Hair loss is often distressing and can have a significant effect on the patient's quality of life. Patients may present to their family physician first with diffuse or patchy hair loss. Scarring alopecia is best evaluated by a dermatologist. Nonscarring alopecias can be readily diagnosed and treated in the family physician's office. Androgenetic alopecia can be diagnosed clinically and treated with minoxidil. Alopecia areata is diagnosed by typical patches of hair loss and is self-limited. Tinea capitis causes patches of alopecia that may be erythematous and scaly and must be treated systemically. Telogen effluvium is a nonscarring, noninflammatory alopecia of relatively sudden onset caused by physiologic or emotional stress. Once the precipitating cause is removed, the hair typically will regrow. Trichotillomania is an impulse-control disorder; treatment is aimed at controlling the underlying psychiatric condition. Trichorrhexis nodosa occurs when hairs break secondary to trauma and is often a result of hair styling or overuse of hair products. Anagen effluvium is the abnormal diffuse loss of hair during the growth phase caused by an event that impairs the mitotic activity of the hair follicle, most commonly chemotherapy. Physician support is especially important for patients in this situation.
Keranique is another line of products targeted towards women. They offer a complete system consisting of shampoos, conditioners, and topicals. Our testers found that it was one of the harshest shampoos and was not always color safe. Their topical foam contains Minoxidil which can irritate some scalps. Keranique hair products are safe to use and highly effective.  They also have an anti-dandruff shampoo that has received amazing reviews.
7/26/18 Update: After positive early data, various trials of JAK inhibitors such as Ruxolitinib and Xeljanz are underway. Columbia researchers have had positive results with Xeljanz in 11 out of 12 subjects achieving some regrowth with no adverse side effects over 16 months of treatment. Investigators at Stanford and Yale are conducting three trials of oral and topical tofacitnib and Locks of Love Foundation is fuding another ruxolitinib study. At this time, there are about 15 publications looking at JAK inhibitors and their relationship to alopecia and its variants.
While you are waiting for the Big breakthrough, You may want to give Rosemary and Lavender essential oil a shot. I have found that my scalp feels much healthier after using this treatment once a week. I’m in hopes it is stimulating new hair growth as well. Check out some recipes online and reply with your thoughts or other techniques you find helpful. Let’s help each other fight the good fight against hair loss!
And, for all of these collective efforts, Christiano reminded me, the only things that have really worked were discovered accidentally. Soon to join minoxidil and finasteride will be Xeljanz, or tofacitinib: originally developed for rheumatoid arthritis, it has remarkable effects on hair growth for patients with alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder that causes patients to lose hair in big patches over their entire bodies.

Egg mask. Eggs are one of the riches sources of protein, which is the building block of keratin, as well as other minerals like zinc, iron, selenium, phosphorous and iodine. Mix an egg white with a tablespoon of olive oil and honey to make a paste. Apply it on your hair and leave on for 20 minutes. Rinse and shampoo using cold water. You can apply this egg mask on your hair once a week.
Managing hair loss is just as important as treating it. Now that we've talked about the different treatment options and cures available to reverse hair loss and promote increased growth, let's talk about how you can manage your condition and at the same time prevent further hair loss. The first is more psychological, while the second is more practical.

A clinician diagnoses female pattern hair loss by taking a medical history and examining the scalp. She or he will observe the pattern of hair loss, check for signs of inflammation or infection, and possibly order blood tests to investigate other possible causes of hair loss, including hyperthyroidism, hypothyroidism, and iron deficiency. Unless there are signs of excess androgen activity (such as menstrual irregularities, acne, and unwanted hair growth), a hormonal evaluation is usually unnecessary.
It is called the vampire treatment because blood is taken from the patient that removes the platelet rich plasma. Then, the PRP is injected back into the scalp. This energizes the scalp with new active blood flow. Treatment is available at select clinics but widespread adoption may become the norm. It is less invasive than hair transplants but costs more if you count the cost of doing many sessions.
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