly on the bald patches, to promote hair growth and stop further hair loss.
When you notice one or more of these problems, you might be experiencing hair loss. For more information on the different stages of balding, have a look at the Norwood Scale. There, you can see the seven different stages of male pattern baldness. As hair loss progresses higher on the scale it becomes more difficult to keep your hair and potentially regrow lost hair. 

Our runner-up Clinical Effects Hair Therapy was a very close second to our top pick and our Best Value choice. Several of our testers felt that this was the overall best shampoo both in how their hair felt as well as the light scent.  We feel that it is the best overall value in this category as you can buy it at a price significantly less than the competition.  Clinical Effects is for both men and women and comes with an amazing 90 Day guarantee that is also the best in this category. We highly recommend it if you’re looking for a less expensive option to Shapiro MD.  They have fantastic customer service and stand behind all of their products.
After the new article featuring Medipost’s hair growth cosmetic was published, Jay Lee PhD of Medipost, began chiming in on the comments section. He first shared that Medipost is currently engaging in a larger clinical trial for the CM3 product which would include higher scale Norwood’s. Then, in a following comment he revealed that Medipost is developing a potentially more advanced hair growth product as well. Here are his words:
Aside from medication and lasers, some opt for hair transplants — a procedure where hairs are removed from another part of your body and then transplanted to the thinning or balding areas. Does it work? In a word, yes. Research suggests that most hair transplant recipients report are "very satisfied" with their results. While successful, transplants are also far more expensive than medications, foams, or lasers with costs averaging anywhere from $4,000 or $15,000.
Two clinical trials have been ran as a proof of concept for Histogen. Terminal hair count and hair thickness noticeably increased after just 12 weeks. Due to this success, Histogen plans to conduct a Phase 1 Clinical Study in the United States. This will be an injectable which when injected into the scalp will stimulate dormant hair follicles and induce new hair follicle formation (think Botox but for hair follicles instead of skin cells). HSC660 is an ongoing female hair loss trial that will run for 22 weeks and a late stage (Phase 3 trial) for men has initiated in Mexico. Histogen founder Gail Naughton even went so far to reveal commercialization, “We’e in very late-stage negotiations with some huge retail partners,” she says. It may not be a magic bullet, but it would sure be nice to have an alternative/supplement to Rogaine that actually stimulates growth.
When it comes to organic products there are popular and high-quality brands you can choose from. Some chemicals can have quite harsh effects on longer hair, which means that they are not always suitable for women.  There are several organic brands that can be effective for those sensitive to these chemicals and in some cases can be more effective. Among the organic shampoos available are Reborn MAX and PhytoWorx.  Two brands that use caffeine are Apex Crown from Wick & Strom, and Ultrax Labs Hair Surge.
One of the longest running companies in the hair growth industry, Histogen, has been granted an IND from the US FDA for the use of its growth factor biologic (HSC) in female androgenic alopecia. The product will be called “HSC660” for use in women. IND stands for ‘investigational new drug’, and is a necessary permit that companies must obtain before starting clinical trials with a new medicinal substance. 
Follica is developing a wounding device that when coupled with a hair stimulant like minoxidil, is found to be more effective at triggering new growth. They like to call this wounding process ‘skin disruption’. The idea behind this treatment is that after the skin is wounded, cells migrate to that area to repair. They then must choose between two paths: healing the skin (making epidermis) or making hair. It is there where Follica sees the window of opportunity, where they can encourage the cells to do the latter and regenerate new and more hair.
2. A strategic cut. Long, layer-free haircuts divert volume from the roots, making your part seem wider than it is, Scrivo says. Going shorter (than your current length — no need for a major chop) helps take weight off so hair can look fuller and bouncier. And layers that angle inward on the sides will build height and body at the crown. If you’re game to try bangs, Scrivo says, they lessen the amount of scalp that shows at the hairline.
Nioxin is one of the well-known brand names in the field of natural hair loss treatments, and the company has a dizzying array of products intended for use with different types of hair, including fine, normal, treated and noticeably thinning. They also sell their shampoo, scalp revitalizing conditioner and scalp treatments packaged together, for what they say are better results – and at a higher price.

