Researchers from South Korea have identified a new peptide called PTD-DBM which exhibits wound healing and hair regeneration effects in preclinical studies. The research is being led by Professor Kang-Yell Choi of Yonsei University. Choi’s team identified the peptide PTD-DBM which targets a protein called CXXC5. The interaction of these two proteins leads to stimulation of the Wnt pathway, which then initiates hair follicle neogenesis. Choi hopes to develop this peptide further into a potential hair growth drug candidate. A research paper about these findings was put out by the team earlier this year. Source article about this development here.
“I think their effectiveness is not as significant as finasteride or minoxidil,” says Dr. Wolfeld, “however, it’s something that can be used quite easily by patients at home. If they use it two or three times a week, I tell them it can help to thicken their hair.” Results can take up to 18 months to show up, so Dr. Wolfeld stresses that patience is a virtue.
Some 30 million women in the United States have hereditary hair loss (compared with 50 million men), according to the American Academy of Dermatology, though that figure does not include the millions more who struggle with thinning hair because of pregnancy, menopause, stress and other health conditions. Barely 5 percent of women are said to be good candidates for hair transplant surgery because women lose hair everywhere, meaning that, unlike with men, there is rarely a luxuriant spot on the back of the head from which to harvest hairs unobtrusively.

This shampoo is formulated specifically for women and created by a famous Parisian hair stylist (who used to care for famous hair like that of Jackie Onassis and Catherine Deneuve). PhytoCayne feels very different when you use it; it’s thin, almost as thin as water. The key isn’t what the shampoo feels like, though, it’s how it works. And regular female users are almost unanimous in their praise for this product.


Examination of the scalp in patients with telogen effluvium typically shows uniform hair thinning. The presence of erythema, scaling, or inflammation; altered or uneven hair distribution; or changes in shaft caliber, length, shape, or fragility may suggest other diagnoses. Laboratory investigations are indicated if the history and physical examination findings suggest underlying systemic disorders (e.g., iron deficiency anemia, zinc deficiency, renal or liver disease, thyroid disease).
From the top of my head, I don’t remember if the Lipogaine’s Big 3 Shampoo contains ketoconazole but if it does, then that’s a definite plus. Another thing you can do is buy Nizoral and use it in conjunction with The Big 5 Shampoo. So for example, use Nizoral on Mondays and Thursdays and The Big 5 in all the days in between. That way you’d get all the benefits.
The cause of female-pattern hair loss is unknown, but doctors said there is a strong genetic component. The risk can come from male or female relatives. Though it looks as if the hair is falling out, that's not really what's happening. Cotsarelis said hair follicles are becoming smaller and producing hairs that may be so small that you can't see them.  Women tend to retain more normal, thick hairs than balding men do.
Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
Dr. Hawkshaw and his team were lead to test WAY-316606 for hair growth after studying the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA) on hair growth. They found that CsA reduced the expression of SFRP1 in human hair follicles. After looking for other drug candidates that had a similar effect on SFRP1, WAY-316606 was identified. The team has already tested WAY-316606 on isolated human hair follicles which were donated from hair transplant surgeries, and plans to test the drug in human clinical trials in the future. A timeline for a human clinical trial has not been set yet, Follicle Thought will update this as news is presented.
Coming to terms with hair loss can be the source of a lot of unwanted stress and frustration. After all, we're quite attached to our hair. Even though a lot of men pull off the bald look extremely well, saying goodbye to a thick head of hair is difficult. But what if I told you that experiencing hair loss doesn't mean that you have to go bald? In fact, with the right treatment program, you might be able to stop the dreaded receding hairline.

McElwee is an associate professor in the Department of Dermatology and Skin Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in British Columbia, Canada and director of the Hair Research Laboratory in the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHI) at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH). A hair research scientist, McElwee is one of only a small group of research scientists worldwide who studies hair biology and associated diseases.
A separate study, published in Skin Therapy Letter — a professional reference site for dermatologists — found that women also benefit from using the more potent 5 percent minoxidil treatment. “Patient-reported improvement in hair volume and coverage appears to be greater with 5 percent minoxidil foam,” reads the report. Plus, because the 5 percent treatment is stronger, women only have to apply it once a day to get the same results as they would with the 2 percent treatment applied twice daily.
McElwee is an associate professor in the Department of Dermatology and Skin Health at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in British Columbia, Canada and director of the Hair Research Laboratory in the Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHI) at Vancouver General Hospital (VGH). A hair research scientist, McElwee is one of only a small group of research scientists worldwide who studies hair biology and associated diseases.
The trick about all of these hair-loss products and treatments is that they’ll stop working as soon as you stop using them. “They have to be ready for a lifetime commitment,” says Rieder. But, just like brushing your teeth, as long you keep on keeping on with the scientifically proven preventative treatments, those hairs on your head should be just fine.
If you're dealing with premature hair loss, you know how frustrating it can be to treat. What can be equally as frustrating is trying to find hair products that will actually help remedy thinning or breaking locks. To help you navigate the confusing world of hair loss, I reached out to Manhattan-based dermatologist Dr. Joshua Zeichner and used his recommendations to find the best shampoo and conditioner for hair loss.
P.R.P., considered a nonsurgical treatment, is not covered by insurance, and clinical studies about its effectiveness (and longevity of results) are not conclusive because different doctors use different mixes. But P.R.P. has a long (though also inconclusive) history of use elsewhere in the body. Athletes like Kobe Bryant have received the treatment in an attempt to heal injuries.
Follicular Unit Extraction (FUE). In this method, instead of taking out a whole sample strip, small, individual follicle grafts are cut using a machine and then transplanted. The process is more tedious and more time-consuming, but has been known to have a higher recovery rate and there are no risks of scarring because no cuts and stitches are required.
A diet that is poor or lacking in certain nutrients, particularly iron, protein, and vitamin B, which are essential in the production of keratin, can cause a long telogen phase and a very short anagen stage. On the other hand, excess supply of vitamin A in the body, especially those taken through supplements, can prove to be toxic and can cause a range of adverse body effects including loss of appetite, fatigue and consequently, hair loss.

