Hair transplants will likely lead to better results in the long run (you are introducing new hairs to the balding areas), but you’ll still need to use minoxidil or finasteride after surgery to maintain the results. Like all hair loss treatments, hair transplants are best when combined with other methods, and you’ll want to speak with your doctor to see what combination is best for you.
2. Oil-rich conditioner. “Oils improve hair’s tensile strength,” says Paradi Mirmirani, a hair-loss specialist and dermatologist in Vallejo, California. In other words, oils make hair less likely to break under pressure, which is especially important for thinning hair that’s prone to snapping when brushed or styled. Mirmirani recommends using a conditioner fortified with natural oils, like Burt’s Bees Very Volumizing Pomegranate Conditioner, which contains avocado oil ($8), or Honest Company Conditioner with coconut oil ($10). That one’s got an added benefit: “Coconut oil has been shown to penetrate hair,” says cosmetic chemist Randy Schueller, so it makes your hair stronger from the inside out. (Just don’t load up on pure coconut oil. “You might overshampoo your hair to get it out, and then you’ll end up drying your hair and undoing any benefit,” says Fusco.)
Scientists from the Indiana University School of Medicine have for the first time created skin with hair follicles using mice stem cells. Research was led by Professor Karl Koehler. The team was able to grow both the epidermis and dermis layers of skin to create a realistic skin model. An interesting quote from Professor Koehler: “It looks like a little ball of pocket lint that floats around in the culture medium. The skin develops as a spherical cyst and then the hair follicles grow outward in all directions – like dandelion seeds.”
JW Pharma, a Korean biotech company that specializes in the Wnt pathway, has entered a cooperative agreement with the University of Pennsylvania to development a compound called CWL08006 for hair regeneration purposes. JW Pharma has a pool of Wnt targeting therapies, and apparently CWL08006 makes a great candidate for hair growth. Of course, Dr. George Cotsarelis of UPenn is involved, and the two teams plan to begin preclinical testing by 2019 (I’m a little surprised at that timeline for preclinical). One of the more interesting facets of the report, JW intends “to accelerate its commercialization by launching tests on the human body for cosmetics that utilizes the drug’s mechanism, next year.” If the candidate works well in the cosmetic tests, a version of it could be made available much sooner than the clinical drug pathway, but for now it’s not possible to speculate a time frame for that yet. Good news all in all. 
Try balayam yoga. Balayam yoga (also called balam yoga) is an ancient acupressure exercise associated with hair growth. It comes from the Hindu words, Bal, which means hair, and Vyayam meaning exercise. The exercise involves rubbing the fingernails on both hands together to stimulate activity in the scalp. It has been known to help cure pattern baldness in men and women if done correctly and frequently over a long period of time.

Because there are a lot of products in the crowded marketplace that claim they can regrow your hair, it’s a necessity for the legitimate ones to have disclaimers on their websites. Essentially, these disclaimers state that the products haven’t been evaluated by the FDA and so can’t be guaranteed to provide the benefits they claim to provide—at least not from the standpoint of the regulators.
“It all comes from the tissue taken from the back of the head. The hair follicle has a lot of Type 1 collagen in it,” he said. “We can isolate the hair-growing or collagen-producing cells and use them to start hair growth or regenerate degenerative tendons or tissues of skin. And it is a more natural way of doing it. There is nothing more natural than using your own cells to make your skin look healthy, to heal damaged tendons or to have a thicker head of hair.” 

Once male-pattern baldness starts, it’s not going to stop until every last hair on your head has shrunk or shed, though the rate at which this happens differs from person to person and depends on genetics. And since the grind of hair loss is unending, it’s important to start treatment as soon as your hairline starts bothering you. If you’re looking for a more quantitative metric, Dr. Paul McAndrews, clinical professor of dermatology at the USC School of Medicine and member of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery, assures me that “you have to lose half your hair before the human eye can tell.” (Of course, if you don’t care about losing your hair and are fine with going full Prince William and shaving your head, go for it. We’ve got some recommendations for razors and hair trimmers to help you out on that front.)
Key features: Ducray's Kelual Anti-Dandruff shampoo is the best choice for hair loss from severe dandruff or scalp issues. Dr. Zeichner specifically recommended the Ducray brand for soothing inflammation and itchiness on the scalp caused by seborrheic dermatitis. At $28 for a 3.3-ounce bottle, this is a pricier option, but people say the heavy-duty formula really works for severe dandruff.

