These days, when forced into windy outdoor situations, Trump is nearly always seen wearing a Make America Great Again cap. But, one wintry, blustery day this February, Trump walked up the steps of Air Force One capless. In the engrossing video footage, you can see the hair on the back of Trump’s head part and rise, shooting up with power, almost in two separate flaps—one to the left, one to the right.
The Holy Grail remains a drug that will promote regrowth, but this might not be so far away. Earlier this year, Manchester University announced that an osteoporosis drug had been found to have “dramatic results” promoting hair growth when applied to tissue samples in pre-clinical trials. The resultant frenzy left the PhD student responsible, Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, a little dazed. “Every other week, something comes out about hair loss and it doesn’t generate as much media coverage as what I experienced,” he grumbles. He’s in this for the science – there aren’t many fields where you get to mess around with real human tissue – but such is the distress caused by hair loss and such is the potential customer base that interest is always high.
While some medical practitioners are still on the fence about the effectiveness of laser treatments, studies have found that hair growth using laser therapy increased by 19 normal-size hairs per square centimetre. The regrowth is also observed as thicker, shinier and more manageable. It's a non-invasive, painless procedure that works for both men and women. However, the LLLT is not a stand-alone cure and is thus used in combination with other treatments.
3. Scalp tonic. Serums with peptides or procyanidins (a class of antioxidants) such as niacinamide can help support overall scalp health and reduce inflammation, which is a major component of hair loss, says New York City dermatologist Doris Day. Try René Furterer Triphasic Progressive Concentrated Serum ($82), Julien Farel Magnifique Delay the Gray Hair & Scalp Serum ($135), or Day’s own Rapid Regrowth Serum ($55) once daily before massaging a minoxidil product into the scalp (there’s no need to wait for it to dry in between). “In addition to being anti-inflammatory,” Day says, “scalp tonics help minoxidil penetrate the scalp better and can minimize potential irritation from it.”
Argan oil is derived from the kernels of the argan tree that is endemic to Morocco. In that country, argan oil has been used for skin and hair problems for centuries.  In the western world, argan oil is now becoming very popular in cosmetic applications. Art Naturals organic argan oil shampoo also includes a huge list of botanical and herbal products, along with essential oils that will improve the texture of your hair significantly.
Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
RepliCel’s technology has proven to grow new hair without transplants, creams or pills because it’s using a patient’s own stem cells to regenerate hair. Buckler said the basis for the company’s science comes from research conducted in the early 2000s in Europe by noted hair biology and dermatology experts Dr. Kevin McElwee, PhD, and Dr. Rolf Hoffmann, MD, who originally discovered the critical cell responsible for hair follicle growth. It is now being tested in human Phase II trials that began in July 2016 in Japan. Two other products of the company are for conditions where there are too few healthy fibroblasts, such as chronic tendinosis and damaged skin.
After the robot was done, two nurses picked off the skin grafts and hairs and put them in petri dishes. While they prepared them for implantation, Bernstein explained the real future of the business: cloning. Bernstein has partnered with a Columbia University geneticist, Angela Christiano, who is working on duplicating hairs. The problem with hair transplantation is that you’re moving hairs around, not creating new ones. Women affected by female-pattern hair loss, in particular, are left out: they don’t have a thick back patch of “donor hair” to work with.
The answer, to be brutally honest, is no. Combine that with the fact that many shampoo manufacturers are hungry for a quick buck and make false claims about ingredients that haven’t been proven to work, and you have a market that can be treacherous to navigate. There are even fake reviews – which is a whole additional layer of deceit when you think about it.
Trichotillomania may be difficult to diagnose if the patient is not forthcoming about pulling at his or her hair. Patients typically present with frontoparietal patches of alopecia that progress posteriorly and may include the eyelashes and eyebrows. Bare patches are typical, and the hair may appear uneven, with twisted or broken off hairs. Trichotillomania may lead to problems with self-esteem and social avoidance. Complications include infection, skin damage, and permanent scarring.18
Certainly a company with a unique background and game plan, HairClone has received some recent media attention. The UK biotech startup was featured in this month’s publication of “Consulting Room” online magazine. In the article both Dr. Bessam Farjo and Paul Kemp of HairClone provided insight as to the company’s current progress and plans for the future. Things seem to be coming along well for HairClone and we should expect to hear from them again within the next several weeks. Full story is on Articles main page.
After the new article featuring Medipost’s hair growth cosmetic was published, Jay Lee PhD of Medipost, began chiming in on the comments section. He first shared that Medipost is currently engaging in a larger clinical trial for the CM3 product which would include higher scale Norwood’s. Then, in a following comment he revealed that Medipost is developing a potentially more advanced hair growth product as well. Here are his words:
Harklinikken (“hair clinic” in Danish) inspires great loyalty. Four out of five users come as referrals from satisfied customers, said Lars Skjoth, the company’s founder and chief scientist. The results are certainly compelling. After four months of daily application — that is, working the tea-colored tonic into the hair section by section, then letting it sit on the scalp for six hours — most users regain at least 30 percent of lost density, and some as much as 60 percent, according to company figures.
Researchers continue to strive for the holy grail of hair loss cures by trying to gain a better understanding of how the hair growth cycle is controlled. Rather than treating the symptoms of hair loss, scientists aim to target the cause, which, in turn, may yield fewer side effects. Recently, there have been numerous discoveries in the hair loss arena that may lead to new promising treatments.
The thing is that these big drug companies have shelled out millions and even billions of dollars to research, develop, market and then sell a drug-based product that consumers want. Therefore, they will do everything in their power to protect and guard their products against any drug-free alternatives. The kicker is even if said alternatives are cheaper and safer for consumers, while also achieving the same goals for them! This is the crux of claim enforcement, which is really about claim ownership and claim protection from the perspective of the big drug companies.
But, there’s an even more important step to take – your participation and contribution. The topic of “a cure for hair loss” or “a hair growth treatment”, for many of us, is one of the most important issues in our lives. What are you doing to support its success? I realize that question may not have previously crossed the mind for many. It’s here now. For a personal example, I’m not a scientist who creates molecules in a lab, so I decided I would organize the hair growth treatment news and spread awareness. It’s been a gratifying practice for me. 
Hair loss shampoos are an excellent addition to any hair loss prevention regime. They are also a cost-effective and convenient way to start treating hair loss. Sure, not many of these have long term clinical studies completed on their efficacy. However, some of these shampoos are chock full of botanicals and herbs that do have some clinical data backing them up.
Dry, brittle strands—whether from heat damage or age—can definitely cause your hair to thin out. With more than 5,000 verified customer reviews, the Pura D’or Gold Label Shampoo gets top marks for its restorative, regenerative, and strand-strengthening properties. Among the shampoo’s 17 active ingredients are red Korean seaweed, which is proven to treat alopecia, and scalp-stimulating black cumin seed oil.
A study led by Dr. Noha Doghaim of Tanta University in Egypt showed that carboxytherapy may be a promising treatment option for both alopecia areata and androgenic alopecia. The study comprised 80 subjects who were treated over the period of three months with either placebo or carboxytherapy.  Both groups found favorable results from the carboxytherapy, however during a follow-up examination the improvements in androgenic alopecia subjects had decreased over time. The researchers noted that continual treatments would be necessary to maintain and bolster the benefits for AGA.
Thyroid medication. Hair loss as a result of thyroid problems will only be solved by treating the root cause. This means that you need to take medications for hypothyroidism in order to address the hormonal imbalance in the body. The most common medication for thyroid problems is levothyroxine, a synthetic version of thyroxine (thyroid hormone). Since the medication is used to address the thyroid problem and hair loss indirectly, the medication has to be continued even when you've gotten better or your hormone level has gone back to normal in order to continue hair growth.
If you’re a gentleman who’s been noticing a receding hairline or is worried about balding, the first step is to schedule a visit with a doctor or dermatologist and make sure your hair loss isn’t a sign of a more serious health issue. “Not all hair loss is male-pattern hair loss,” explains Dr. Marc Glashofer, a board-certified dermatologist specializing in hair loss and practicing in northern New Jersey. A thyroid disorder, an autoimmune disease, or even a scalp issue could be making you look like Bruce Willis in Die Hard 2. But most hair loss is androgenetic alopecia, also known as male-pattern baldness, and fortunately (or not, depending on your perspective), it’s just a symptom of getting older.
While thin hair is nothing to be ashamed of, it's perfectly natural to look for a way to maintain the luscious locks you know and love — and the easiest way to do that is by incorporating the best shampoos for thinning hair into your beauty routine. Whether it's due to stress, hormonal changes, or simply aging, thinning hair and hair loss is something we as women all face at one point or another during our lifetimes. But before we talk about a treatment, let's break down some of the possible reasons behind your thinning hair. 

