For the first twenty years of my life, I took having hair for granted. One day, in college, I woke up and looked in the mirror, and was convinced that my hair was falling out. Not receding—dropping, that minute. Later that day, I told a roommate. He took a beat, and then asked, not without kindness, “Were you on PCP?” That semester, in a creative-writing workshop, I was moved enough to write a long, confused story about a teen-ager with male-pattern baldness who suffers a meltdown and robs the hot-dog counter where he works. By my late twenties, hair loss was something that I thought about all the time. I understood, largely, that my obsession was a specific expression of a more general anxiety. I’ve never been to therapy. There are many things that have led me to consider it. But one of the most distinct, definable, and pressing has been my obsession with hair loss.
NIZORAL???? What? Are u joking 🙃? NIZORAL make you loose hair , NIZORAL is not á shampoo is a synthetic imidazole antifungal drug used primarily to treat fungal infections. Ketoconazole is sold commercially as a tablet for oral administration (although this use has been discontinued in a number of countries), and in a variety of formulations for topical administration, such as creams (used to treat tinea; cutaneous candidiasis, including candidal paronychia; and pityriasis versicolor) and shampoos (used primarily to treat dandruff—seborrhoeic dermatitis of the scalp).
A DHT Blocker Shampoo is any shampoo formula that contains known DHT inhibiting agents. DHT inhibiting agents usually act by preventing 5 alpha reductase from converting testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Leading research agrees that DHT is the foremost cause of hair loss. DHT binds to sensitive hair follicles causing them to shrink and eventually to stop producing hair altogether.
A very kind and talented hair blogger from Japan, Fuji Maru Kagurazaka, recently contacted me and suggested that the blogs aimed at promoting hair growth treatments/cures for hair loss should unite their efforts and cooperate. While I acknowledge that the websites who are focused on this material are each unique and have their own (and sometimes differing) perspectives, I do believe that civility and solidarity are certainly desirable qualities for this sector.  Fuji wrote up this nice article about my website, check it out (make sure translate is on if you are not fluent in Japanese). And, I encourage you to read his other articles. Fuji has a sincere and highly detailed approach to hair growth blogging. His personality is highly welcomed and refreshing to the online hair community.
Our panel of five people was unanimous in their choice – Shapiro MD. Developed by two leading dermatologists this patented formula has been proven to fight and even reverses hair loss in both men and women.  While some testers found the smell a bit herbal the overall consensus was that it was a fantastic color-safe shampoo and a moisturizing conditioner. In addition, we found their customer service was excellent and they honored their 60-day guarantee.  Shapiro MD designed their shampoo and conditioner with pharmaceutical-grade ingredients.  Shapiro MD’s mission is to develop health and beauty products using only clinically tested ingredients.
And, for all of these collective efforts, Christiano reminded me, the only things that have really worked were discovered accidentally. Soon to join minoxidil and finasteride will be Xeljanz, or tofacitinib: originally developed for rheumatoid arthritis, it has remarkable effects on hair growth for patients with alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder that causes patients to lose hair in big patches over their entire bodies.

Thinning hair in women is worth investigating for more than its impact on physical appearance. While many conditions that lead to temporary hair loss will go away without treatment or with simple lifestyle measures, others may be signs of potentially irreversible loss or health conditions. Others yet may respond well to treatments to promote regrowth, so starting sooner rather than later is key.
Alopecia areata: Researchers believe that this is an autoimmune disease. Autoimmune means the body attacks itself. In this case, the body attacks its own hair. This causes smooth, round patches of hair loss on the scalp and other areas of the body. People with alopecia areata are often in excellent health. Most people see their hair re-grow. Dermatologists treat people with this disorder to help the hair re-grow more quickly.
Studies have indicated that one of the ways to slow hair loss is by maintaining a healthy scalp environment. Regular shampooing aids in the prevention of genetic hair loss by removing excess sebum containing elevated levels of DHT. Unfortunately, there is no silver bullet hair loss shampoo on the market that will regrow a full head of hair in a couple weeks.
Female pattern baldness: Treatment and genetics While most women lose between 50 and 100 strands of hair per day, this hair is usually quickly replaced by new growth. When bald patches or thinning occurs, however, it may be a sign of female pattern baldness. In this article, learn more about the common causes and treatment of hair loss in women. Read now

A very kind and talented hair blogger from Japan, Fuji Maru Kagurazaka, recently contacted me and suggested that the blogs aimed at promoting hair growth treatments/cures for hair loss should unite their efforts and cooperate. While I acknowledge that the websites who are focused on this material are each unique and have their own (and sometimes differing) perspectives, I do believe that civility and solidarity are certainly desirable qualities for this sector.  Fuji wrote up this nice article about my website, check it out (make sure translate is on if you are not fluent in Japanese). And, I encourage you to read his other articles. Fuji has a sincere and highly detailed approach to hair growth blogging. His personality is highly welcomed and refreshing to the online hair community.


In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
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