 Crown is also great for helping keep frizzy hair under control.  If your hair is quite fine you may find that the aloe vera in Apex Crown is too heavy. You may want to try regenepure nt, as it does not contain aloe vera but uses caffeine as the main ingredient.  Another organic product that has proven effective is PhytoWorx. It has a more pleasant aroma and uses organic ingredients including rosemary oil, olive oil, and fruit extracts. Studies have indicated rosemary oil might work as well as minoxidil.

In my opinion this shampoo has a "manly" smell. No flowers or sweet smells which is ok. Maybe it's an herb smell. Its not too overpowering and its a scent that is acceptable to both of us which is nice since my husband and I are both using this shampoo. He is real impressed with it and says his hair feels softer. He also thinks it is getting thicker on the top. I see him every day so I'm not sure I notice it. We have only been using it for a month or two so I don't really think that's enough time to see drastic improvement. I did notice the other day that he needs a hair cut so it may be that his is growing faster. I also noticed that I have little short hair sticking up all over my head so I obviously have new growth! I haven't really noticed a reduction in the amount of hair that I am losing but I am so excited to know that I have new hair coming in. I will be 50 this year and my husband is 51 so I know that our hair loss is a normal aging thing but neither of us like it and have tried several different shampoos looking for something that will stop the hair loss. I guess if we can't stop it we'll settle for new growth! Our first bottle of Biotin Shampoo is almost empty and I have decided to get another bottle instead of moving on to something else. This stuff is definitely worth staying with for a while to see how much the hair growth and reduction will improve.
Over the past year, the Hair Restoration Laboratories’ Professional Strength DHT Blocking Hair Loss Shampoo (and accompanying DHT Blocking Hair Loss Conditioner) has been a top seller on Amazon and many other sites. Combined, the daily use Shampoo and Conditioner has more DHT blockers than any shampoo/conditioner set presently available. Among the key DHT Blockers in this set are: Caffeine, Saw Palmetto, Black Cumin Seed Oil, Cayenne Fruit Extract, Rosemary Leaf Oil, Pumpkin Seed Oil, Green Tea Leaf Extract, Pea Extract and many more. By helping to block DHT, they should be a great asset in helping to halt the miniaturization of the hair follicles and regrow healthier and thicker hair.
Yet another company has made news this week for phase 2 trial progress. Concert Pharmaceuticals announced today that they have completed enrollment for their phase 2a trial using CTP-543 in alopecia areata. CTP-543 is an oral JAK inhibitor which acts on JAK 1 and 2, it’s also known as ruxolitinib. Concert’s version of ruxolitinib has been modified by the company’s proprietary deuterium chemistry technology which the company hopes will improve its effects on AA.
Literally jumping right out of the woodwork, the company “HCell” has announced they have been granted an orphan designation from the US FDA for their novel treatment of pediatric alopecia areata. The treatment itself it described as a “topical Injection by regenerating hair through a proprietary blend of commercially procured biologic and autologous tissue.” The company also mentions having a treatment for androgenic alopecia in the works as well. More info to come soon. News release here. 

“I think their effectiveness is not as significant as finasteride or minoxidil,” says Dr. Wolfeld, “however, it’s something that can be used quite easily by patients at home. If they use it two or three times a week, I tell them it can help to thicken their hair.” Results can take up to 18 months to show up, so Dr. Wolfeld stresses that patience is a virtue.


A popular skin care drug—which is intended to target eczema—was just found to have an unusual side effect: hair growth. According to an article on Newsweek, the FDA-approved drug dupilumab was given to a 13-year-old alopecia sufferer to treat her eczema. The patient, who hadn’t grown hair on her scalp since she was two, suddenly grew a significant amount of hair on her head after continual use of the drug, a study in the journal JAMA Dermatology reports.
Certainly a company with a unique background and game plan, HairClone has received some recent media attention. The UK biotech startup was featured in this month’s publication of “Consulting Room” online magazine. In the article both Dr. Bessam Farjo and Paul Kemp of HairClone provided insight as to the company’s current progress and plans for the future. Things seem to be coming along well for HairClone and we should expect to hear from them again within the next several weeks. Full story is on Articles main page.

A study led by Dr. Noha Doghaim of Tanta University in Egypt showed that carboxytherapy may be a promising treatment option for both alopecia areata and androgenic alopecia. The study comprised 80 subjects who were treated over the period of three months with either placebo or carboxytherapy.  Both groups found favorable results from the carboxytherapy, however during a follow-up examination the improvements in androgenic alopecia subjects had decreased over time. The researchers noted that continual treatments would be necessary to maintain and bolster the benefits for AGA.


