Alexey Terskikh PhD of Sanford Burnham Prebys research institute has news to share about his hair follicle research. The Articles page gives you all the highlights on what advancements Terskikh has made over the past three years and when he is planning to take his cloning method to FDA human trials. This is one example of a peer reviewed journal article which actually developed to human translation in a timely manner. Happy Friday
I know that Follicle Thought has been very useful and inspiring to companies, doctors, and people interested in hair restoration alike. A one-time pledge to my donation page would make a difference in my life and be very appreciated. To make a one-time donation simply click “Become a Patron” on the right sidebar of my Patreon page. Then you can adjust the amount of how much you’d like to contribute; Patreon will call this a “monthly contribution”, however you can cancel your pledge after one month, hence making it a one-time pledge. 😊 I am thankful to all of you who take a moment to visit the page and make a contribution, it means a lot, especially for the hours upon hours I have put into the site to make the best information available to you all.

McElwee is an associate professor in the Department of Dermatology and Skin Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in British Columbia, Canada and director of the Hair Research Laboratory in the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHI) at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH). A hair research scientist, McElwee is one of only a small group of research scientists worldwide who studies hair biology and associated diseases.
I started combining two of them right away – because they both had different ingredients that I really wanted. I combine the Hair Surge for the caffeine, ketoconazole, and saw palmetto, along with the Regenepure DR for the Emu oil. I use a bit of both every day – and though I haven’t noticed a lot of hair coming back in – I HAVE noticed that a whole lot less is falling out. I used to see lots of hair in the tub or in my hand after drying. Hopefully some baby hairs will start so show themselves soon.
This super-clean (and paraben- and sulfates-free, non-GMO, and vegan) shampoo zones in on the hair-saving supplement you’ve been hearing about for years: biotin. Nature’s Gate pairs its key ingredient with bamboo, a silica-packed scalp cleanser, and follicle-fortifying pro-vitamin B5. “I have thin hair that was breaking off and clogging my drain,” one reviewer wrote on Amazon. “No longer ... I may not have thick hair but it is stronger after using this shampoo.”
“I also reached out to Histogen and Follicum a few weeks ago as well thanking them for all their hard work in bringing a safe and effective treatment to people all over the globe with hairloss issues and expressed how much we all value these companies. I held back from asking about market release as you had suggested. I received a very nice reply from Histogen.”
After a severe illness, I lost more than half of my formerly beautiful long hair. Since then, I've tried many shampoos claiming to encourage regrowth of healthy hair. Well, I found it! This shampoo really works. It smells great and has resulted in my hair being stronger and shiny; it no longer breaks easily and my hair stays on my head rather than in the hairbrush! Yay! Be sure to follow the instructions for use. A little goes a long way.
Unlike The Big 3 Shampoo from Lipogaine, The Big 5 does not contain ketoconazole or copper peptides. However, it does have everything else The Big 3 has + 17 natural hair stimulating ingredients. We view this shampoo as more of a natural thickening shampoo whereas The Big 3 is going to be a little harsher on the scalp but better at nuking scalp DHT. Both shampoos are excellent products from trusted brand Lipogaine. We do know of some users that had had success rotating the Lipogaine shampoos and use The Big 3 every 3rd day or so and incorporate The Big 5 into their daily routine.
Taking hair supplements can be helpful for anyone who is experiencing hair loss or hair thinning. Dendy Engelman, MD, a board-certified dermatologic surgeon at Medical Dermatology & Cosmetic Surgery in New York City, previously recommended Nutrafol, a research-backed hair supplement, to Prevention. "This uses highly concentrated botanicals to address every stage of the growth cycle," she says. Nutrafol's hair supplements include vitamin E and ashwagandha (an adaptogen that helps balance cortisol levels in the body), among others.
Alexey Terskikh PhD of Sanford Burnham Prebys research institute has news to share about his hair follicle research. The Articles page gives you all the highlights on what advancements Terskikh has made over the past three years and when he is planning to take his cloning method to FDA human trials. This is one example of a peer reviewed journal article which actually developed to human translation in a timely manner. Happy Friday

Thanks so much for the guidance! After further research I have to agree with you 100%. Lipogaine Big 3 does containe ketoconazole, which would eliminate the need for Nizoral, however the shampoo only contains a few hair loss/thinning related ingredients. The Big 5 contains 17 and just seems like a better overall product. That plus Nizoral twice weekly seems pretty solid to me.
In just the past few years, we’ve made remarkable strides in understanding Trump’s head. In March, 2016, with Trump the presumptive G.O.P. nominee, Gawker’s Ashley Feinberg published a diligent and compelling investigation, “Is Donald Trump’s Hair a $60,000 Weave?” It pointed to a high-end clinic called Ivari International that, for a while, at least, had the kind of complicated ties to Trump and Trump Tower that we’d later see in the dignitaries of various hostile foreign governments.
As we wait and anticipate the market release of a new hair treatment there may be times when the waiting gets to us and we feel disappointed, frustrated, and even depressed. This is understandable. However, like many other times in life, a simple change of perspective can lift our mood and positively impact how we feel about a situation. When we look at these companies, are we looking at them as commodities? Are they people who owe you something? Or, are they actually rare groups of folks who are working to bring a gift to your life? How often do you really feel grateful to these companies for the work they are doing?
Last fall, the San Francisco startup Hims began a small publicity blitz. Its ads were all over in-boxes and social-media feeds and TV screens; they were even out in real life, on paper placards. Above a picture of a handsome young man with long, luscious dark hair, there was a bold claim: “Thanks to science, baldness is now optional.” Hims, which also sells shampoos and erectile-dysfunction medication, has a minimalist aesthetic, designed by Partners & Spade. (The agency has done work for famed disruptors such as Warby Parker and Casper.) It also has an in-house journal called Savoir Faire. And, within all that attractive packaging and identity branding, the company was very casually offering the holy grail. My latent obsession led me to ask some questions of the ad campaign. It turns out that Hims’s baldness pills are just finasteride, and their topical solution minoxidil. Thanks to expired patents on those products, Hims is able to sell them cheap. And yet ultimately they’re providing the same old solution. Another false prophet.
Treatment is based on patient preference. Topical minoxidil (2% or 5% solution) is approved for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in men. Hair regrowth is more robust at the vertex than in the frontal area, and will take six to 12 months to improve.5 Treatment should continue indefinitely because hair loss reoccurs when treatment is discontinued. Minoxidil 2% solution is recommended for the treatment of androgenetic alopecia in women.6 Adverse effects include irritant and contact dermatitis.
I also reached out to Histogen and Follicum a few weeks ago as well thanking them for all their hard work in bringing a safe and effective treatment to people all over the globe with hairloss issues and expressed how much we all value these companies. I held back from asking about market release as you had suggested. I received a very nice reply from Histogen.
During this procedure, surgeons remove a narrow strip of scalp and divide it into hundreds of tiny grafts, each containing just a few hairs. Each graft is planted in a slit in the scalp created by a blade or needle in the area of missing hair. Hair grows naturally this way, in small clusters of one to four follicles, called follicular units. As a result, the graft looks better than the larger "plugs" associated with hair transplants of yesteryear.
×