The researchers from the University of Manchester’s Centre for Dermatology Research uncovered this finding through lab tests. They used samples containing scalp hair follicles from more than 40 male hair-transplant patients. The hair follicles were placed in a medium and treated with the drug. Researchers said that those hair follicles were able to grow again because it suppressed the actions of SFRP1.
"The majority of men lose their hair not through stress, or bad diet, or lack of sleep, but through the genetic trait of male pattern baldness which is hard to treat through shampoos or supplements alone. Women lose their hair for very different reasons, but the argument still stands that a lot of the hair loss products on the market are just offering false hope. That said, there are a few that really work."
Hair is made up of the hair follicle (a pocket in the skin that anchors each hair) and the shaft (the visible fiber above the scalp). In the hair bulb, located at the base of the follicle, cells divide and grow to produce the hair shaft, which is made from a protein called keratin. Papilla that surround the bulb contain tiny blood vessels that nourish the hair follicles and deliver hormones to regulate the growth and structure of the hair.
Dr. Carlos Wesley, a hair restoration surgeon in Manhattan, said that women in his practice respond better to P.R.P. than men do, which may have something to do with the fact that women with genetic hair loss tend to have more inflammatory cells around the follicles. From 2013 to 2014, he said, he had an 83 percent increase in female patients, in part because of P.R.P.