Finasteride has limitations though, such as the requirement of daily treatment, a limit to how many damaged hair follicles it can revive, and that it may lose its effectiveness overtime for some people. This drug has shown to be better at preventing further hair loss than reversing it (regrowth). Just keep in mind that some side effects might make the hair loss seem more appealing.
The beauty of Nizoral is that it performs three tasks simultaneously; 1) it cleanses the scalp, 2) its anti-fungal properties combat dandruff, and 3) it blocks androgen receptors to deter hair loss. Some caution should be taken when using Nizoral, however, because some studies have shown that leaving it on your hair for an extended period (i.e., five minutes or more) can cause rashes and irritation. Be careful if you have sensitive skin.
Jimenez, J. J., Wikramanayake, T. C., Bergfeld, W., Hordinsky, M., Hickman, J. G., Hamblin, M. R., & Schachner, L. A. (2014). Efficacy and Safety of a Low-level Laser Device in the Treatment of Male and Female Pattern Hair Loss: A Multicenter, Randomized, Sham Device-controlled, Double-blind Study. American Journal of Clinical Dermatology, 15(2), 115–127.
Central centrifugal cicatricial (scarring) alopecia: This type of hair loss occurs most often in women of African descent. It begins in the center of the scalp. As it progresses, the hair loss radiates out from the center of the scalp. The affected scalp becomes smooth and shiny. The hair loss can be very slow or rapid. When hair loss occurs quickly, the person may have tingling, burning, pain, or itching on the scalp. Treatment may help the hair re-grow if scarring has not occurred.
Hair loss shampoo probably won’t help you defeat hair loss on its own, but it certainly should be used as another weapon in your arsenal. Many of these products do contain ingredients that are beneficial for hair loss and scalp health—every little bit helps. Let’s face it, you have to wash your hair with something and that something might as well aid in hair loss prevention.

A separate study, published in Skin Therapy Letter — a professional reference site for dermatologists — found that women also benefit from using the more potent 5 percent minoxidil treatment. “Patient-reported improvement in hair volume and coverage appears to be greater with 5 percent minoxidil foam,” reads the report. Plus, because the 5 percent treatment is stronger, women only have to apply it once a day to get the same results as they would with the 2 percent treatment applied twice daily.
Finally, if these tests come back normal, your dermatologist may suggest a scalp biopsy of a couple of two-millimeter sections taken from your scalp under local anesthesia ($400 and up). It can determine whether genetic hair loss, telogen effluvium (a condition in which hair falls out from stress or rapid weight gain), or a disease (such as lupus) is the cause of your shedding, and your dermatologist can treat you accordingly.
From the top of my head, I don’t remember if the Lipogaine’s Big 3 Shampoo contains ketoconazole but if it does, then that’s a definite plus. Another thing you can do is buy Nizoral and use it in conjunction with The Big 5 Shampoo. So for example, use Nizoral on Mondays and Thursdays and The Big 5 in all the days in between. That way you’d get all the benefits.
Hair loss can be devastating to many men, but perhaps even more so for women, who have often suffered in silence. But, fact is, women make up nearly 40 percent of hair-loss sufferers in the United States. The psychological damage associated with hair loss is, for many women, extensive, especially in a society where hair-loss in men – though usually unwanted – is more or less an accepted fact of life.
Along with male pattern baldness, there is also a condition known as female pattern baldness, in which hair thins on the top of the head. Less is known about this type of hair loss, but it is more common in women who have been through the menopause. Female pattern baldness cannot be treated with finasteride (as with male pattern baldness), but it can be treated with minoxidil. Minoxidil is rubbed into the scalp once or twice a day and should start to show results after about four months. After ceasing treatment with minoxidil, hair loss should resume within a few months.
The best fix by far for replacing lost hair is a transplant. Back in the day, docs used plugs that resembled cornrows (definitely not natural looking). Today, guys have more options. You can go for “the strip method” where a doctor surgically removes a strip of hair from the back of your head, dissects every hair graft under a microscope, and then plants the individual grafts onto hair-thin areas of your scalp with tiny incisions.
Again, as we've mentioned at the start, these treatments and cures are dependent on the cause and type of hair loss. While massage oils and a hair spa treatment can work on hair loss in men caused by a skin or scalp infection, these may not work for cases of pattern baldness that are hereditary or caused by DHT associated with male hormones. Even medications like minodixil and finasteride cannot offer a permanent cure. In cases of permanent hair loss like pattern baldness, sometimes the best type of cure is simply management of your condition.
“We are extremely pleased with the continued development of the patent portfolio we exclusively licensed from Columbia.  This new issuance continues to expand the breadth and depth of our JAK inhibitor intellectual property portfolio covering methods of use for certain JAK inhibitors for the treatment of hair loss disorders. The issuance of this patent is another step in the development of a robust patent portfolio relating to JAK inhibition and hair loss,”