7/26/18 Update: After positive early data, various trials of JAK inhibitors such as Ruxolitinib and Xeljanz are underway. Columbia researchers have had positive results with Xeljanz in 11 out of 12 subjects achieving some regrowth with no adverse side effects over 16 months of treatment. Investigators at Stanford and Yale are conducting three trials of oral and topical tofacitnib and Locks of Love Foundation is fuding another ruxolitinib study. At this time, there are about 15 publications looking at JAK inhibitors and their relationship to alopecia and its variants.
Kerastem, a company developing an autologous fat-derived stem cell therapy for hair growth, has reported positive data from their phase 2 trial. The results have come from a 6 month clinical trial involving 70 patients. In this study, the patients received a one-time injection of fat-derived stem cells, and purified fat, into their scalp. Kerastem reports an average increase of 29 hairs per cm2 from the treatment, or an increase of 17% from baseline. The press release does mention that the treatment “successfully stimulates hair growth in people with early stage hair loss”, so that is something to take into consideration when evaluating the results. For more info visit Kerastem’s website. 
The general medical consensus around laser treatments — caps and combs alike — is that low-level laser light therapy stimulates the cells within the hair follicle. These devices may also increase cell metabolism to promote thicker and more durable hair shafts, something that neither minoxidil or finasteride can do. To use the HairMax Ultima, all you have to do is glide the device over your scalp slowly. Treatments should take about eight minutes, and you should do it three days per week for the best results.
A clinical researcher who has spent decades researching the fields of pattern hair loss, alopecia areata, endocrinology of the hair follicle and hair follicle morphogenesis, Hoffmann works in his private practice, as a teaching professor in the Department of Dermatology at the University of Marburg and as a researcher on histopathology on hair diseases. He has participated in dozens of clinical hair studies and is the inventor of TrichoScan®, a computerized technique to measure hair growth.