Learn to get used to it. Men with balding hair would like to wear caps as a way to mask or cover-up their thinning hair. But while this is understandable, wearing a cap will not make the issue go away. Rather, by teaching oneself to get used to your new look, the easier it will be to accept and the less awkward you'd feel if you're out in public. Wear a hat only when necessary, that is, if you need scalp protection.

The Brotzu lotion has been back in Italian headlines over the past week. It’s not clear what has prompted this wave of Brotzu news, but we know there has been significant interest surrounding the lotion since it first spread across the international hair-ternet. Recently, enthusiasts have also gone as far to start an online petition advocating for Fidia Pharma and Brotzu to release the heralded lotion. 
Some 30 million women in the United States have hereditary hair loss (compared with 50 million men), according to the American Academy of Dermatology, though that figure does not include the millions more who struggle with thinning hair because of pregnancy, menopause, stress and other health conditions. Barely 5 percent of women are said to be good candidates for hair transplant surgery because women lose hair everywhere, meaning that, unlike with men, there is rarely a luxuriant spot on the back of the head from which to harvest hairs unobtrusively.
Beyond that, things get more controversial, with some doctors saying there's inadequate evidence for other treatments. Saxena thinks there is enough scientific evidence to support some of the alternatives and recommends them to patients. But they are not for women on tight budgets. There's Nutrafol, a "nutraceutical" that costs about $80 a month. Women can also get injections in the scalp of platelet-rich plasma made from their own blood. The first four treatments cost about $2,000 at Saxena's practice in Fort Washington or Lansdale. Maintenance injections, done every three to six months, cost $515 each. Women can also buy Theradome, a light-emitting helmet, for $895 online.  Saxena, who has hair loss herself, said she has had the injections and currently uses minoxidil, spironolactone, and Nutrafol.