There’s no cure for baldness, but there are ways to hold on to what you've got. The six dermatologists and the clinical studies point to three methods: minoxidil, laser treatments, and prescription finasteride. The key is finding the combination and hair loss regimen that works for you. A doctor is your best bet for that kind of guidance — but we found a few trustworthy products that will work for most people.
"This is an oral, prescription-only medication with the brand name Propecia that’s also FDA approved to treat hair loss," says Spencer. Male pattern hair loss occurs when a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT) prevents hair follicles from getting the nutrients they need. Finasteride works by blocking the production of DHT, which protects the follicles.
One of the longest running companies in the hair growth industry, Histogen, has been granted an IND from the US FDA for the use of its growth factor biologic (HSC) in female androgenic alopecia. The product will be called “HSC660” for use in women. IND stands for ‘investigational new drug’, and is a necessary permit that companies must obtain before starting clinical trials with a new medicinal substance. 
Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is another vitamin that you can find in a lot of men’s hair loss shampoos. Like biotin, niacin and its derivatives are scientifically proven to increase hair growth when topically applied to hair growth areas over the course of several months. However, it's important to call out that this pilot study used female participants.
HCell Inc. announced this week in a press release the addition of two new members to its Board of Directors. Robert P. Ryan PhD and Marlene Haffner MD PhD comprise the additions to the Board. HCell mentions in the release that the respective additions will be supportive to HCell through their combined experience in orphan drug development and FDA regulatory processes.
For those of you who only check the Updates page, there was a new Brotzu Check-In article published yesterday. Giovanni Brotzu will be presenting data pertaining to his lotion’s use in androgenetic alopecia at an Italian hair research Congress this Saturday, April 14th. We hope to see photo results from the presentation. Check back to the Brotzu article next week for updates.
Follicum’s origins trace back to 2004, when two Lund University researchers targeting arteriosclerosis stumbled across a modified protein called osteopontin, which grew hair in mice. The researchers knew nothing about the hair-growth industry, but were quickly informed that there were big market demands, especially in Asia. “If you lose hair in Asia, you lose a lot of your credibility,” Jan Alenfall, the C.E.O. of Follicum, said. “This was really a serendipity finding.”
Minoxidil (Rogaine). Minoxidil is one of the most common and popular forms of medication for hair loss, particularly pattern baldness, but also generally used in cases of alopecia areata. It is an over-the-counter drug that comes in either liquid or foam form and is applied on the scalp, particularly on the bald patches, to promote hair growth and stop further hair loss.
Hair loss shampoos are an excellent addition to any hair loss prevention regime. They are also a cost-effective and convenient way to start treating hair loss. Sure, not many of these have long term clinical studies completed on their efficacy. However, some of these shampoos are chock full of botanicals and herbs that do have some clinical data backing them up.
"The majority of men lose their hair not through stress, or bad diet, or lack of sleep, but through the genetic trait of male pattern baldness which is hard to treat through shampoos or supplements alone. Women lose their hair for very different reasons, but the argument still stands that a lot of the hair loss products on the market are just offering false hope. That said, there are a few that really work."
Yet another company has made news this week for phase 2 trial progress. Concert Pharmaceuticals announced today that they have completed enrollment for their phase 2a trial using CTP-543 in alopecia areata. CTP-543 is an oral JAK inhibitor which acts on JAK 1 and 2, it’s also known as ruxolitinib. Concert’s version of ruxolitinib has been modified by the company’s proprietary deuterium chemistry technology which the company hopes will improve its effects on AA.
What’s equally frustrating for women is that their hair loss is not as clearly understood as hair loss in men and, according to an article in www.dermentz.org, “..presents itself quite differently from the more recognizable male pattern baldness which usually begins with a receding frontal hairline that progresses to a bald patch on top of the head.” The same article also says that it’s uncommon for women to follow a male pattern unless there is excessive production of androgens in her body.
