I am a 45 yr female that has experienced hair loss to the point of having to hire a plumber twice (over 3 years) to unclog our drain in our main bathroom although I am pretty cautious about picking up my hair. My ponytail is about 1/2 the size that it was 5 years ago. i had excessive hair loss after the birth of my last 2 of 3 children. It is noticeably thinner although my employees, friends and husband seem to think my hair is thick. I can see my scalp very easily. (No patchy alopecia though) I started using viviascal professional strength about 2 months ago and hair surge shampoo only about 2 weeks ago. The bottle has about 1/3 left and i am wondering what is to be expected from this product. I have to use at least 8 pumps ( it seems to be double the volume of normal shampoo that i use) and it does not seem to later that well until after a min or so. Additonally i am using the hair surge supplement. When should i see less hair falling out? When should i expect visible results. Any other suggestions? I know it says to use 5 of 7 days, but i use it daily to make sure i am getting the full benefit ( if any) from this product. Currently i am looking at 100 buck a month for the shampoo alone if i keep this up. Any advice is welcome. Thanks
Hey Frederique, I removed it because it was no longer available for some reason. I’m not sure how well can these shampoos work if you are going through chemo. How you consulted your doctor about it? Ask if minoxidil is safe for your situation. It may be the best solution for your case since your cause for hair loss is not due to DHT. But please don’t take my word for it, consult with a doctor first.

The Holy Grail remains a drug that will promote regrowth, but this might not be so far away. Earlier this year, Manchester University announced that an osteoporosis drug had been found to have “dramatic results” promoting hair growth when applied to tissue samples in pre-clinical trials. The resultant frenzy left the PhD student responsible, Dr Nathan Hawkshaw, a little dazed. “Every other week, something comes out about hair loss and it doesn’t generate as much media coverage as what I experienced,” he grumbles. He’s in this for the science – there aren’t many fields where you get to mess around with real human tissue – but such is the distress caused by hair loss and such is the potential customer base that interest is always high.
The history and physical examination are often sufficient to determine a specific etiology for hair loss. It is convenient to divide the various causes into focal (patchy) and diffuse etiologies, and proceed accordingly. Patchy hair loss is often due to alopecia areata, tinea capitis, and trichotillomania. Diffuse hair loss is commonly due to telogen or anagen effluvium. Androgenetic alopecia may be diffuse or in a specific pattern, and may progress to complete baldness.

The third and fourth stages are known as telogen and exogen, respectively. In telogen, the hair is supposed to be at "rest" until it finally detaches itself from the follicle and enters the exogen or shedding stage. Once the hair is detached from the follicle, the follicle remains inactive for about three months, after which a new cycle begins again.
Treatment for adults with less than 50% of scalp involvement is intralesional triamcinolone acetonide injected intradermally using a 0.5-inch, 30-gauge needle. Maximal volume is 3 mL per session.11 Treatment may be repeated every four to six weeks until resolution or for a maximum of six months. Local adverse effects include transient atrophy and telangiectasia.
Finasteride (Propecia). The drug is recommended for male use only, and is in pill form. The drug basically slows down hair loss, while promoting gradual hair growth. The drug works by stopping the enzyme, type II 5-alpha reductas, which is known to produce DHT. The dosage is one pill a day, and has been found to be effective on 80% of men. Like minoxidil, it works best if the bald patches still have tiny, fine hairs. Results are visible within six to three months, and studies of those who have continued its use for two years show longer, thicker hair than those who used it for only for a short time.
Researchers from South Korea have identified a new peptide called PTD-DBM which exhibits wound healing and hair regeneration effects in preclinical studies. The research is being led by Professor Kang-Yell Choi of Yonsei University. Choi’s team identified the peptide PTD-DBM which targets a protein called CXXC5. The interaction of these two proteins leads to stimulation of the Wnt pathway, which then initiates hair follicle neogenesis. Choi hopes to develop this peptide further into a potential hair growth drug candidate. A research paper about these findings was put out by the team earlier this year. Source article about this development here.
It is called the vampire treatment because blood is taken from the patient that removes the platelet rich plasma. Then, the PRP is injected back into the scalp. This energizes the scalp with new active blood flow. Treatment is available at select clinics but widespread adoption may become the norm. It is less invasive than hair transplants but costs more if you count the cost of doing many sessions.
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