Fenugreek. Fenugreek seeds have been found to help in treating hair fall and hair loss. They contain hormones and protein that rebuild the follicles and stimulate growth of hair. Soak a cup of fenugreek seeds in water overnight. Grind it to a paste and apply on your hair. Cover your hair with a shower cap and let it stay for 40 minutes, and then rinse. You can do this every day for a month.
With those pinned down, it wasn’t hard to determine which don’t actually work. Pretty much all the “active” ingredients listed in ineffective treatments — from biotin and zinc to emu oil and saw palmetto — have never been proven, and are instead marketed based on logical-seeming correlations. It would make sense that biotin, a B vitamin readily found in hair, skin, and nails, could help hair grow more quickly. And caffeine is a stimulant that works in coffee, so rubbing some on your scalp might wake some of those sleepy follicles… right?
HairMax is known for their lasercomb products — an FDA approved hair loss treatment. They’ve started to branch out and now they offer a supplement, topical, and this shampoo (as well as a matching conditioner). One of the standout ingredients in this shampoo is the gotu kola. We have a full write up about gotu kola and its relationship to hair loss here.
Certainly a company with a unique background and game plan, HairClone has received some recent media attention. The UK biotech startup was featured in this month’s publication of “Consulting Room” online magazine. In the article both Dr. Bessam Farjo and Paul Kemp of HairClone provided insight as to the company’s current progress and plans for the future. Things seem to be coming along well for HairClone and we should expect to hear from them again within the next several weeks. Full story is on Articles main page.
3. Scalp tonic. Serums with peptides or procyanidins (a class of antioxidants) such as niacinamide can help support overall scalp health and reduce inflammation, which is a major component of hair loss, says New York City dermatologist Doris Day. Try René Furterer Triphasic Progressive Concentrated Serum ($82), Julien Farel Magnifique Delay the Gray Hair & Scalp Serum ($135), or Day’s own Rapid Regrowth Serum ($55) once daily before massaging a minoxidil product into the scalp (there’s no need to wait for it to dry in between). “In addition to being anti-inflammatory,” Day says, “scalp tonics help minoxidil penetrate the scalp better and can minimize potential irritation from it.”
Central centrifugal cicatricial (scarring) alopecia: This type of hair loss occurs most often in women of African descent. It begins in the center of the scalp. As it progresses, the hair loss radiates out from the center of the scalp. The affected scalp becomes smooth and shiny. The hair loss can be very slow or rapid. When hair loss occurs quickly, the person may have tingling, burning, pain, or itching on the scalp. Treatment may help the hair re-grow if scarring has not occurred.

Two clinical trials have been ran as a proof of concept for Histogen. Terminal hair count and hair thickness noticeably increased after just 12 weeks. Due to this success, Histogen plans to conduct a Phase 1 Clinical Study in the United States. This will be an injectable which when injected into the scalp will stimulate dormant hair follicles and induce new hair follicle formation (think Botox but for hair follicles instead of skin cells). HSC660 is an ongoing female hair loss trial that will run for 22 weeks and a late stage (Phase 3 trial) for men has initiated in Mexico. Histogen founder Gail Naughton even went so far to reveal commercialization, “We’e in very late-stage negotiations with some huge retail partners,” she says. It may not be a magic bullet, but it would sure be nice to have an alternative/supplement to Rogaine that actually stimulates growth.