Women’s magazine ‘New Beauty’ recently featured several prospective hair growth therapies in a print article. The feature contains several interesting and worthwhile anecdotes. Check the Articles main page to read about Dr. Cotsarelis’ new research on setipiprant for female alopecia, Histogen’s view on the number of injection sessions which may be necessary to get the most out of HSC, and more.
Lately I’ve been receiving a few inquiries from readers about Shiseido and Brotzu release dates. So, I’m going to address the situation here and hope that this will be sufficient until more news comes from direct sources. I estimate that these companies would publicly address the release date of their products by the end of Q3 this year (end of Sept). As consumers we know there’s no guarantees for releases and if one or both of these products reached the market this year it would be a very fortunate situation. So, keep an eye out, but loosen the grip a little. The news will come when it comes. When there is news it will be visible here.
The test involves plucking about 50 hairs from the head, typically at the back of the scalp, so your dermatologist can look at them under a microscope and determine how much of the hair is in the resting, growth, and fall-out phases. Next, a vial of blood is sent to a lab to check hormone and nutrient levels ($100 and up, depending on insurance). If low levels of iron, or high levels of male hormones, like androgens, are contributing to your hair loss, for example, both can be treated through oral supplements or medication.
In this section we take a look at current hair loss cures in 2018. Using one or more of the treatments below is your best shot at keeping your hair around. However, if a cure is defined as a permanent fix to an ailment, these are far from that definition. Each of these treatments have their own limitations. Most are seen more as hair loss management treatments, rather than permanent hair loss cures.
3. Surgical hair replacement. If you opt for hair transplantation (which runs $5,000 and up), your dermatologist or hair-replacement surgeon will remove single hair follicles from the back of the head, near the nape of the neck, where your hair is fullest. Once those follicles are harvested, they are then dissected and reimplanted into an area of the scalp where hair is thinning. The procedure takes anywhere from three to six hours, and newly implanted hair will usually begin to grow on its own 3 to 12 months after the treatment session. Traditionally, hair transplantation required removal of an entire strip of scalp, Sadick says, but this new follicle-by-follicle technique looks more natural when it heals and allows patients to get heads of hair as dense-looking as before they started losing it.
Thyroid medication. Hair loss as a result of thyroid problems will only be solved by treating the root cause. This means that you need to take medications for hypothyroidism in order to address the hormonal imbalance in the body. The most common medication for thyroid problems is levothyroxine, a synthetic version of thyroxine (thyroid hormone). Since the medication is used to address the thyroid problem and hair loss indirectly, the medication has to be continued even when you've gotten better or your hormone level has gone back to normal in order to continue hair growth.
In fact, the Japanese government has recently committed to establish a new approval process for regenerative medicine products focused on accelerating approval timelines. As it turns out, hair loss is a big concern in Asian countries. Buckler said some 21% of adult males and 6% of females in China suffer from hormone-driven hair loss.  And the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery’s (ISHRS) biennial survey of hair restoration physicians found that the number of hair restoration patients in Asia increased 345% from 2004 to 2010.
But Buckler said hair growth isn’t the only perk to his company’s discovery. It turns out that use in skin repair and tendon regeneration are also possibilities of the technology. “While we were delving deep into the hair follicle, we discovered another cell population,” he said. The hair follicle is actually a minor organ. There are two different cell groupings. One grows hair fibers. Another grows the tissue that the hair follicle fiber grows in.” And it is within this latter cell grouping that the magical main structural protein found in skin and other connective tissues—collagen—is found.
We've heard it all before: clients waking up one day in shock after discovering a coin-sized bald spot on their heads; women agonizing over the strands of hair they see on the shower floor; men looking for topical creams and shampoos to prevent the early onset of balding. Even more are tales of men and women on the search for the perfect wig or toupee to cover up the loss of their hair as a result of medication for a chronic illness.
Over the past year, the Hair Restoration Laboratories’ Professional Strength DHT Blocking Hair Loss Shampoo (and accompanying DHT Blocking Hair Loss Conditioner) has been a top seller on Amazon and many other sites. Combined, the daily use Shampoo and Conditioner has more DHT blockers than any shampoo/conditioner set presently available. Among the key DHT Blockers in this set are: Caffeine, Saw Palmetto, Black Cumin Seed Oil, Cayenne Fruit Extract, Rosemary Leaf Oil, Pumpkin Seed Oil, Green Tea Leaf Extract, Pea Extract and many more. By helping to block DHT, they should be a great asset in helping to halt the miniaturization of the hair follicles and regrow healthier and thicker hair.
Besides cost considerations, a hair transplant is generally prescribed as a last resort for permanent hair loss problems. It is also not allowed for people under the age of 25, those with a continuing problem of hair loss, as well as those with other health conditions like uncontrolled diabetes, serious heart problems and hypertension. Patients whose hair loss is caused by other factors, such as a skin or scalp disorder or who suffer from a psychological condition that causes them to pull at their hair are not recommended for this procedure. Since the procedure requires taking a sample from the back of the head, those who do not have enough follicles from this section that can be used for transplant are not also eligible.
While you are waiting for the Big breakthrough, You may want to give Rosemary and Lavender essential oil a shot. I have found that my scalp feels much healthier after using this treatment once a week. I’m in hopes it is stimulating new hair growth as well. Check out some recipes online and reply with your thoughts or other techniques you find helpful. Let’s help each other fight the good fight against hair loss!
Procerin Shampoo for hair loss is part of the Procerin For Men system. Recommended by many doctors and dermatologists it is available over-the-counter without a prescription. Procerin can help reverse hair loss in men suffering from Alopecia Areata and male pattern baldness.  >The Shampoo contains all-natural, powerful DHT blockers that have been tested. Procerin does not use any fillers, preservatives, artificial ingredients or additives. No dangerous or harmful side effects have been reported.  When combined with Procerin Supplement it is our best shampoo for men.

Our hair is part of what we call the integumentary system of the human body, which also includes the skin and nails. Hair is, in fact, a type of modified skin. It is made up of keratin, a form of protein, and is produced in tunnel-like structures in the skin called follicles. Inside the hair follicle is the hair bulb that is comprised of cells that deposit keratin and melanin, which is responsible for giving your hair its color. The hair that breaks through your skin from the follicle is the hair shaft. The shaft is basically composed of dead cells comprised of keratin fibres. In fact, the totality of hair on our head is a huge lump of dead cells, which explains why we don't experience any pain when we go for a haircut.
DH—or as it’s less commonly known, Dihydrotestosterone—is the bodily byproduct that (in the TL;DR explanation) shrinks hair follicles until they’re so thin and short they just fall out. Keranique’s unique blend includes a DHT-inhibitor, which penetrates the scalp and follicles to deliver a keratin amino complex, developed to add resilience and protection. This one can contribute to improved texture, healthier strands, and yes, even new growth.
“We are extremely pleased with the continued development of the patent portfolio we exclusively licensed from Columbia.  This new issuance continues to expand the breadth and depth of our JAK inhibitor intellectual property portfolio covering methods of use for certain JAK inhibitors for the treatment of hair loss disorders. The issuance of this patent is another step in the development of a robust patent portfolio relating to JAK inhibition and hair loss,”
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