You always hear these stories about people who take a homeopathic approach to fighting baldness. It’s always some off-the-wall remedy like smearing a paste of ginger and cayenne pepper on your scalp three times a day or eating a special type of ginseng farmed only in a rural village in Tibet. We'll go on the record to say that it's highly unlikely that these remedies work at any level.

Men’s Rogaine Extra Strength Solution is the liquid version of our top pick. It didn’t make our final cut because it includes propylene glycol, which causes irritation in roughly one-third of its users. With that said, Dr. Wolfeld finds that it can be even more effective in practical daily use. In his experience, “the solution can penetrate and get into your scalp a little bit better” than the foam — especially if you’re not taking the time and effort to apply the foam correctly. This seems crazy to us since the foam so quickly dissolved into a liquid in our tests, but if you’re worried, try a one-month supply of the liquid and make the switch to foam if you notice any irritation.
Now known as RCH-01, RepliCel’s procedure is a patented cellular replication and implantation technology designed to rejuvenate damaged and miniaturized hair follicles in a balding scalp. According to Buckler, the technology involves the extraction of as few as 20 hair follicles from the back of a patient’s scalp where healthy cycling hair follicles reside.  Specific cells are isolated from hair follicles and are cultured using the company’s proprietary cellular replication process.  The cultured cells are reintroduced or injected back into balding areas on a patient’s scalp and are expected to rejuvenate damaged hair follicles leading to the growth of new healthy hair fibers.
"We developed a protocol to drive human pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into dermal papilla cells and confirmed their ability to induce hair growth when transplanted into mice," said Prof. Terskikh. The next step in their research is "to transplant human dermal papilla cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells back into human subjects."
While there are much worse things that can happen to a person than losing their hair, there’s also no denying how incredibly frustrating it can be. There are many reasons for hair loss, including genetics, and even more products and solutions out there which claim to slow its progress while even growing new hair. Finding one that works for you, however, can be easier said than done. But we’re here to help.
Stay away from tightly bound styles, like braids, buns, or ponytails. Resist twisting or rubbing your hair. And gently wash or brush hair, switching to a wide-toothed comb if necessary to prevent too much pulling at the roots. Hot rollers, curling or straightening irons, hot oil treatments, bleaching, and other chemical processes are other things to avoid.
You’ll find ketoconazole in Nizoral anti-dandruff shampoo, and preliminary research indicates that it may be effective in treating hair loss. Researchers found that both 2% ketoconazole and minoxidil regimens improved hair density, size, and proportion of anagen follicles. Ketoconazole also is effective in treating a fungus called Pityriasis that often inhabits the scalp.
PolarityTE is a biotech company based in Salt Lake City, UT that kind of launched onto the scene late last year. Shortly after the company was formed it announced that its innovative lead product ‘SkinTE’ would be launching a limited release in several hospitals across the country. The launch of SkinTE came abruptly with no previous clinical trials for the product. This is due to the fact that SkinTE is based on autologous materials, which means they come from a patient and are applied back to the same patient. There is, of course, some manipulation done to the skin sample which is taken from a patient, but the FDA has deemed it to be minor enough not to need lengthy trials to reach the market.
There’s a lot of misinformation, half-truths, and pseudoscience regarding hair loss, and there are also treatment programs that have been well-researched and tested in clinical settings. So, how do you find the difference? For starters, talk to the experts in the industry like dermatologists and general physicians about treatment programs. Avoid people advertising secret cures, all-natural remedies, and permanent fixes. If there was a way to stop baldness from happening, we’d all know about it already.
Some immediately see a doctor for Rogaine or Propecia, seek out over-the-counter miracle baldness cures, or even look into hair transplants. Others, though, take a more measured approach and begin using shampoos which can help slow hair loss in a safe and natural way. Groom+Style has written about the reasons for hair loss in men previously.  The causes of hair loss in women and children are slightly different. You might also be interested in how to keep your hair healthy in other, natural ways. 

Rogaine’s foam squirts out just like hair mousse and is applied with “cool, dry hands.” Applying means working the foam down to the scalp where you want to see thicker growth — for it to work, “it has to get into your scalp,” Dr. Wolfeld explains. “If it sits on your hair, it’s not really as effective.” Once massaged, it dissolves into a watery liquid that leaves a tingly sensation, “but no burning!” one of our balding testers was happy to discover.
Central centrifugal cicatricial (scarring) alopecia: This type of hair loss occurs most often in women of African descent. It begins in the center of the scalp. As it progresses, the hair loss radiates out from the center of the scalp. The affected scalp becomes smooth and shiny. The hair loss can be very slow or rapid. When hair loss occurs quickly, the person may have tingling, burning, pain, or itching on the scalp. Treatment may help the hair re-grow if scarring has not occurred.
In fact, hair loss cures and treatments are a dime a dozen. There are cures that are designed for temporary hair loss conditions, and others more are available for permanent cases. It's also important to note that some of these cures are specific to the cause and the type of hair loss, and other treatments don't apply for other cases such as pattern balding. We've listed them all the same in order to give you a good idea of the breadth of choices available.
While there can be numerous reasons behind the thinning of your hair, including certain hairstyles, excessive chemical processes, hereditary factors, and nutritional deficiencies, the most common is aging. But why does hair become thin as we age? Well, as we get older so do our hair follicles. With age, the size of hair follicles begins to shrink, meaning the rate of hair growth begins to slow down and, in some cases, ceases completely. Another reason for thinning hair lies in the production (or lack thereof) of estrogen as we age. Aside from regulating the reproductive system, estrogen plays a big part in hair growth. So, when we begin to produce less estrogen, there's less available to stimulate new hair growth (especially after old hair has shed), ultimately resulting in thin hair.
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