While some medical practitioners are still on the fence about the effectiveness of laser treatments, studies have found that hair growth using laser therapy increased by 19 normal-size hairs per square centimetre. The regrowth is also observed as thicker, shinier and more manageable. It's a non-invasive, painless procedure that works for both men and women. However, the LLLT is not a stand-alone cure and is thus used in combination with other treatments.


Argan oil is loaded with A, C and E vitamins, all of which have been linked to hair growth. When you use argan oil externally as part of a hair loss shampoo, it can help to boost your scalp’s and skin’s cell production, thus causing healthier hair and skin. Argan oil is good for dry, brittle and thinning hair since it guards against you losing more follicles than you’re capable of growing (which makes hair loss noticeable).
Hair transplantation involves harvesting follicles from the back of the head that are DHT resistant and transplanting them to bald areas. A surgeon will remove minuscule plugs of skin that contain a few hairs and implant the plugs where the follicles are inactive. Around 15 percent of hairs emerge from the follicle as a single hair, and 15 percent grow in groups of four or five hairs.
A popular skin care drug—which is intended to target eczema—was just found to have an unusual side effect: hair growth. According to an article on Newsweek, the FDA-approved drug dupilumab was given to a 13-year-old alopecia sufferer to treat her eczema. The patient, who hadn’t grown hair on her scalp since she was two, suddenly grew a significant amount of hair on her head after continual use of the drug, a study in the journal JAMA Dermatology reports.
Of course, there are plenty of men who wish desperately to restore their youthful locks, and a few — we can think of one powerful one — who cling to elaborate comb-overs, but many balding men simply clip their hair short and go on with their lives. Dermatologists say hair loss is emotionally harder for women, who are often deeply embarrassed by thinning hair even though it's quite common. By the time they reach 50, about 40 percent of women are experiencing what's known as female-pattern hair loss, said Gopal Patel, a dermatologist with Aesthetic Dermatology Associates in Media. Women of African descent struggle with even more conditions that can damage hair follicles and cause bald spots.
Certainly a company with a unique background and game plan, HairClone has received some recent media attention. The UK biotech startup was featured in this month’s publication of “Consulting Room” online magazine. In the article both Dr. Bessam Farjo and Paul Kemp of HairClone provided insight as to the company’s current progress and plans for the future. Things seem to be coming along well for HairClone and we should expect to hear from them again within the next several weeks. Full story is on Articles main page.
Nizoral is the gold-standard in hair loss prevention. Its main ingredient is ketoconazole. The nice thing about Nizoral is that you only need to use it twice a week (because ketoconazole binds to the proteins in your hair so it will keep working many days after use). If you were to use it daily your scalp would be drier than a desert and itchy as all heck.
Since PhytoCayne Revitalizing shampoo is so watery, it’s easy to overpour and waste a good amount of this expensive product. That’s one reason we rank it below Revivogen and Nioxin. The more important reason for the #3 ranking is that this shampoo doesn’t do everything that the other two products do. It’s still effective for most users, however, and worth a try.
These days, when forced into windy outdoor situations, Trump is nearly always seen wearing a Make America Great Again cap. But, one wintry, blustery day this February, Trump walked up the steps of Air Force One capless. In the engrossing video footage, you can see the hair on the back of Trump’s head part and rise, shooting up with power, almost in two separate flaps—one to the left, one to the right.
Two clinical trials have been ran as a proof of concept for Histogen. Terminal hair count and hair thickness noticeably increased after just 12 weeks. Due to this success, Histogen plans to conduct a Phase 1 Clinical Study in the United States. This will be an injectable which when injected into the scalp will stimulate dormant hair follicles and induce new hair follicle formation (think Botox but for hair follicles instead of skin cells). HSC660 is an ongoing female hair loss trial that will run for 22 weeks and a late stage (Phase 3 trial) for men has initiated in Mexico. Histogen founder Gail Naughton even went so far to reveal commercialization, “We’e in very late-stage negotiations with some huge retail partners,” she says. It may not be a magic bullet, but it would sure be nice to have an alternative/supplement to Rogaine that actually stimulates growth.
Nizoral is the gold-standard in hair loss prevention. Its main ingredient is ketoconazole. The nice thing about Nizoral is that you only need to use it twice a week (because ketoconazole binds to the proteins in your hair so it will keep working many days after use). If you were to use it daily your scalp would be drier than a desert and itchy as all heck.
According to the press release, a fast track designation is “intended to facilitate the development of new therapies for serious conditions and with the potential to address an unmet medical need. A company with an investigational medicine receiving Fast Track designation may be eligible for more frequent communications with the FDA and may receive an expedited review of the new drug application.”