The annual World Congress for Hair Research kicks off today in Kyoto, Japan. The Congress will go on until Friday November 3, 2017. The purpose of the event is to share presentations about different lines of research and product development regarding alopecia areata, stem cell biology, androgenic alopecia, cosmetic care, wigs, hair transplants, and more. Basically, all things hair industry. At these conferences a few companies typically will announce some news about their developments and progress. I’ll update any news I receive regarding announcements made at the Congress. WCHR2017 website.
Hair grooming, but more importantly, having a head-full of hair is as important to men as it is to women. To women, it may be an important accessory of beauty, and for men, it adds to a sense of manliness, enhances their looks and makes them more appealing and attractive to women. Balding to men is associated with aging (only old men are expected to lose hair) and therefore, having hair on one's head is a sign of virility and masculinity.
Researchers from UCLA in the lab of Jing Huang have recently shown that certain molecules which activate the cellular process known as autophagy also drive hair follicles into the anagen (growth) phase. The researchers studied different metabolite molecules and other molecules which are FDA approved and on the market as drugs. The most recognizable drugs from the study were metformin and rapamycin, one is a diabetes medicine and the other an immunosuppressant. Dr. Huang says her lab is looking to study these drugs for human hair growth soon. In my opinion, results from that study are something to look out for. Full article on the Articles page.
The Holy Grail remains a drug that will promote regrowth, but this might not be so far away. Earlier this year, Manchester University announced that an osteoporosis drug had been found to have “dramatic results” promoting hair growth when applied to tissue samples in pre-clinical trials. The resultant frenzy left the PhD student responsible, Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, a little dazed. “Every other week, something comes out about hair loss and it doesn’t generate as much media coverage as what I experienced,” he grumbles. He’s in this for the science – there aren’t many fields where you get to mess around with real human tissue – but such is the distress caused by hair loss and such is the potential customer base that interest is always high.
Scientists from the Indiana University School of Medicine have for the first time created skin with hair follicles using mice stem cells. Research was led by Professor Karl Koehler. The team was able to grow both the epidermis and dermis layers of skin to create a realistic skin model. An interesting quote from Professor Koehler: “It looks like a little ball of pocket lint that floats around in the culture medium. The skin develops as a spherical cyst and then the hair follicles grow outward in all directions – like dandelion seeds.”
McElwee is an associate professor in the Department of Dermatology and Skin Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in British Columbia, Canada and director of the Hair Research Laboratory in the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHI) at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH). A hair research scientist, McElwee is one of only a small group of research scientists worldwide who studies hair biology and associated diseases. 

Researchers from South Korea have identified a new peptide called PTD-DBM which exhibits wound healing and hair regeneration effects in preclinical studies. The research is being led by Professor Kang-Yell Choi of Yonsei University. Choi’s team identified the peptide PTD-DBM which targets a protein called CXXC5. The interaction of these two proteins leads to stimulation of the Wnt pathway, which then initiates hair follicle neogenesis. Choi hopes to develop this peptide further into a potential hair growth drug candidate. A research paper about these findings was put out by the team earlier this year. Source article about this development here.

Finasteride comes in the form of a tablet and works by inhibiting the formation of DHT, a hormone which permanently damages hair follicles. They are only appropriate for use as a male pattern baldness treatment and must be taken once a day for 3-6 months for the effects to be seen. In one study, 90% of men with mild to moderate hair loss saw positive effects after taking finasteride for six months, with hair loss stopping and in some cases even reversing. Finasteride is therefore very effective while it is being taken, but will not continue to have an effect after treatment has ceased. Around a year after you have finished taking Propecia or finasteride, you can expect your hair loss to have resumed and any hair regrowth to have fallen out. For this reason, they are not cures so much as effective ongoing treatments.
A few weeks after the Air Force One incident, while addressing a crowd at the annual meeting of the Conservative Political Action Conference, Trump caught himself on a giant monitor. Immediately, he checked his hair. What secrets were these camera angles exposing? Then—as far as I can tell, for the first time ever—he admitted to hair loss. “Oh, I try like hell to hide that bald spot, folks,” he said. “I work hard at it. Hey, we are hanging in, we are hanging in, we are hanging in there. Right? Together, we are hanging in.”
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