However, the high incidence of androgenic alopecia is caused by the male hormones. Testosterone in the scalp is converted into dihydrotestosterone (DHT) that causes the follicles to shrink in size, therefore inhibiting the growth of hair, which eventually leads to baldness. However, hair follicles on the sides and back of the head do not have as much DHT compared to the top, hence why hair loss is concentrated on the crown of the head. Interestingly, DHT is known to help in the growth of the beard and hair on the chest, a reason why most bald men have hairy chests and grow their beards much faster.
Of course, there are plenty of men who wish desperately to restore their youthful locks, and a few — we can think of one powerful one — who cling to elaborate comb-overs, but many balding men simply clip their hair short and go on with their lives. Dermatologists say hair loss is emotionally harder for women, who are often deeply embarrassed by thinning hair even though it's quite common. By the time they reach 50, about 40 percent of women are experiencing what's known as female-pattern hair loss, said Gopal Patel, a dermatologist with Aesthetic Dermatology Associates in Media. Women of African descent struggle with even more conditions that can damage hair follicles and cause bald spots.
Revivogen’s shampoo is formulated by dermatologists to do three different things: cleanse and revitalize the scalp while fighting dandruff with aloe vera and menthol, moisturize hair and make it look thicker and fuller with proteins and nutrients – and most importantly, prevent hair follicles and the scalp from being saturated with the DHT blamed for causing most cases of pattern baldness.
Literally jumping right out of the woodwork, the company “HCell” has announced they have been granted an orphan designation from the US FDA for their novel treatment of pediatric alopecia areata. The treatment itself it described as a “topical Injection by regenerating hair through a proprietary blend of commercially procured biologic and autologous tissue.” The company also mentions having a treatment for androgenic alopecia in the works as well. More info to come soon. News release here. 

Chemotherapy is also one of the primary causes of balding among cancer patients, men and women alike. While not all chemotherapy treatments result in hair loss, some that involves the use of drugs like Altretamine, Carboplatin, Docetaxel, and Idarubicin can cause hair thinning and hair fall. In such cases, the hair loss varies from person to person and the dosage of drugs administered. Hair fall doesn't occur at once, but rather after several weeks of treatment until hair fall rate increases after one or two months of exposure to chemotherapy. Radiation therapy as part of cancer treatment can also result into hair loss but typically only in areas where the radiation is targeted.

Unfortunately nutritional supplements are hit and miss. While the risks of side effects go down which is attractive, clinical data is sparse. In most cases the individual has to conduct their own experimentation. At 6 months a pop for a fair trial, this is a time consuming process. Time is a very limited commodity especially in the hair loss game. As we know, it is easier to do preventative maintenance than reverse hair loss. Nevertheless, natural DHT inhibitors like saw palmetto and nettle have worked to prevent hair loss in some users.
Natural hair that is subjected to constant physical trauma from excessive brushing or combing, tight braids or ponytails, or extreme scratching or massage can cause hair at the temples to become weak and to stop growing to its normal length. Clean shaving, especially for men, can cause white bumps to appear on the area where the hair was shaved short, and at times can become infected with pus and leave permanent scarring, affecting hair growth.
What’s equally frustrating for women is that their hair loss is not as clearly understood as hair loss in men and, according to an article in www.dermentz.org, “..presents itself quite differently from the more recognizable male pattern baldness which usually begins with a receding frontal hairline that progresses to a bald patch on top of the head.” The same article also says that it’s uncommon for women to follow a male pattern unless there is excessive production of androgens in her body.
Hair: It’s a natural part of being a human. But when the temperature climbs, and skin is exposed, it’s one of those things that a good many of us want to control. This week, we’re tackling hairlessness, not just the process of hair removal (electric shavers and ingrown-hair treatments and aesthetician-approved tweezers) but also what to buy when you’re losing your hair, and even how to take care of a Sphynx cat. Here, we’re talking to dermatologists and hair-loss doctors about hair-loss treatments that actually work.