Drugs normally used for rheumatoid arthritis and bone marrow cancer, they are now being studied for their uses as a hair growth medicine. These are a new class of medicines labeled as JAK inhibitors. In one study, 6 out of 9 patients dramatically went from bald to a full head of hair after taking Ruxolitinib for 5 months. In another study several subjects were able to regrow full heads of hair. Unfortunately, sustained use of such drugs will have severe side effects. Many of these concerns would be side stepped if a topical formula could be developed. Researchers at the Department of Dermatology and Genetics and Development at Columbia University Medical center are now studying other JAK inhibitors in placebo controlled studies.

Weinstein has big dark eyebrows and a kind face. Kind of an Elliott Gould vibe. I looked at his head. There was a spotty, thatchy outcropping of gray-black hair. Not exactly an overflowing abundance, but hair, to be sure. “I had nothing on top,” Weinstein said. “You can see—I grew my hair back! And it grew back more or less the color I had when I was young.”


Hair changes about as fast as grass grows, which is to say it’s extraordinarily slow and not visible to anyone checking impatiently in the mirror every day. But during regular follow-up appointments, Harklinikken uses high-tech equipment to photograph and magnify the scalp and count new hairs and active follicles, which motivates users to adhere to the regimen. Too many people give up on treatments like Rogaine and low-level-light devices before they’ve had a chance to work, Dr. Senna said.
“The DHT hormone (dihydrotestosterone) can contribute to thinning in women who are genetically predisposed to female pattern thinning,” Fusco says. For those whose case falls into this category, she advises a prescription shampoo with ketoconazole 2 percent, as it has anti-androgenic properties. “Ketoconazole has been proposed to disrupt the pathway of DHT leading to thinning of follicles.”
The answer, to be brutally honest, is no. Combine that with the fact that many shampoo manufacturers are hungry for a quick buck and make false claims about ingredients that haven’t been proven to work, and you have a market that can be treacherous to navigate. There are even fake reviews – which is a whole additional layer of deceit when you think about it.

Hair grooming, but more importantly, having a head-full of hair is as important to men as it is to women. To women, it may be an important accessory of beauty, and for men, it adds to a sense of manliness, enhances their looks and makes them more appealing and attractive to women. Balding to men is associated with aging (only old men are expected to lose hair) and therefore, having hair on one's head is a sign of virility and masculinity.
About one-third of women experience hair loss (alopecia) at some time in their lives; among postmenopausal women, as many as two-thirds suffer hair thinning or bald spots. Hair loss in women often has a greater impact than hair loss does on men w, because it's less socially acceptable for them. Alopecia can severely affect a woman's emotional well-being and quality of life.
You may not know it, but stress affects your health in a number of different ways. It can zap your energy, make you feel physically ill, and even cause your hair to fall out. That’s right, stress plays a big role in contributing to thinning hair. On its own, stress-related hair loss is usually temporary and grows back over time. However, it can also speed up other forms of hair loss like male pattern baldness.
P.R.P., considered a nonsurgical treatment, is not covered by insurance, and clinical studies about its effectiveness (and longevity of results) are not conclusive because different doctors use different mixes. But P.R.P. has a long (though also inconclusive) history of use elsewhere in the body. Athletes like Kobe Bryant have received the treatment in an attempt to heal injuries.
You always hear these stories about people who take a homeopathic approach to fighting baldness. It’s always some off-the-wall remedy like smearing a paste of ginger and cayenne pepper on your scalp three times a day or eating a special type of ginseng farmed only in a rural village in Tibet. We'll go on the record to say that it's highly unlikely that these remedies work at any level.
“I think their effectiveness is not as significant as finasteride or minoxidil,” says Dr. Wolfeld, “however, it’s something that can be used quite easily by patients at home. If they use it two or three times a week, I tell them it can help to thicken their hair.” Results can take up to 18 months to show up, so Dr. Wolfeld stresses that patience is a virtue.
7/26/18 Update: After positive early data, various trials of JAK inhibitors such as Ruxolitinib and Xeljanz are underway. Columbia researchers have had positive results with Xeljanz in 11 out of 12 subjects achieving some regrowth with no adverse side effects over 16 months of treatment. Investigators at Stanford and Yale are conducting three trials of oral and topical tofacitnib and Locks of Love Foundation is fuding another ruxolitinib study. At this time, there are about 15 publications looking at JAK inhibitors and their relationship to alopecia and its variants.

*all photos are models and not actual patients.If you are interested in a prescription product, Hims will assist in setting up a visit for you with an independent physician who will evaluate whether or not you are an appropriate candidate for the prescription product and if appropriate, may write you a prescription for the product which you can fill at the pharmacy of your choice.
Skeptics (among them, Dr. Wesley) are starting to come around after a 2014 randomized double-blind study published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology found a “statistically significant” difference in hair density for women who used a laser comb compared with those who used a sham device. (“Comb” is something of a misnomer. The device looks like a hairbrush crossed with a cordless phone; it is glided back and forth across the scalp, roughly a half-inch at a time, usually about 15 minutes three times a week.)
Hair growth company, Follicum of Sweden, announced today that their phase 2a trial for scalp hair growth has reached over 50% enrollment. The trial is scheduled to enroll 60 patients total who will receive injections of FOL-005, Follicum’s hair growth peptide. The study is designed to evaluate the hair growth response from different dosages of FOL-005.  Patients receive injections 3 times per week for 3 months total, for the duration of the study. The study is expected to be completed in 2018. Let’s hope Follicum finds some healthy and eager volunteers to round out their study pool asap.

“The most common cause of hair loss in both men and women is androgenetic alopecia, which is genetic pattern hair loss,” explains Dr. Michael B. Wolfeld, a board-certified plastic surgeon and an assistant clinical professor of plastic surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. The root cause of this type of hair loss is dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a byproduct of testosterone that shrinks certain hair follicles until they eventually stop producing hair.

More good research coming from the University of Alabama at Birmingham shows that a certain gene affecting mitochondrial function can dramatically reverse signs of aging in mice. The aging factors which were shown to be reversible include skin wrinkles, gray hair, and hair loss. Next comes the important phase where the researchers continue forward to translate this discovery to human use. Full article on the front page.
I recently published an article covering a story in the press of SkinTE helping to possibly save the life of a burn patient (see Articles). In that post I shared an image from SkinTE’s website which shows an application for hair growth. What some may not be aware of is the fact that Dr. Denver Lough, CEO of PolarityTE, has done some legitimate hair follicle research while at Johns Hopkins University. Whether or not this will increase the chances of a “HairTE” product to become a success, we can’t say. However, it may be of interest to recall two peer reviewed articles that Lough and colleagues published involving the proteins LGR5+ and LGR6+ stem cells and hair growth.
In essence, it is widely known as Microneedling, and it has the power to completely revive your head and scalp from within. It will, among other things, help rejuvenate your scalp skin, help remove old skin cells and embedded oils (sebum) that are currently blocking and clogging your hair follicles, and most of all, it will reactivate the hair follicles in your head to make them grow hairs again. How amazing is that?
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