Each hair develops from a follicle — a narrow pocket in the skin — and goes through three phases of growth. Anagen (A), the active growth phase, lasts two to seven years. Catagen (), the transition phase, lasts about two weeks. During this phase, the hair shaft moves upward toward the skin's surface, and the dermal papilla (the structure that nourishes cells that give rise to hair) begins to separate from the follicle. Telogen (C), the resting phase, lasts around three months and culminates in the shedding of the hair shaft.
"We developed a protocol to drive human pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into dermal papilla cells and confirmed their ability to induce hair growth when transplanted into mice," said Prof. Terskikh. The next step in their research is "to transplant human dermal papilla cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells back into human subjects."
You always hear these stories about people who take a homeopathic approach to fighting baldness. It’s always some off-the-wall remedy like smearing a paste of ginger and cayenne pepper on your scalp three times a day or eating a special type of ginseng farmed only in a rural village in Tibet. We'll go on the record to say that it's highly unlikely that these remedies work at any level.
After the robot was done, two nurses picked off the skin grafts and hairs and put them in petri dishes. While they prepared them for implantation, Bernstein explained the real future of the business: cloning. Bernstein has partnered with a Columbia University geneticist, Angela Christiano, who is working on duplicating hairs. The problem with hair transplantation is that you’re moving hairs around, not creating new ones. Women affected by female-pattern hair loss, in particular, are left out: they don’t have a thick back patch of “donor hair” to work with.

Patients with hair loss will often consult their family physician first. Hair loss is not life threatening, but it is distressing and significantly affects the patient's quality of life. The pattern of hair loss may be obvious, such as the bald patches that occur in alopecia areata, or more subtle, such as the diffuse hair loss that occurs in telogen effluvium. As with most conditions, the physician should begin the evaluation with a detailed history and physical examination. It is helpful to determine whether the hair loss is nonscarring (also called noncicatricial), which is reversible, or scarring (also called cicatricial), which is permanent. Scarring alopecia is rare and has various etiologies, including autoimmune diseases such as discoid lupus erythematosus. If the follicular orifices are absent, the alopecia is probably scarring; these patients should be referred to a dermatologist. This article will discuss approaches to nonscarring causes of alopecia.
Important clues to the etiology of different patterns and types of hair loss are listed in Table 1 and Table 2. Hair that comes out in clumps suggests telogen effluvium. Systemic symptoms such as fatigue and weight gain suggest hypothyroidism, whereas a febrile illness, stressful event, or recent pregnancy may account for the diffuse hair loss of telogen effluvium. The use of hair products such as straightening agents or certain shampoos suggests a diagnosis of trichorrhexis nodosa. A family history of hypothyroidism may warrant laboratory testing for this condition, whereas a family history of hair loss supports the diagnosis of androgenetic alopecia.
If you’re looking for an au naturel option, look no further. This shampoo has been an Amazon best seller since 2012. It smells great, lathers well, and has no harsh chemicals mixed in. Pura d’or has elimated all the bad stuff from this shampoo—no Parabens or SLS. It does have a ton of good stuff too! Practically every clinically proven natural ingredient that aids against hair loss is packed into this shampoo. Nettles extract, he shou wu (fo-ti), argan oil, B vitamins, biotin, and saw palmetto.
Thanks so much for the guidance! After further research I have to agree with you 100%. Lipogaine Big 3 does containe ketoconazole, which would eliminate the need for Nizoral, however the shampoo only contains a few hair loss/thinning related ingredients. The Big 5 contains 17 and just seems like a better overall product. That plus Nizoral twice weekly seems pretty solid to me.

We know our products deliver the intended results for the overwhelming majority of men and women who use them as directed. How do we know this? Because we have witnessed the results first-hand on customers of every age, race, and hair type. Because we've spent over 10 years developing, evolving and continually perfecting functional hair care products just like this. Because the Veta product line was tested, piloted and proven at select A-list salons prior to being launched to the public.

A diet that is poor or lacking in certain nutrients, particularly iron, protein, and vitamin B, which are essential in the production of keratin, can cause a long telogen phase and a very short anagen stage. On the other hand, excess supply of vitamin A in the body, especially those taken through supplements, can prove to be toxic and can cause a range of adverse body effects including loss of appetite, fatigue and consequently, hair loss.

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